Old Weather Forum

Shore Leave => Dockside Cafe => Topic started by: DJ_59 on October 20, 2010, 07:01:11 pm

Title: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: DJ_59 on October 20, 2010, 07:01:11 pm

Hi, everyone.

We're all seeing a lot of extremely interesting log entries.  We might have to wade through a pile of same ol' before we see one, but we get them.  Orrery66 told me about her ship chasing down an American ship, firing across the bow, boarding and leaving with two German prisoners.  Someone else posted about a ship that lost a man overboard, and it was logged with a touch of personalization and implied emotion.  Funerals have been mentioned, sailors playing like children on the deck, families seeing the ships off.  All kinds of things that stand out.  I saw one where a mechanical failure was described in slightly salty terms.  That was fun.  If you have any of those, please post them here for everyone to see.  Thanks.

Deej
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: DJ_59 on October 20, 2010, 07:09:24 pm

I'm copying this from a message in "The Human Aspect".  They're similar topics, but they both have their own place here.  That one is for the things specifically about people, while this one could include anything out of the ordinary that makes for exciting or, as the topic says, riveting reading and gets the imagination going.  Paints a picture, let's say.


:) Well I found a non-letter symbol. I have seen others but this one was very interesting(http://i249.photobucket.com/albums/gg230/elizabethsiegel/Capture.png)Now tell me if I am seeing this wrong but I see a  drawing of a balloon with the word God printed inside it and strings on the bottom to indicate upward flight  I have come to this conclusion after reading the script.
Aug 4, 1919
HMS Nairana

According to the log they have sent out a search party evreyday for the last five days,
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tredegar on October 21, 2010, 07:57:36 pm
Here's one from the Welland from 24 Feb 1918. This was stapled to the front of the page for that day. Apparently the ship ran into a gale and suffered a loss of some material.
(http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-68386/ADM%2053-68386-030_1.jpg)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Haywain on October 22, 2010, 06:31:21 am
Amazing what you can lose in a good gale  ;)  Excellent for balancing your accounts!

Regards

Haywain
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tsering on October 22, 2010, 08:15:38 pm
Earlier today I found this: a sighting of a comet, off the coast of Brasil:

(http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-33549/ADM53-33549-136_1.jpg)

I posted this in the forum of Galaxy Zoo, and soon Zookeeper Chris let us know this would have been Comet Mellish - thanks!
http://www.galaxyzooforum.org/index.php?topic=278414.0 (http://www.galaxyzooforum.org/index.php?topic=278414.0)


Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: elizabeth on October 22, 2010, 08:34:26 pm
 :D Awesome Tsering  well spotted!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: DJ_59 on October 23, 2010, 12:40:21 am

That's really something!  Not what you expect to read in these logs at all.  But then I'm starting to figure out that anything might show up.

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: ElisabethB on October 23, 2010, 09:34:51 pm
 :o
HMS Crocus, September 13th 1921
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1107/5108527638_cd9965b636_z.jpg)
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-74526/ADM%2053-74526-122_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: DJ_59 on October 24, 2010, 03:53:56 am

ALSO unexpected! 
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: ElisabethB on October 24, 2010, 02:26:11 pm
The evening activities on the HMS Crocus are very interesting !  :D
(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1079/5110004153_82a24778f6.jpg)
12th October 1921
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-74526/ADM%2053-74526-137_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tsering on October 25, 2010, 07:25:01 pm
That's wonderful  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: danach on October 27, 2010, 11:50:33 pm
Hi everyone,
I posted this over in a different thread, but it was suggested that this qualifies as a Riveting Entry.
The Ernest Shackleton came aboard my ship and I thought that was pretty neat!

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-34544/ADM%2053-34544-003_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on October 29, 2010, 10:50:49 am
Most interesting thing I've had happen so far is that one of my crew was reprimanded for falling asleep on watch. Thing is, both he and someone else (the captain possibly?) have signed the log entry, presumably to verify its accuracy.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-46282/ADM53-46282-067_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Veero on October 29, 2010, 06:27:17 pm
The Curlew has been spending several days in San Pedro (Los Angeles, California).  Every afternoon the ship is open to visitors.  On 22 June 1923 they dressed the ship in honour of  the Anniversary of the Coronation of His Majesty King George V.  They fired a 21 gun salute.

Not riveting, maybe, but certainly interesting.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Press-ganged by the Swiss Navy on October 29, 2010, 09:14:39 pm
who nicked my tatties! log entry from HMS Amethyst off the coast of Uruguay: "8.0 80lbs potatoes stolen during night"

That is serious midnight munchies  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: navalhistory on October 29, 2010, 09:35:10 pm
Veero,

You can find more about CURLEW at this time in http://www.naval-history.net/WW1z08America-Curlew.htm . The San Pedro visit is confirmed in the left hand column - taken from Times Archives.

Not too many weeks after the San Pedro visit, the US Navy suffered probably it's worst peacetime disaster not too far away at Point Honda, California - http://www.naval-history.net/WW1z07Americas.htm

Gordon
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on October 29, 2010, 10:04:59 pm
Another reprimand aboard the Laurentic, this time for speaking in an improper manner. I want to know what he said!  :o

(http://i1201.photobucket.com/albums/bb352/Fiona_Wynn/Reprimandspeakinginappropriately.jpg?t=1288386159)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: kennymac825 on October 29, 2010, 11:26:01 pm
The last of Barrett's privateers:

Reminds me of the Caine Mutiney and the Strawberrys ;D
I can see Humphrey Bogart rolling the steel balls in his hand as he is grilled by the defence attorney. (Jose Ferrer?)

Great movie
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: DJ_59 on October 30, 2010, 01:13:38 am

Kenny:

Oh yeah!  Near the top of the list of Bogie's best, and that's saying a whole lot.  Bogie's my favorite actor.  I could watch that movie a hundred times.  Oh wait... I think I have.

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on October 30, 2010, 11:46:29 am
Paint Overboard!  ;D

(http://i1201.photobucket.com/albums/bb352/Fiona_Wynn/PaintOverboard.jpg?t=1288435548)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: ElisabethB on October 31, 2010, 12:25:11 pm
HMS Crocus 28/07/1922
Need some cash ?  :D
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4086/5131053695_88ab18380b.jpg)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: TenDown on November 01, 2010, 12:12:06 am
As a former submariner I was delighted to spot a log entry from another age for HMS CHRISTOPHER in the South West Channel - a/c SW and increased speed. Airship C61 reported submarine.  Now that's not something you'll get to read that often.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: ElisabethB on November 01, 2010, 11:34:27 am
HMS Crocus 17th September 1922
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4018/5135092545_14b08f9e3e.jpg)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tsering on November 01, 2010, 02:07:12 pm
HMS Crocus 28/07/1922
Need some cash ?  :D
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4086/5131053695_88ab18380b.jpg)

I would love to know what all that was about!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Press-ganged by the Swiss Navy on November 03, 2010, 10:10:21 pm
Still following HMS Amethyst, which having patrolled the eastern seaboard of South America for quite a while has headed over to Sierra Leone where she met HMS Britannia and from her came a nice cargo of bullion (I presume gold, I don't think you get chocolate bullion) to the value of ?1,000,000  [little finger held to mouth a la Dr Evil)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on November 03, 2010, 11:00:54 pm
Chocolate bullion would be nice though!  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: toucans on November 04, 2010, 12:11:08 pm
HMS New Zealand on her post WW1 round-the-world tour with Admiral of the Fleet Viscount Jellicoe (and, apparently, his missus) in Melbourne in June 1919, while coaling ship -

Lost overboard by accident. Shovels 2 in no
56 bags coal 2 cwt

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-52665/ADM53-52665-069_0.jpg (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-52665/ADM53-52665-069_0.jpg)

Although it looks like the same handwriting it's written in with much blacker ink, as though later, or by someone else.  Was there a standard RN handwriting?

(So each bag of coal was a quarter of a ton?  56 bags all at once?  Did they have pallets?  Oh for a time machine...
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: navalhistory on November 04, 2010, 02:46:03 pm
Coaling ship:

google images for "coaling ship"
see how "simple" it is http://www.gwpda.org/naval/wff01.htm
trying to clean up ship afterwards in image alongside HMS Goliath in http://www.naval-history.net/Oxon01-ShipList.htm

Gordon
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: toucans on November 05, 2010, 09:27:43 am
Wow!  Thank you, that's wonderful.

My mother remembers her father talking about hating coaling ship, when everyone had to get stuck in and get covered head to foot in coal dust.  He was really grateful when he got promoted (to some kind of petty officer, which isn't quite whati it says on the link...) and didn't have to do it any more.

On the photograph, it's marvellous how white the jolly matelots' tunics are.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: kin47 on November 05, 2010, 01:13:15 pm
Hello

My ship had a Lieutenant Commander written up for exceeding the limit on his wine bill and drinking more glasses of spirits than allowed.

All best

don
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: jennfurr on November 06, 2010, 01:56:01 pm
On 3 Feb 1916 en route from Jamaica to Bermuda, the HMS Leviathan saw a solar eclipse!!

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-46568/ADM%2053-46568-004_1.jpg (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-46568/ADM%2053-46568-004_1.jpg)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: ElisabethB on November 06, 2010, 02:05:08 pm
Wow !
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on November 06, 2010, 02:24:50 pm
Hurricane!

(http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-46296/ADM%2053-46296-009_0.jpg)

All sorts of things blown away. Can't imagine being on a ship in force 12 winds! Can't imagine being anywhere in force 12 winds!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: navalhistory on November 06, 2010, 07:22:39 pm
Have a look at http://www.naval-history.net/IndexVideo-BoatrideStormatsea.wmv

Gordon
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on November 06, 2010, 07:27:38 pm
Amazing. No wonder there were bits falling off the poor old Laurentic left right and centre!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Press-ganged by the Swiss Navy on November 06, 2010, 09:24:32 pm
Wow, really nasty weather - blurgh   :P
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tsering on November 07, 2010, 11:33:03 pm
Have a look at http://www.naval-history.net/IndexVideo-BoatrideStormatsea.wmv

Gordon
I had to go and take a Buccastem after watching that!  :(
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: elizabeth on November 08, 2010, 08:42:53 am
On 3 Feb 1916 en route from Jamaica to Bermuda, the HMS Leviathan saw a solar eclipse!!

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-46568/ADM%2053-46568-004_1.jpg (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-46568/ADM%2053-46568-004_1.jpg)
8) 8)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Caro on November 10, 2010, 02:01:57 pm
It was just one of those days on the Argonaut, October 1914 .....

(http://img209.imageshack.us/img209/674/targetm.jpg)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: djj on November 11, 2010, 11:29:02 pm
Earlier today I found this: a sighting of a comet, off the coast of Brasil:

(http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-33549/ADM53-33549-136_1.jpg)

I posted this in the forum of Galaxy Zoo, and soon Zookeeper Chris let us know this would have been Comet Mellish - thanks!
http://www.galaxyzooforum.org/index.php?topic=278414.0 (http://www.galaxyzooforum.org/index.php?topic=278414.0)

If the middy keeping the log on HMS Amethyst had an eye for astronomy, his counterpart on HMS Phaeton seems to be more concerned with greengrocery: "1 bag of potatoes 112 lbs lost overboard by accdent" ::) Although I suppose, to be fair, he was probably told this dreadful accident needed to be recorded :D.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: djj on November 12, 2010, 09:43:33 pm
HMS Phaeton docked at Birkenhead, 1 June 1915: "Leave to boys until 9.45 pm to attend picture palace" :).
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: ElisabethB on November 12, 2010, 09:44:58 pm
Aww ! I just wonder which 'movie' they were going to see !  :D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: toucans on November 13, 2010, 12:05:01 pm
Nice to know they thought about some light relief for the boys, even during the war!

From HMS New Zealand's log, 26 August 1919, while in port at Wellington (ahem, New Zealand) -

am and early pm:  "Hands employed as requisite..." (so far, so standard) "... and decorating ship"  (Oh, that's different)

early evening:     "Ship's Company held Ball"
                                   "1200 visitors"

Not sure if the 1200 visitors were all at the ball - they'be been recording lots of visitors (16,000+ on the first Saturday after they arrived, and 21,000+ on the Sunday), but they're shown as xxx Ship Visitors.

Anyway, did a WW1 battle cruiser have acres of open deck available for the holding of balls (I can remember at least two before this), like the sailing ships had?

And I wonder what the Ship's Company did for partners?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on November 13, 2010, 12:09:35 pm
I'm sure there would have been plenty of local girls who would have been more than willing to dance with a dashing sailor at a ball!  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: gjelbri on November 13, 2010, 05:32:55 pm
Well, I don't think I'd call this actually "riveting", but it was something that I hadn't considered. On Feb 25th, 1921 (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-76850/ADM%2053-76850-0034_1.jpg), after removing all their bags and hammocks, the entire of the crew of the Endeavour left the ship for the HMS Egmont except for 5 ratings so the ship could be fumigated.  Feel kind of sorry for the 5 who had to stay behind!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Veero on November 13, 2010, 10:48:30 pm
Unbelievably riveting.  I jumped ship and joined the battlecruiser HMS Invincible.  In November 1914 they had fun "crossing the line" when "H.M. King Neptune held his court and carried out the customary rites".  (My mother had told me about that when she was travelling to North Africa in WW2).  I thought that was interesting.

However, on 8th December 1914 they were involved in quite a scrap in the Falklands involving a number of British and German vessels.  2 German ships were sunk including the flagship of German Admiral von Spee. I was pleased and moved to note that they went full speed ahead to pick up survivors.  The following day they held a short funeral service for dead German sailors. 

At the end of the same day they altered course several times "for investigating whales".   I expect they needed nature to help them recover from the terrors of their experience.

Fancy transcribing all that on the eve of Remembrance Sunday.  Thank you Old Weatherfolk, I'm very touched.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CharlesNorrieTemp on November 14, 2010, 09:37:28 am
If Veero's mother encountered King Neptune on a trip to North Africa, if she started from the northern hemisphere, the equator's moved a bit, or Africa had sudden continental drfit.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Veero on November 14, 2010, 08:21:43 pm
I agree, that sounded odd.  I was thinking of that after I posted my message.  My mother, who was a military  nurse,  sailed on a troop ship that went via South Africa.  I expect they had to avoid the Med because of enemy occupation and manoeuvres in North Africa.  I wonder how they reached the Libyan desert   - I imagine they went to Cairo via the Suez Canal.   
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CharlesNorrieTemp on November 14, 2010, 09:08:51 pm
Our forbears' lives were much more complicated than we think them to be!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: pliget on November 15, 2010, 02:11:33 pm
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-46283/ADM%2053-46283-010_1.jpg

What was it do you think Mr G Tracey said to be issued with a 1919 ASBO :)?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on November 15, 2010, 07:00:56 pm
Ooh! You're on the Laurentic?! That was my first ship  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on November 15, 2010, 11:45:02 pm
We had an interesting day today on the Caronia outside New York in April - the side of Caronia was rammed by a 6 masted schooner!  Around 8PM so dark, but still a clear good-weather day.  Who can be blamed for this fender bender?!  I'd think that ships that large on an open sea would be easy to spot and avoid!!  ???
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CharlesNorrieTemp on November 16, 2010, 07:36:56 am
The six master was quite within his rights.  At the beginning of the steam era, Richard Henry Dana (he of Two Years Before the Mast) promulgated the doctrine of "steam gives way to sail".  It is observed in the breach when a hulking great 250,000 ton oil tanker encounters a Cornish Crabber, but might doesn't make right, you know!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on November 16, 2010, 08:23:43 pm
The six master was quite within his rights.  At the beginning of the steam era, Richard Henry Dana (he of Two Years Before the Mast) promulgated the doctrine of "steam gives way to sail".  It is observed in the breach when a hulking great 250,000 ton oil tanker encounters a Cornish Crabber, but might doesn't make right, you know!

Thanks for the lesson on sea-courtesy.  Land lubbers like me need a teacher here.  Since the wind is not controlable in an engine room, it makes sense - provided no one works out Newton's Laws for various sizes!

I have to wonder about someone's intelligent reasoning: if  a tall ship comes up against a large Cunard liner like our Caronia that has great mass and therefore little agility, should they be stubborn about demanding passage through the liner?  I'd think the greater fragility of the wood would be more important than hubris!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Caro on November 16, 2010, 09:25:15 pm
An interesting letter from HMS Argonaut:

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-34038/ADM53-34038-007_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on November 16, 2010, 09:32:59 pm
...yeah, and the crew all looked a bit Dutch  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: ElisabethB on November 16, 2010, 10:44:37 pm
But what a beautiful handwriting !  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: jennfurr on November 17, 2010, 05:46:48 am
Now why can't our logs be written that clearly?  Wow!

...how does one "look Dutch"?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Caro on November 17, 2010, 07:54:57 am
Generally by being tall and fair-haired.
I am unlikely to be mistaken for a Dutch person.  ;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: jennfurr on November 17, 2010, 03:01:17 pm
Caro - by looking at your avatar, i'd say you're short, and a bit furry  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Caro on November 17, 2010, 04:57:06 pm
Well I am short ....  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: toucans on November 18, 2010, 11:00:25 am
I got the New Zealand dateline experience too - on the first 12 Oct the logkeeper wrote 'Australian date' above the date, and on the second one he wrote 'American date'.

On the clock changing thing, when they were heading across the Indian Ocean there were a lot of days with the entry 'Set clocks forward [or was it back?] 20 mins' at 2.00 am.  On this leg there was a clock change of, I think, 35 mins, and one of 15 mins.  So, yes, they are evidently adjusting to solar time.  I didn't think it was interesting enough to record it though..... :-[

When they arrive in a port, they're only going to be synchronised with the local time if that's the true solar time.  It would be amazing if that were so everywhere, but I haven't seen any entries suggesting a synchronisation to local time.  Unless that's what accounts for the odd changes in the Pacific.  Or would there have been tables of how everywhere's local time was + or - solar time?

I wonder how many clocks there were.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on November 20, 2010, 04:22:18 pm
(http://i1201.photobucket.com/albums/bb352/Fiona_Wynn/UnknownMan.jpg?t=1290270096)

Am I right in thinking that's 'No results' at the end? Does that mean the sentry missed and the unknown man legged it?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on November 20, 2010, 09:20:03 pm
looks like "no results" to me - I wonder if it was just some kid who liked ships - that would be a shock to one's system! ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on November 20, 2010, 09:21:51 pm
Well, earlier a boy was injured on the dock and treated onboard - maybe it was the same boy come back to say thanks?  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: studentforever on November 20, 2010, 10:38:04 pm
I think it reads - no results which I would translate as 'he missed'.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: ElisabethB on November 23, 2010, 04:23:53 pm
HMS Crocus, 24th October 1923 : ship placed in quarantaine, because of cholera !
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-74528/ADM%2053-74528-151_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on November 23, 2010, 11:37:06 pm
Because cholera is carried in water, and never communicated between people, isn't that confining everyone on board with the contaminated water?  Did that tragedy happen regularly?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on November 24, 2010, 07:14:36 am
(http://i1201.photobucket.com/albums/bb352/Fiona_Wynn/LeaveBoysMrSmith.jpg)

Who is Mr Smith and what is he doing with my boys?!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: navalhistory on November 24, 2010, 04:27:13 pm
Probably commissioned schoolmaster.

Gordon
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: kin47 on November 24, 2010, 04:52:38 pm
Hello Cyzaki

Having trouble identifying Mr. Smith.  What is the date range and ship this entry came?

All best

don
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on November 24, 2010, 06:16:38 pm
HMS Almanzora, November 1916.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on November 24, 2010, 06:52:05 pm
I seem to be in Brocklebank Dock, Liverpool. So the mystery of the Southern Base is solved!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: ElisabethB on November 24, 2010, 07:11:28 pm
Because cholera is carried in water, and never communicated between people, isn't that confining everyone on board with the contaminated water?  Did that tragedy happen regularly?

The quarantaine was lifted the next day or so. They had a couple of medical inspections and they disinfected the ship. The numbers in the sick bay stayed normal, so I guess it was just this one casualty.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on November 25, 2010, 01:24:17 am
Because cholera is carried in water, and never communicated between people, isn't that confining everyone on board with the contaminated water?  Did that tragedy happen regularly?

The quarantaine was lifted the next day or so. They had a couple of medical inspections and they disinfected the ship. The numbers in the sick bay stayed normal, so I guess it was just this one casualty.

I'm Im glad it was handled so quickly, and that there was no epidemic. 
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CharlesNorrieTemp on November 25, 2010, 12:38:01 pm
It was ports' medical authorities who quarantined ships.  They had no duty of care towards ships' crews and were concerned only that infection should not be transferred from ship to shore.

o ships were often sent to a remote part of an anchorage to sit it out until an epidemic has passed (usually by virtue of a number of days quarantine). 

By our period the miasma theory of disease transmission was long gone, and it was recognised cholera was water -borne. (The John Snow and Braod Street pump affair.)

Whether precautions were taken to clean out ships' water tanks, I don't know.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: ElisabethB on November 27, 2010, 01:39:41 pm
A bit of light relief on the HMS Crocus, 15th May 1921  :D
(http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4084/5211641202_a5e0f693d3_z.jpg)

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-74526/ADM%2053-74526-061_0.jpg

ps : the second whaler didn't return until 6 am the next day.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on November 27, 2010, 11:00:26 pm
This was the day they sold the ship I'd been Captain of out from under everyone.  I found it symbolic that the last notation before the ship was sold was of the hands scrubbing all the decks.  It's been a strangely sad experience for me.

http://www.oldweather.org/classify/edit/4cf18a7934617d033500001f

My voyage is finished, but the ship is only 94% complete.  Some one else will have to finish it.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: DJ_59 on November 28, 2010, 04:33:06 am

That's so sad.  :(  You can just imagine how the crew felt. 
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on November 28, 2010, 09:10:57 am
I was feeling down, so started working on survey ships for a total change of pace.  And discovered I really enjoy them, and the quiet detailed study they do.  I brought Sealark to 100% in the Solomon Islands, and am now working on Endeavor outside Alexandria, Egypt.

Also, they tend to be very careful of the weather data and precise and terse about their notes.  Probably from the scientific mindset.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on November 28, 2010, 10:07:25 pm
Taken prisoner by Moors!  :o

(http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-36573/ADM%2053-36573-076_0.jpg)

But it all ends well  ;D

(http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-36573/ADM%2053-36573-076_1.jpg)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries - distressed SS Veronica
Post by: farrelly on November 29, 2010, 06:04:33 am
On the Leviathan, April 5, 1918.  Note the "to & from" near the top of the log - searching for the distressed SS Veronica.  Then crews ready for towing, a derelict is spotted, and the towing gear is put away.  I couldn't find anything about an SS veronica for this time period.

http://www.oldweather.org/classify/edit/4cf3291c34617d5e42000043
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: notelrac on December 01, 2010, 02:40:22 am
I can't compete with being attacked by the moors, but I still think it's cool that the log for HMS Lunka notes a lunar eclipse occuring at 12:15 AM on July 5, 1917.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Veero on December 01, 2010, 10:07:15 pm
Just felt that I had to report that I have just completed HMS Hood.  I feel quite proud to have done that.   Tomorrow I shall have the pleasure of selecting another ship to work on.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on December 01, 2010, 10:31:50 pm
It's so exciting when you choose a new ship! Do you go for one you think might be exciting, or one with beautiful handwriting, or one that seems sad and lonely with nobody caring for it? Or do you try for the jackpot of all three at once?!  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: jennfurr on December 02, 2010, 04:44:02 am
It's so exciting when you choose a new ship! Do you go for one you think might be exciting, or one with beautiful handwriting, or one that seems sad and lonely with nobody caring for it? Or do you try for the jackpot of all three at once?!  ;D

If I ever finish Leviathan, I'm going for the sad and lonely one.  I know it ends - there should be about two more years' worth of logs to deal with before it's paid off.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: ElisabethB on December 02, 2010, 10:45:37 pm
Somehow I  think I'll go for a sad and lonely one too !  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: jennfurr on December 03, 2010, 05:00:02 am
So... anyone interested in how a mutiny looks?

Here's a summary of what I transcribed last night before my internet went down.  Unfortunately, it didn't come back up until just now, and the rest of the logs for a month after the fact are already done so I don't have access  :(

HEY!  I think anyone who is Captain should be able to have access to all their ship's logs.  Whaddaya think?  Anyway, on to the mutiny.  There's no mention, however, of the piano that ended up on the dock.

HMS Leviathan, in port at Birkenhead

Prior to October 6th - nothing unusual logged.  No mention of unrest with the Stokers, no unusual amount of warrants read, and no mention of a cancelled leave.

October 6, 1918
Noon: Ship's Police, NCOs, P/Os posted on dockyard gates.
1:15p - Large numbers of ships company assembled on jetty.
1:35 - Large numbers of ships company, accompanied by civilians, marched out through Green Lane dockyard gate, against orders.
3:30 - About 70 men (absentees) broke into ship.
5:00 - Posted armed Marine guard (6 men & NCO) at each (4) dockyard gate.
5:10 - Large numbers of Ships Company (estimated at 150) broke through marine guard and out of Green Lane dockyard gate.

October 7
12:45a - Number of absentees returned aboard (est 60)
6:60 - Number of absentees returned aboard (estimated 100)
8:00 - Leading hands of Stoker's messes interviewed by Captain on Quarterdeck
9:30 - 2 or 3 parties of men broke out of ship at intervals.
10:15am - Men wishing to see Captain interviewed by Captain.
10:30pm - Stoker Percy sent under escort to Bridewell.

October 8
7:30a - Men who broke out returned aboard.
9:15 - Admiral Stileman (SNO Liverpool) came aboard, hands mustered by the ledger.
11:50 - Hauled off dock wall and proceeded under Pilot, out of dock, 4 tugs in attendance.
12:30p - Made fast to Cunard Buoy
7:00p - SNO left.

October 9
10:30a - Court of Enquiry held aboard.  President: Commodore Luce R.N.

A couple days later, the Court of Enquiry continued.



...And that's when I was so tired, I had to go to bed, and then the internet went down.



Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: farrelly on December 03, 2010, 05:31:54 am
re Leviathan -- wow!  so VERy sorry I missed all that - i did logs before & after. the only mention was a (then) mysterious "continued court of inquiry" on October 10.  Nothing that informs the events you describe.

On another note, the Leviathan collided with a partially submerged hull on oOct 12, leaving Birkenhead, severing her cable.  didn't seem to slow her down, though.

I'll never make captain, but it would be great if all crew could look at previously entered logs for the ship they're working on.
Nice work, Capt. Jenfurr!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: jennfurr on December 03, 2010, 06:15:54 am
farrelly - you could potentially catch up - we should have two years' worth of logs still to do, and I can't always do logs every night; I've got three kids to deal with!  But if you keep doing all the hourly barometer readings, those add up fast!  24 a day instead of the standard 6!

(oh - and today 9 November, two pistols turned up missing from the aft locker - keep an eye out for them, would ya?)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on December 03, 2010, 07:03:41 am
Once a ship is finished, anyone can see all the logs.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: farrelly on December 03, 2010, 07:33:10 pm
Jenfurr,
I doubt I'll have the stamina to catch up -- you're amazing!  I did get carried away for a while with the sinking of the Orissa while in convoy, then recommissioned for a secret mission (turns out they were carrying bullion to another ship anchored of Halifax.) After I finished Nov. 8 - barely able to to focus after all those itsy-bitsy barometer readings, and were they running low on ink?--I did take a peek at Nov. 9 and saw the pistol thing.  I'll let you know if I find anything else about it.

I was also thinking more about your riot entry - I can't help wondering if it wasn't related to the death of Stoker Miller in NY around September 5. (Dangerous conditions for stokers?)

One more thing -- the war ended (armistice at least) with the Leviathan on convoy duty approaching Britain.  Not a peep about it in the log.

Kathy
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on December 03, 2010, 09:22:38 pm
oh dear - the rest of you had better hang on to your hats - there are two of us now!

Kathy
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: DJ_59 on December 04, 2010, 04:44:42 am

This is incredible stuff.  You know what's strange, though, is that I can't find mention of it through a basic Google search.  You'd think it'd be easy.  I wonder if they swept it under the carpet.  Or if nothing came of it. 

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: jennfurr on December 04, 2010, 05:46:18 am
OW Team Member "Navalhistory" found this account of the mutiny, which is how I knew what/when to look...

http://books.google.com/books?id=fsFhYp6HQIUC&pg=PA71&dq=isbn:9004171398&source=gbs_toc_r&cad=3#v=onepage&q=leviathan&f=false

I've tried to look for the history of the Leviathan, and there's just not much out there for WWI.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on December 04, 2010, 09:55:36 am
Grog is very important  :o

(http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-36573/ADM%2053-36573-144_1.jpg)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on December 06, 2010, 07:09:32 am
In fact, alcohol seems to be a bit too important to some aboard Caesar:

(http://i1201.photobucket.com/albums/bb352/Fiona_Wynn/Alcohol.jpg)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: elizabeth on December 06, 2010, 09:14:30 am
In fact, alcohol seems to be a bit too important to some aboard Caesar:

(http://i1201.photobucket.com/albums/bb352/Fiona_Wynn/Alcohol.jpg)
:D LOL
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: ElisabethB on December 06, 2010, 09:32:16 pm
LOL indeed  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Veero on December 07, 2010, 03:30:27 pm
Talking of wine, the other day the Captain of the Curlew had to reprimand one of the Lieutenants for ordering wine under the pretext that it was for guests.  Mind you, I'm not surprised some of them took to alcohol as life on this ship is not exciting - they spend a lot of time in port.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: strangford on December 07, 2010, 10:12:07 pm
HMS Virginian - 5 October 1915 @ 15:05
Captain's dog overboard.  Swung ship to starboard.  Engines as required.  Boarding ship away.
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-67708/ADM%2053-67708-005_1.jpg

"You fools, you brought back the wrong dog!  This is a German Shepherd!  Wait a minute... hmm."
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on December 08, 2010, 03:01:23 am
HMS Virginian - 5 October 1915 @ 15:05
Captain's dog overboard.  Swung ship to starboard.  Engines as required.  Boarding ship away.
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-67708/ADM%2053-67708-005_1.jpg

"You fools, you brought back the wrong dog!  This is a German Shepherd!  Wait a minute... hmm."
Especially since they didn't even log if the dog was recovered! Talk about lack of caring for the well-being of a crew dog member!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Haywain on December 08, 2010, 03:11:24 pm
Talking of wine, the other day the Captain of the Curlew had to reprimand one of the Lieutenants for ordering wine under the pretext that it was for guests.  Mind you, I'm not surprised some of them took to alcohol as life on this ship is not exciting - they spend a lot of time in port.

This is more serious than it initially appears.  If they work the same system in a Navy wardroom that they commonly do in Army Officers Messes, drinks for official guests are shared among all members regardless of whether they are present or not,  so this Lieutenant may have been getting wine largely at the expense of his fellow Officers!  :o  He wouldn't have been very popular!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on December 08, 2010, 07:41:58 pm
On  Aug. 13, 1922, on the Foxglove, war medals were presented  http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-77627/ADM%2053-77627-0024_0.jpg (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-77627/ADM%2053-77627-0024_0.jpg)

Kathy W.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on December 09, 2010, 08:54:08 pm
I reckon that the log keeper on board the M 31 had a thing about laundry. On one occasion they received a shell through the deck and into the ward room and officers cabins. Damage was reported to some furniture and two sheets and a pillow. On another occasion they lost some towels overboard.

K
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: ElisabethB on December 09, 2010, 09:04:59 pm
Oh dear !  Imagine that  ;D
I, for one, vote that these moments definitely have earned their place in the 'Riveting Entries' thread.
I'd never have thought that such trivial things would be worth mentioning ! Fascinating (as Mr Spock would say)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on December 09, 2010, 09:23:40 pm
I reckon that the log keeper on board the M 31 had a thing about laundry. On one occasion they received a shell through the deck and into the ward room and officers cabins. Damage was reported to some furniture and two sheets and a pillow. On another occasion they lost some towels overboard.
K
Definitely riveting, in that it gives us a view on the personalities on these ships.  This was definitively obsessive.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: dorbel on December 10, 2010, 09:26:20 pm
I liked, "Stopped and dropped target, which sank immediately". I can hear the lower deck mirth from here.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on December 10, 2010, 09:52:59 pm
My lot landed a hockey team.
No indication of who they played or what the score was.
I can imagine the armory with rifles, pistols and hockey sticks.
K
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on December 11, 2010, 09:10:07 pm
This one may be more curious:  HMS Danae is starting to the Azores with Flag "Delhi", "Dunedin" and "Dragon," which is why they had to pull out of line.

Whatever could be "confidential stores" - or maybe "stones" - and why jettison they?

Also, was it common to have a squadron of 4 ships, all of whom have the same initial?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: kin47 on December 11, 2010, 09:26:03 pm
Hello Janet

You don't have a date, but I presume post war.  The RN did have cruisers which showed off their new ships, hence the four D class cruisers.

Confidential stores would be any confidential that they needed to destroy as opposed to store.  Could have been anything from cypher codes to poison gas shells.

Keep up the good work!!

All best

don
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on December 11, 2010, 10:25:47 pm
Thanks, Don.  And yes, post war - February 1921.

It's nice to think of Danae showing herself off with shiny new classmates. :)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: DJ_59 on December 12, 2010, 05:29:04 am

I love the wording "hauled out of line".  For me that paints a funny image of an entire ship in biiiig trouble, like they're gonna make it drop and give them twenty.

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on December 12, 2010, 02:35:38 pm
That one makes me smile.  :)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: jdulak on December 12, 2010, 07:10:59 pm
Look at the "Remarks" entry for 8PM on March 13 1913.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-45611/ADM%2053-45611-206_1.jpg

John Dulak
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: jennfurr on December 12, 2010, 09:27:59 pm
Look at the "Remarks" entry for 8PM on March 13 1913.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-45611/ADM%2053-45611-206_1.jpg

John Dulak

Guess he didn't really want that transfer?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Haywain on December 12, 2010, 11:50:12 pm
A new one for HMS Christopher:

9 May 18 at 1.30pm in Devonport - "Investiture Party landed to attend investiture in HMS Apollo"

I wonder what that was all about? Nothing else given.

Must have been exciting because at 4pm we got "Hands to baths"!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: pliget on December 13, 2010, 07:41:27 pm
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-87625/ADM%2053-87625-136_0.jpg

On 11th May 1917 HMS Titania "Dressed ship in honour of Joan of Arc's Commemoration Day"

I see she lifted the siege at new Orleans on 8th May 1429 and was executed on 20th May 1431. She was also canonized 3 years after this, on 16th May 1920, but I see no particular Commemoration Day for her otherwise. And odd that the British would be celebrating her.

As an aside when I was looking for this I found on 6th May I had missed an entry where they dressed the ship on the anniversary of the coronation of King George V. I put in an entry therefore but it did not seem to accept my new entry. I thought it was possible to edit log pages after initial entry.


Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on December 13, 2010, 11:18:30 pm
I have put new notes into old pages on my ships, but there are a variety of problems different people experience - they are still searching for the bugs - and and variety of ways around them.

What exactly went wrong for you?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on December 13, 2010, 11:26:08 pm
Hi Pliget

I think that might have been the original Orleans, not new Orleans!!!

K
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on December 18, 2010, 09:57:08 am
On october 5th and 6th 1917 all boat crews from H.M.S. Challenger went for sailing races at Kilwa Kisiwani.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-37521/ADM53-37521-0078_1.jpg

I thought that there was a war to be fought or is it in preparation for some action?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Haywain on December 18, 2010, 11:16:45 am
Train hard, Fight easy ;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: pliget on December 18, 2010, 07:09:26 pm
Tegwen - you are so right - just a bit of word association football getting to me there I think.

No ideas on the event though.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on December 18, 2010, 11:12:58 pm
In the interests of historical accuracy, and because I know a song about this subject and because the it occurred on my birth date (contrary to what my children might think, I'm not that old!)  the battle of New Orleans occurred Jan 8, 1915.

yours -

Kathy W.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on December 18, 2010, 11:31:35 pm
In the interests of accuracy, it was 1815  :D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on December 18, 2010, 11:59:50 pm
cyzaki and wendolk, I'm quite sure the US was battling anyone at New Orleans in the 1900s.  [Well maybe sometimes mother nature and her hurricanes. :)]
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on December 19, 2010, 12:06:48 am
This a remarkable note on HMS Danae, 22nd May 1915.
"Manned ship.  H.M. King of Denmark arrived and secured to no.0 buoy."

First, I've looked in several sources and can't find any reference to a ship HMS King of Denmark - neither just "King" belonging to Denmark nor "King of Denmark".  Which to my mind eliminates the error of the log-keeper forgetting to write the 'S'.

Second, whatever would cause a King of Denmark to ever be secured to a buoy?  Or even helping secure a ship to a buoy?
 ???

ADDED: This is definitely a state visit.  On the 26th I found this note: "Dressed ship overall in honor of birthday of H.M. Queen Alexandra."

MORE ADDED: On the 30th: "Manned Ship. H.M. King of Denmark arrived."  At least he involved in the ship!

AND YET MORE:  On June 3rd "Dressed Ship overall in honour of HM.King's birthday."
They also rehearsed an honour guard on the king's birthday, which must have looked nice, and then on the 4th provided a guard of honour for the opening of the Belgium Memorial.  A VERY BUSY state visit!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: kin47 on December 19, 2010, 01:00:50 am
Joustly some old brain cells,

"In 1814, we took a little trip, along with Colonel Jackson, down the mighty Missipp'"

In 1815, the war was over.

All best

don
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on December 19, 2010, 09:11:15 am
Poor old HMS Caesar. For the last few days divers have been going out to locate the moorings of the Flagship (whatever that may mean) and they succeeded in marking them with buoys. Then the Dredger Queen Mary came along, went right over the top of the buoys, and carried one of them off.

I can just imagine the Crew of the Caesar standing on deck shouting "Noooooooooo!" as it happened! And, sure enough, the next day the divers are out again re-doing what the Queen Mary undid.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: kin47 on December 19, 2010, 09:28:51 am
Hello

Of course, not a ship.  His Majesty the King of Denmark arrived in his boat (whether a pinnace, ship's whaler, etc, etc) at the Buoy.

All best

don
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on December 19, 2010, 09:42:31 am
Thanks, Don, that actually makes sense.  Somehow, I didn't think of that, just thought the ship was tied to a pier for his visit.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: pliget on December 19, 2010, 03:11:52 pm
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-33655/ADM53-33655-026_1.jpg

2300 - Must have had a present day teenage time-traveller making that entry :)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on December 19, 2010, 03:24:57 pm
I'm not that sure - checking the Water Tight doors is part of his standard rounds.  And anyone can be awed and distracted by the beauties of nature!  Making sure his bosses know he was still working while being wowed by the display above is probably a good 'CYA' thing. :)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on December 19, 2010, 08:33:50 pm
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-33655/ADM53-33655-026_1.jpg

2300 - Must have had a present day teenage time-traveller making that entry :)

I think that this log entry says:

"11.0 Brilliant northern lights
all W.T. Doors closed except no 3."
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on December 20, 2010, 02:27:00 pm
Talk about a Freudian slip!  - every thing for me now has occurred in the early 1910s - 1920s -  ;D

As far as the date of the battle is concerned - yes, per the song, engagements began in December, 1814 (i.e., the Battle of Lake Borgne) , however, that which we call the Battle of New Orleans occurred on January 8, 1915.

As far as the rest of lyrics go for the song, The Battle of New Orleans, well, lets just say since this project is British, the less said the better!   :P

yours -

Kathy W.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on December 20, 2010, 03:00:33 pm
Talk about a Freudian slip!  - every thing for me now has occurred in the early 1910s - 1920s -  ;D

As far as the date of the battle is concerned - yes, per the song, engagements began in December, 1814 (i.e., the Battle of Lake Borgne) , however, that which we call the Battle of New Orleans occurred on January 8, 1915.
There's that 20th century battle again!!  Our countries were not stupid enough to repeat the War of 1812.  And no, as a guest here, I will not talk about the the results of 1815.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on December 20, 2010, 04:30:02 pm
Honestly - this project is effecting even my fingers and subconscious - I think 1815 and type 1915!!! I even check it for errors and SEE 1815 - I give up - I just have to accept that Old Weather has completely taken over my mind (ohhh - maybe that was what was intended all along  ;D)

yours -

Kathy W.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: DJ_59 on December 21, 2010, 01:20:16 am

DJ to Dr. X, DJ to Dr. X.  The plan is working.  Our zombie army is nearly complete.  Over.

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on December 21, 2010, 01:21:36 pm
 ;D ;D ;D

zombily yours -

Kathy W.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on December 21, 2010, 04:28:14 pm
My lot just gave a lift to HM Commissioner for Somalia, his wife and seven Sheikhs, from Berbera to Djibouti, and to 25 native soldiers with scurvy from Laskhorai to Berbera. We are little more than a taxi, but still fascinating.
K
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: pliget on December 21, 2010, 06:23:01 pm
1100 Half masted colours. Observed 2 minutes silence - in commemoration of 2nd anniversary of the Armistice.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-87622/ADM%2053-87622-031_1.jpg

Rather made me think.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Press-ganged by the Swiss Navy on December 21, 2010, 09:39:16 pm
HMS Canopus - 27 November 1914, Port Stanley

"Penguins Day Crew left ship" ???

the day before, the "Torpedo Lieut's party left ship, with mining gear"

That sounds quite a party...  any ideas what that's all about?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on December 21, 2010, 09:58:42 pm
I don't know about the Torpedo Lieut., but the other is probably a nature walk - and motivation for exercise.  I plugged "falkland islands penquins" into Yahoo, and this is one of several results: http://www.seabirds.org/penguins.htm

They really are there!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Haywain on December 21, 2010, 11:07:36 pm
Falklands Islands wildlife is truly amazing, spent 7 months there back in 1986.

Doubt they were digging for coal, so think we are talking sea mines here.  Torpedo Lt would have been the expert, so they were probably either laying some, checking on previously laid ones or going out to blow up a rogue one.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on December 22, 2010, 01:33:24 pm
More taxi passengers

For the forthcoming trip from Aden to Parim we have on board 20 sheep and fodder, 8 sick sailors, the envoy of the Shereif of Mecca and his retinue one French officer, and a partridge in a pear tree.

OK I added the partridge in a pear tree, but the rest are genuine. 

K
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: pliget on December 22, 2010, 02:12:22 pm
Only the Royal Navy ...  :)

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-34560/ADM%2053-34560-016_1.jpg

1600 Ceased coaling for tea
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on December 22, 2010, 02:22:54 pm
Re Joan of Arc.

Sorry Pliget, I missed your comment about why should the British commemorate Joan of Arc. The basic reason is guilt.
The English burnt her at Rouen for heresy because she had roused the French to fight against us. She claimed voices from God had caused her to come to the French court to raise an army to kick the English out of France.
We have felt guilty about it ever since.
George Bernard Shaw wrote a magnificent play about her shortly after her cannonisation in 1920.
There is the most remarkable church in the market place at Rouen on the site of the burning. http://saint-joan-of-arc.com/rouen.htm.
IMHO it is more impressive than the famous cathedral at Rouen.

K
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on December 22, 2010, 04:47:17 pm
H.M.S. Challenger has been recommissioned: 5 officers and 305 ratings went from ship and a new crew boarded. I hope I get quickly accustomed to the new scripture.
I could nor read what the 6 ~ joined for disposal are.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-37521/ADM53-37521-0135_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: pliget on December 22, 2010, 05:11:49 pm
supernumaries or personnel over the normal contingent
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on December 22, 2010, 05:32:14 pm
Thanks Pliget for your reading.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Press-ganged by the Swiss Navy on December 22, 2010, 06:27:21 pm
@ Haywain, @Janet Jaguar - thanks, that makes sense! I spent time in Chilean Patagonia in '94 and even hitched a life on an ex-British troopship that was then with the Chilean Navy. Spooky to think that 80 years before, British and German ships were chasing and sinking each other in those same waters. :-\

Meanwhile, on the way to the Med, Canopus came across a derelict wooden schooner which they tried to sink by ramming it. Oh and was very smelly!

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-69505/ADM%2053-69505-072_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on December 22, 2010, 11:50:25 pm
It must have been terrible, if they put something so insubstantial in the log!  Glad I wasn't there. :P
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: farrelly on December 23, 2010, 01:40:59 am
Reindeer meat for dinner!

Merry Christmas? yikes.  http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-34122/ADM53-34122-011_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on December 23, 2010, 02:02:38 am
It's a bit gruesome, thinking about eating Rudolf.  But he probably tasted good.  8)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: DJ_59 on December 23, 2010, 04:05:37 am

Ooo, is that ever a twisted image.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on December 23, 2010, 12:55:39 pm
I'm concerned about the ratings that were to be disposed of - that sounds like we could find them in the old Meadowlands stadium in New Jersey  ;D  (For those that may not be aware, the Mafia supposedly used the Meadowlands [which was an American football stadium] as a burial ground for its victims, particular Jimmy Hoffa, who was a labor union leader and who just disappeared one day.)

yours-

Kathy W.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on December 23, 2010, 09:25:20 pm
Too much wine is not good for health.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-37521/ADM53-37521-0151_1.jpg

I could not identify the word between "Forsyth" and "Royal Navy". Thanks for your help.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Caro on December 23, 2010, 09:37:30 pm
 ;D Forrest I think.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: kin47 on December 23, 2010, 10:21:46 pm
Lieutentant Commander Edward J. Forsyth-Forrest, seniority in rank 1 October 1916.

All best

don
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on December 23, 2010, 10:54:39 pm
Thanks Caro and Don
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on December 24, 2010, 08:06:57 am
Here's a distracted entry that made me laugh - HMS Danae just happens to be in the Chatham Dockyard at this time.  But some lieutenant thought time could be a place! ;D

I did transcribe exactly as written - hope it gives the analysis team a bit of a chuckle also.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Press-ganged by the Swiss Navy on December 24, 2010, 09:29:59 am
Ah, well plenty of distractions in Chatham for a young sailor with money in his pocket.... ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: jennfurr on December 24, 2010, 03:47:18 pm
Here's a distracted entry that made me laugh - HMS Danae just happens to be in the Chatham Dockyard at this time.  But some lieutenant thought time could be a place! ;D

I did transcribe exactly as written - hope it gives the analysis team a bit of a chuckle also.

That happened to me once too... when transcribing a weather entry, he had put something like 29.85 as the barometer, and 85 as the associated temperature... in the middle of winter!  all other entries were in the high 50's!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on December 24, 2010, 08:18:37 pm
Just goes to prove, no one's perfect.  :D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on December 30, 2010, 11:03:29 am
Who put ice around the thermometer?  ::) ::)

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-37521/ADM53-37521-0215_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on December 30, 2010, 02:17:55 pm
That one's particularly cute!  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: pliget on December 30, 2010, 05:51:08 pm
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-33655/ADM53-33655-154_1.jpg

Not so much a riveting entry as a riveting ship (no pun intended).
SS Fram was boarded at 0450 by HMS Andes whilst carrying "Metals and machinery" from New York to Bergen.

This the ship that took Nansen, Sverdrup and Amundsen on their Polar travels. Well, maybe it's another Fram but I still think the name is worth a mention. The Polar ship now rests in a museum in Oslo, open to the public.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: jennfurr on December 30, 2010, 07:55:47 pm
Who put ice around the thermometer?  ::) ::)

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-37521/ADM53-37521-0215_0.jpg

oh that's a good one!  Maybe it was a cold front like in the movie Day After Tomorrow?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on December 31, 2010, 07:09:04 am
Destroyer HMS Torch has just experienced 3 very sloppy days.  See the pictures below for details, but here is the summary:

Oct. 14th (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-63333/ADM%2053-63333-025_0.jpg), they lost a torpedo during exercises and had to spend hours looking for it.
Oct. 15th (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-63333/ADM%2053-63333-025_1.jpg), they kept looking, with divers.
Also on Oct. 15th, they lost overboard a very complex mock buoy.
Oct. 16th (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-63333/ADM%2053-63333-026_0.jpg), after further looking they had to give up.

No one's idea of fun.  What kind of torture do the other crews in the flotilla perpetrate on them after this mess?

EDIT:  This was added to their woes on Oct. 19th, making for a very, very bad week!!
     Drifter No.32 put hole in ship's side port side abreast 49 frame.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Press-ganged by the Swiss Navy on December 31, 2010, 08:23:57 am
that is class. You wouldn't want to be the guy that had to go and tell the Captain  :-\
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: pliget on December 31, 2010, 01:59:07 pm
Retribution is, um, not very swift at all.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-33656/ADM53-33656-006_0.jpg

On the 23 July 1917 Actg Sub Lieut Harold McCarthy RNR did wilfully obtain and make use of a free railway pass between Liverpool & Derby well knowing that he was not entitled to it.

One has to wonder how it was discovered.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on December 31, 2010, 02:14:40 pm
Truly, finding any evidence after 3 months discovering it at all must have been some kind of boasting to a buddy.

What I'm wondering about is the "Acting Sub Lieutenant" - how low is it possible for an officer to be demoted?  This can't have been his only problem! :P
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: jennfurr on December 31, 2010, 02:54:42 pm
that is class. You wouldn't want to be the guy that had to go and tell the Captain  :-\

"Uhhhh Captain - Sir? - we uhhhh ummmm lost a torpedo."
"Well go retrieve it, man!"
"Uhhhh Captain - Sir? - while looking for the torpedo, we lost a really complex buoy"
"No more grog for all!"
"Uhhhh Captain - Sir? - Drifter #32 just titanic'd us"
"Everyone to the brig!"
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: DJ_59 on December 31, 2010, 04:57:24 pm

Uhhhh Captain - Sir?  We uuuuh lost the Brig overboard as well.

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Haywain on January 01, 2011, 12:11:02 am
Retribution is, um, not very swift at all.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-33656/ADM53-33656-006_0.jpg

On the 23 July 1917 Actg Sub Lieut Harold McCarthy RNR did wilfully obtain and make use of a free railway pass between Liverpool & Derby well knowing that he was not entitled to it.

One has to wonder how it was discovered.

Unfortunately for Mr McCarthy, he failed to realise that things are actually audited - not a very intelligent fraud.  That would also lead to a criminal conviction, rather mucks up your life.

With regard to hi acting rank , presumeably he was a Midshipman.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on January 01, 2011, 12:14:05 am
Many young, new criminals are excessly stupid about it - they seem to think that breaking the law is always easy.  ::)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: jennfurr on January 01, 2011, 12:28:51 am
Many young, new criminals are excessly stupid about it - they seem to think that breaking the law is always easy.  ::)

Breaking the law is easy... it's once you get caught that things get hard!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on January 01, 2011, 12:32:17 am
Many young, new criminals are excessly stupid about it - they seem to think that breaking the law is always easy.  ::)
Breaking the law is easy... it's once you get caught that things get hard!
Correct - I'll reword this.  They think going totally unnoticed is easy, so they don't worry about being caught.  Which is both insulting and stupid in its own way.  (Professional criminals don't make the same mistake, unfortunately.)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on January 02, 2011, 03:09:22 pm
Sometimes it is good for the morale to have a concert and a football game and a visit by the O.O. Guard.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-37521/ADM53-37521-0250_1.jpg

Of this page I would say: Find the error!   Maybe "Jenny Wrens" distracted the copist.  ;D ;D

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-37521/ADM53-37521-0251_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on January 02, 2011, 10:26:40 pm
The HMS Challenger crew must have had a bad time mustering by open list and being read Articles of War and only the Boys had permission to go on land.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-37521/ADM53-37521-0258_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on January 02, 2011, 10:36:39 pm
Makes you wonder what's been happening below decks that didn't get into the previous logs.  ???
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Joke Slayer on January 03, 2011, 04:20:12 am
HMS Kent

20 March 1918

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-45613/ADM53-45613-109_0.jpg

11am - Divers searching for bullion lost overboard from SS Miltiades

3pm - Divers employed searching for box of bullion

4pm - Court of enquiry assembled on board to investigate loss of box of bullion from SS Miltiades

looks like someone is going to get in big trouble =/

21 March

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-45613/ADM53-45613-109_1.jpg

2pm - still looking

22 March

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-45613/ADM53-45613-110_0.jpg

still looking...
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: jennfurr on January 03, 2011, 04:36:49 am
uhoh... looks like a lot of people decided to take an extended vacation!

This is gonna take a while to enter!

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on January 03, 2011, 05:31:08 am
Joke Slayer,
there is also the Court Martial called on March 22!  :o  At least they knew who to blame!  And spending lots of time looking must have a very strong motivation. 

jennfurr,
is that a mutiny in the making?  ???  Why would that many crew all go to get drunk together, without a single cool head in the bunch of them?  You will have to keep us informed!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Joke Slayer on January 03, 2011, 05:34:11 am
Joke Slayer,
there is also the Court Martial called on March 22!  :o  At least they knew who to blame!  And spending lots of time looking must have a very strong motivation. 
I know, may not be related though

also I happened to miss the page with the 24th of March I believe it was, and after that there was no more mention of the incident =(
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on January 03, 2011, 05:38:40 am
The logs are frequently like that - if it doesn't affect the ship as a whole, they don't list it!  Very frustrating to us time-travelers. :(
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Press-ganged by the Swiss Navy on January 03, 2011, 02:57:06 pm


Of this page I would say: Find the error!   Maybe "Jenny Wrens" distracted the copist.  ;D ;D

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-37521/ADM53-37521-0251_0.jpg

Is that the top of the page says the ship is in Simonstown (South Africa), but then below it on the left it says what looks like 'Mozambique'? That's tricky ol' handwriting to decode
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on January 03, 2011, 07:06:03 pm
One of my favourites so far.

"Hands employed embarking on board 2 15 pdr field guns & limbers & 500 rounds ammunition. Also 2 tons medical stores and 1 horse. "

Mustnt forget the horse!

K
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on January 03, 2011, 07:59:55 pm
Quote from: Dread Pirate Roberts link=topic=209.msg8418#msg8418 date=1294066626
[/quote

Is that the top of the page says the ship is in Simonstown (South Africa), but then below it on the left it says what looks like 'Mozambique'? That's tricky ol' handwriting to decode

Your correct Pirate Roberts, HMS Challenger left Simonstown weeks ago and was about a week at Mozambique. I don't know which port it is as I found only the country but no harbour with this name.

Tegwen,

I hope they had a good and comfortable stable for the horse and that the voyage wasn't too long.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on January 03, 2011, 08:13:03 pm
No, Not far, just across the Red Sea from Port Sudan to Jeddah.
No mention of stabling, or of fodder this time. At least when we took some sheep they also loaded fodder.

K
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on January 03, 2011, 09:18:10 pm
H.M.S. Challenger must have a lazy crew, they lost some thing which I couldn't identify and a Lieutenant was reprimanded for loosing a skiff. What I find interesting is that the reprimand is written in red.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-37521/ADM53-37521-0259_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on January 03, 2011, 09:34:48 pm
Hi
My best guess for what was lost is

"deep sea lead & 100 fthm cable lost by accident"

Not sure about the word cable, but the rest looks right.

Any other thoughts?

I have never seen an entry in red. Damned careless to just mislay a skiff, so he probably deserved it!!!!
 
K

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on January 03, 2011, 09:44:59 pm
h.kohler, it's definitely "Deep sea lead & 100 fthms" something, probably cable or cord, lost by accident.  They must have been taking soundings in depth of the ocean and lost their grip on the end of it.

The skiff was lost while sailing, which means the lieutenant was a careless sailor/pilot of his craft.  He's probably glad to have survived the crash, but it is NOT likely to earn him the respect of the ratings under him or his fellow lieutenants! 
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on January 03, 2011, 10:02:13 pm
Thanks Tegwen and Janet for your comments.

It is the second time that I see an entry in red, the first was about an other Lieutenant from HMS Challenger who had too much wine. Captain Sykes, if I remember well his name, seems to like writing his reprimands in red. I am not sure if he is still on board because the ship was recommissioned but I don't remember exactly when, the only thing I remember is that it was is Simonstown.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on January 03, 2011, 10:07:34 pm
Sorry, I have done it again.

The "mislay" was a joke. I just dont like emoticons, but perhaps I should use them or stop making jokes.

K
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on January 03, 2011, 10:20:59 pm
Not necessary, but they help because we can none of us see the faces and hear the tone of voice that are normal clues.  I also get taken too seriously sometimes when I forget to use them. ;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on January 04, 2011, 12:09:10 am
The Foxglove has been playing with our friends.  The day before, the sloops went out together for firing practice and now this:
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-77629/ADM%2053-77629-0046_1.jpg (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-77629/ADM%2053-77629-0046_1.jpg)
 ;D :o
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Joke Slayer on January 04, 2011, 12:30:40 am
More from HMS Kent

2nd June

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-45613/ADM53-45613-153_0.jpg

9:55 close call

4th June

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-45613/ADM53-45613-154_0.jpg

a fair bit more eventful
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on January 04, 2011, 12:45:13 am
Good grief!! A near-missed collision, 2 exploding depth charges, and a damaged seaplane, all in one morning in a home port!! :o

Thank heavens most days aren't quite that hectic!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: dorbel on January 04, 2011, 08:35:03 am
Well we do often find interesting items of course, but I have transcribed nearly 2,000 pages and have yet to see a German ship! Admittedly two of my ships are peacetime navy, particularly the endlessly dull Foxglove as Wendolk highlights above. However, the log keeper does have immaculate if minute handwriting, restful after battling the illegible scrawl of Laconia.
Foxglove often meets the Insect class gunboats that patrolled the Yangtse and one does have to sympathise with the tars who went ashore with "Cockchafer" on their hat ribbons.
The crew of "Cricket" may be interested to see her last resting place at http://www.hmsfalcon.com/cricket/gallery8.htm
Happy transcribing all!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: farrelly on January 05, 2011, 10:41:28 pm
They're really feeling the pressure on Arlanza: a very clearly written 80.24 on Nov. 18th, 1916. :o
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on January 06, 2011, 03:55:42 am
HMS Torch had a very busy and embarassing morning, 14th March 1919!  We are in port at Constantinoble, Turkey, and were balancing our compass when we collided with a Turkish barque.

The good news is we were already secured to a tug, who promptly towed us out of danger.  And our maneuvers were being commanded by a Commander N. from Lord Nelson.  Does that keep the Lieutenant who is our ship's captain out of trouble?

It certainly would have been a learning experience to him, of what not to do while swinging your ship. :(
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on January 06, 2011, 09:45:14 am
Hi Janet

I am not an expert or even an ex sailor, but I read it that they finished swinging the ship under direction of Commander N, then they anchored. They started to drag the anchor and that bought them across the bows of the barque.

I think it would be the responsibility of the senior watch officer to ensure that they werent dragging anchor, so it is their fault.

Do any sailors know for sure whether it is possible to swing the ship for deviations while at anchor? I had assumed not.

K
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: JamesAPrattIII on January 06, 2011, 11:56:44 pm
Canopus at the battle of the falklands 8 december 1914 Severn vs the konigsberg 6 and 11 july 1915 especially the 11 july battle.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: ElisabethB on January 06, 2011, 11:59:53 pm
Hi James,
could you post a copy of the log page please. This surely sounds riveting.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on January 07, 2011, 09:14:25 am
A court of inquiry was held on board of Challenger but I don't know if there was any action taken as the log of the month of october 1918 is missing.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-37522/ADM53-37522-0018_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on January 07, 2011, 09:26:28 am
A court of inquiry was held on board of Challenger but I don't know if there was any action taken as the log of the month of october 1918 is missing.
Almost always, there are never any results in the logs.  Having the Court meet affects the rhythm of life on the ship, both by occupying space and demanding manpower.  But no lowly lieutenants are in there with them to find out what's happening, and the results never touch the crew.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on January 07, 2011, 09:38:23 am
Thanks Janet.

I didn't know that. Therefore we have to wait until 2017 to know the results as court decisions are not disclosed for 99 years (what I know of).
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on January 07, 2011, 08:06:23 pm
Yes. Unfortunately. :(
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: farrelly on January 08, 2011, 01:32:23 am
St. Elmo's fire:

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-34129/ADM53-34129-014_1.jpg

(How do you select & post only what shown in the magnifying widget?)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on January 08, 2011, 01:40:59 am
(How do you select & post only what shown in the magnifying widget?)
You have to have some kind of screenshot program that allows taking pictures of a part of what's on your screen.  Then you have to save on your computer and then upload as an attachment, or post it online at something the publishes online photo album and insert that into the message body.

The key is getting something that will photo it in the first place.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on January 08, 2011, 03:24:56 am
Torch recorded a 4 day long effort (http://forum.oldweather.org/index.php?topic=885.msg8838#msg8838) trying to tow a Russian destroyer very long distances, amounting a humongous list of lost materials and a stranded and abandoned Russian ship.  Very dramatic, I wrote it all out on the HMS Torch timeline and am giving you that link.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: farrelly on January 08, 2011, 05:58:37 pm
thanks, Janet Jaguar, x2! 

Kathy  8)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: jdulak on January 09, 2011, 06:06:55 pm
Just finished transcribing the HMS Kent's log pages for the battle of the Falkland Islands:

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-45610/ADM%2053-45610-042_1.jpg
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-45610/ADM%2053-45610-043_0.jpg
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-45610/ADM%2053-45610-043_1.jpg

As you can imagine it took quite some time and I could not have done it without the help of this site as a reference:

http://www.firstworldwar.com/battles/falklandislands.htm

John Dulak
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on January 10, 2011, 06:09:59 pm
After arriving at anchor in Monrovia H.M.S.Challenger fired 21 Salutes. The next day she fired 4 Salutes for Consuls and President's representative.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-37527/ADM53-37527-0014_1.jpg

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-37527/ADM53-37527-0015_0.jpg

P.S. On the first page there is a cross sign with four points whose meaning with the bower (an anchor) I did not understand
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: dorbel on January 10, 2011, 06:44:58 pm
Anchor bearings. When at anchor in a bay, the officer of the watch takes bearings on two, sometimes three local landmarks, so that the watch can refer to these later and see if they are where they are supposed to be. These bearings may also be required if there is some dispute later about where they anchored.
Here the officer has taken bearings on the lighthouse and the cape, presumably the last point of the cape.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: navalhistory on January 10, 2011, 07:27:47 pm
John (Dulak),

You might like to look at the official despatch, and British casualties and awards at http://www.naval-history.net/WW1Battle1412Falklands.htm

Gordon
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: jdulak on January 10, 2011, 08:03:13 pm
John (Dulak),

You might like to look at the official despatch, and British casualties and awards at http://www.naval-history.net/WW1Battle1412Falklands.htm

Gordon

Gordon:

Thanks for the link. I knew wnen I was transcribing the pages that I was not the first one to take a good long look at them. That was what led me to look for a "Cheat Sheet" to help sort it out.

John
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on January 10, 2011, 10:07:02 pm
Anchor bearings. When at anchor in a bay, the officer of the watch takes bearings on two, sometimes three local landmarks, so that the watch can refer to these later and see if they are where they are supposed to be. These bearings may also be required if there is some dispute later about where they anchored.
Here the officer has taken bearings on the lighthouse and the cape, presumably the last point of the cape.

Thanks Dorbel for your informations. At 56 still learning  :D :D :D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on January 11, 2011, 09:18:09 pm
"Yesterday" HMS Challenger was on her way back to England in 1919.

"Today" what was not my surprise to find her in Spithead on the 20th of July 1914 at a large Navy  exercise with the presence of the King.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-69573/ADM53-69573-006_1.jpg

From the first of August the crew was daily preparing the ship for battle and many officers and ratings where boarding.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-69573/ADM53-69573-012_1.jpg

Finally at 11.00 PM 4th of August, while on patrol between Searweatter and Foreland, orders to commence hostilities where received.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-69573/ADM53-69573-013_1.jpg

Her first day of war was quite eventful: One prize ship (Ullaboog) and one shot to S.S. Highgate.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-69573/ADM53-69573-014_0.jpg

 

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: farrelly on January 12, 2011, 12:20:13 am
Well, not exactly riveting, but a new one on me:

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-34137/ADM53-34137-008_1.jpg

[ 1 chief writer joined ship. ]  Anyone seen that before?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on January 12, 2011, 05:28:28 am
That is very curious.  Not only have I never heard of a writer onboard any ship, but a chief writer implies more than one of them there.

Hope some of our naval members can help explain this. :-\
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: dorbel on January 12, 2011, 12:20:38 pm
Writer ratings keep all the books aboard. Accounts, stores, personnel, anything really, as well as typing all the ships letters and despatches. A writer probably prepares the copies of the logs that we see. They are seamen, so have basic training in seaman skills, but "writing" is their speciality. A very large ship would certainly have a Chief Writer, but one imagines that a smaller ship would be managed by a PO Writer or even a Leading Writer.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: farrelly on January 12, 2011, 06:23:10 pm
How interesting!  Do you think the lovely and readable handwriting we see in some logs means the entries were more likely done by a writer?  That is, was legible handwriting a qualification?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: farrelly on January 14, 2011, 06:22:33 pm
Not riveting, but tantalizing:  (see entry for 11 AM)

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-34138/ADM53-34138-013_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on January 14, 2011, 07:02:16 pm
Not just tantalizing but frustrating!  No one should ever end a sentence, "...to enquire into    ." :P
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on January 14, 2011, 08:36:25 pm
A ship is salved, things are lost and a Funeral party is landed.
Quite an eventful day.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-37518/ADM%2053-37518-031_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on January 14, 2011, 08:55:43 pm
How frustrating!  When you think of all the very mundane entries which could have been left unfinished ....
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on January 14, 2011, 09:22:53 pm
I agree with you but I don't think that they had time for mundanities as they are in Duala, an occupied German colony, and surely the german population did not want to mix with English troops or officers.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: jdulak on January 14, 2011, 11:25:38 pm
Not just tantalizing but frustrating!  No one should ever end a sentence, "...to enquire into    ." :P

"Ending a sentence with a preposition is something up with which I will not put."  -  Winston Churchill

John
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: ElisabethB on January 14, 2011, 11:29:51 pm
 ;D, sorry !  ;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on January 15, 2011, 10:06:37 pm
A happy occasion on a dreadful time.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-37518/ADM%2053-37518-045_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: pliget on January 17, 2011, 01:42:30 pm
1040 Sir E. Shackleton & Captain came aboard

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-34544/ADM%2053-34544-003_1.jpg

This would be at the time of his failed expedition to cross Antarctica. He had retreated across the pack ice when his ship "Endurance" had been crushed in the ice in October 1915. In April 1916, having crossed the ice and sea, Shackleton and his party reached Elephant Island where he left most of his men. He set out with a few others in a lifeboat to try to reach the whaling station in South Georgia some 800 miles away and then made the first crossing of the S. Georgia mountains.

He made several attempts to rescue his men on Elephant Island, eventually succeeding in picking them up in August 1916.

There is a BBC tv series (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0272839/) on the expedition, with Kenneth Branagh as Shackleton, as well as a documentary (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0198559/) made in 1923.

All part of the legend of Shackleton who never lost a man on his expeditions to the Antarctic.

For an avid reader of all the Polar stories this is definitely the highlight of my travels with Oldweather!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: pliget on January 17, 2011, 02:18:17 pm
Coincidence (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-12202880)?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on January 17, 2011, 02:52:54 pm
1040 Sir E. Shackleton & Captain came aboard

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-34544/ADM%2053-34544-003_1.jpg

Truly astounding! 
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: dorbel on January 17, 2011, 09:00:48 pm
When they reached the whaling station on South Georgia, apparently their first question was, "When did the war end?"
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on January 18, 2011, 03:56:05 pm
Two interesting events:

First a Tornado is sighed.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-37518/ADM%2053-37518-082_0.jpg

Second convalescents are sent to a Sanatorium.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-37518/ADM%2053-37518-083_1.jpg

There are no informations on how many were on Sick List as there are no entries for a few weeks.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: LupusUK on January 22, 2011, 04:23:13 pm
Maybe not riveting, but quite interesting

HMS King Alfred
(http://i1215.photobucket.com/albums/cc506/LupusUK/Boxing.jpg)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Caro on January 22, 2011, 04:31:55 pm
I like the idea of a boxing competition being 'witnessed' LupusUK.
Welcome to the forum.  :D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on January 22, 2011, 06:35:20 pm
How interesting!  Do you think the lovely and readable handwriting we see in some logs means the entries were more likely done by a writer?  That is, was legible handwriting a qualification?

I never cease to be amazed at the lovely handwriting in some logs, and the less readable handwriting in others.  I must confess, Merlin's logs are for the most part very legible and readable, and that was a factor in my selecting that ship to work on. 
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on January 23, 2011, 01:03:03 am
Which of us would not wish to have been on board HMS Severn for this:
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: pliget on January 23, 2011, 07:14:34 pm
 :) :) :)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: farrelly on January 23, 2011, 09:35:24 pm
Empty lifeboats:  please see entries at 5 & 6 am.  Kind of haunting . . .

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-34146/ADM53-34146-014_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on January 23, 2011, 11:37:44 pm
ah, that one made me shiver!

yours,
Kathy
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on January 24, 2011, 06:47:09 pm
Here is something I found interesting - check out the last entry at the bottom of the page -
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-77629/ADM%2053-77629-0156_0.jpg

I think it is so different today - no one would refer to an outpost in a sovereign nation's territory like that anymore
yours -

Kathy

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on January 24, 2011, 07:16:29 pm
What a busy day:

Captain changed, officers boarding others leaving, Chief B~~~ and several ratings boarding and finally prepared for sea. H.M.S. Challenger has not moved since end of september 1914.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-37519/ADM%2053-37519-053_0.jpg

I forgot: Read Warrant N? 41
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: farrelly on January 24, 2011, 08:49:45 pm
Here is something I found interesting - check out the last entry at the bottom of the page -
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-77629/ADM%2053-77629-0156_0.jpg

I think it is so different today - no one would refer to an outpost in a sovereign nation's territory like that anymore
yours -

Kathy

I'm missing something here - Is this the page you meant to link to? Or am I, as I've been told, impossibly dense?

--another Kathy   ???
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: studentforever on January 24, 2011, 08:59:34 pm
12 th March - Challenger managed to lose a maxim gun with stand overboard. She buoyed it and sent divers down to hunt around on 13th. I'll keep you posted if she finds it.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on January 24, 2011, 09:03:31 pm
Yes, that is the log page - for the Foxglove, the log keeps referring to the British Consession - I know the British were granted some form of territorial control over parts of China.  I don't know, calling it a Consession just strikes my admitedly modern sensibilities as off somehow, as if China were not a sovereign state.  Of course, the America of that time was, to me, just as rude....  :D

I don't know - it just got to me for some reason.

yours-

Kathy W.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on January 24, 2011, 10:22:42 pm
I'm intrigued by entries related to diving after lost equipment or other things.  Didn't think scuba gear was developed before WWII; wondered what, if any, equipment they might have used.  A rope tied to someone's waist?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on January 24, 2011, 10:29:11 pm
I'm intrigued by entries related to diving after lost equipment or other things.  Didn't think scuba gear was developed before WWII; wondered what, if any, equipment they might have used.  A rope tied to someone's waist?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atmospheric_diving_suit

The picture alone explains why not all ships had a "diving party". :)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on January 24, 2011, 11:38:44 pm
Ratings' precis of "The King's Regulations and Admiralty Instructions for the Government of His Majesty's Naval Service" is followed by HMS Severn:

"If it moves, salute it; if it doesn't move ... "

Bunts
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on January 24, 2011, 11:44:58 pm
Every rating in the Navy must have "paint it" engraved on his brain for the rest of his life! ;D

Whatever did your crew to deserve having to "weigh by hand" that many times?  It must have felt like dire punishment.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on January 25, 2011, 12:22:43 am
They'd just had a supply of spinach.

It's not so bad as it might seem. HMS Severn is a shallow draft Monitor and is able to anchor in a saucer.

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on January 25, 2011, 02:26:41 am
OK. So how big is a bag?

Bunts
(HMS Severn)



Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: studentforever on January 25, 2011, 09:57:37 am
Quick update on Challengers lost overboard maxim gun - 'Dwarf divers down around maxim gun'.  Brings a whole Tolkein flavour to the episode.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on January 25, 2011, 01:50:42 pm
Meanwhile, it's all right for some ...

Bunts
(HMS Severn)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on January 25, 2011, 02:11:34 pm
"Nudge, nudge; wink, wink. Say no more."?

Bunts
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: farrelly on January 26, 2011, 12:46:54 am
Please see the 3 pm entry about lifeboats. 
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-34149/ADM53-34149-003_1.jpg

2 empty life boats sighted, then fired upon.  Did they think they were booby trapped?  any other explanations?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on January 26, 2011, 12:50:05 am
My first instinct is boredom?  Free targets to practice on?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on January 26, 2011, 02:02:50 am
My guess would be to remove them from the scene, so they would not attract any other ships to attempt a rescue. It would be a futile effort and perhaps put them in danger, if any u-boat decided to use them as bait.

Bunts
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Geoff on January 26, 2011, 08:33:45 am
One of the ships I'm following is the Capetown which spends a lot of time at Bermuda. Currently seems to be heading towards Cuba but received a signal from a schooner in distress - "Obsd schooner signal 'Have sprung a leak'". They connected a wire to it and towed it to safety.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-72547/ADM%2053-72547-093_0.jpg (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-72547/ADM%2053-72547-093_0.jpg)

Here's the next page of the saga:

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-72547/ADM%2053-72547-093_1.jpg (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-72547/ADM%2053-72547-093_1.jpg)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on January 26, 2011, 12:53:57 pm
I'm glad they got safely back to port.  Definitely an interesting 2 days for your crew. :)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on January 27, 2011, 07:35:02 pm
Naughty boys aboard my ship, opening their scuttles in dangerous waters! And one of them is an officer!

(http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-36586/ADM%2053-36586-012_1.jpg)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on January 28, 2011, 03:02:47 am
Yep, light can be dangerous.
Speaking of which ...

About a month ago HMS Severn (or it might have Mersey) carefully removed the outbuildings near the Ulenge Lighthouse. Then HMS Vengeance (or it might have been Challenger) joined in at greater range.
During the proceedings "somebody" punched Ulenge's light out.
HMS Severn returns to make restitution.

Bunts
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on January 28, 2011, 04:23:37 am
I just found that I have a worst confused log-keeper than most, time-wise.  On July 28th, 1920 (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-63344/ADM%2053-63344-017_0.jpg), he thought the dark of midnight was NOON. :o
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on January 28, 2011, 10:30:19 am
Not particularly riveting, I suppose, but another dramatic episode on my boring Northern Patrol: My ship just went through a massive hailstorm which lasted for nearly four days - force 10 pretty much throughout the entire first day. Several things got smashed up, including one of the senior officers, who was 'badly injured' (I wonder just how badly injured you have to be in order for it to be recorded as that), some ammunition got swept overboard, and part of the barometer apparently broke.
And now, after all that excitement, we're back at the dry dock in Glasgow, twiddling our thumbs (the log is almost blank now), doing partial weather readings and waiting for the ship, the barometer and Lieutenant Thompson to be patched up.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on January 28, 2011, 10:53:18 am
Could this be an attempt at insurance fraud?;)

Quote
[entry on 1 February]
1 pair binoculars lost overboard by accident (5 power) Omitted to enter it in log January 19th
Oh, and by the way, that barrel of rum we took on board last time? That totally went overboard as well...

Edit: Also, it looks as though we'll finally be getting those drains fixed: "One plumber joined ship".
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on January 28, 2011, 06:20:55 pm
I've never seen the front cover of a log like this before:

(http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-36573/ADM%2053-36573-001_0.jpg)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on January 28, 2011, 06:27:28 pm
Target practice gone wrong:

4.10 Stopped: Dropped target overboard.
4.15 Commenced target practice with 6'' guns.
4.50 Picked up target.
...
5.5 [i.e. when it's time for the next reading] Mercurial Barometer smashed by gun fire.

Somebody must have had a pretty poor aim there. ;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on January 28, 2011, 06:35:24 pm
What an awful shot!!

He he
K
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on January 28, 2011, 06:55:06 pm
What an awful shot!!

He he
K
Indeed. It was probably the sudden change from 1'' aiming rifles to 6'' guns that did it. Somebody got a bit overexcited at being able to fire proper guns for a change, it seems...

The crew generally seems more trigger-happy than they used to be. They've got into the habit of firing blank 3-pound charges at ships in order to stop them. Which seems a bit unnecessary to me, considering they're currently near Iceland and all the ships there are British trawlers from Grimsby...
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on January 28, 2011, 06:59:41 pm
Mutabilitie,
Target practice gone wrong:

4.10 Stopped: Dropped target overboard.
4.15 Commenced target practice with 6'' guns.
4.50 Picked up target.
...
5.5 [i.e. when it's time for the next reading] Mercurial Barometer smashed by gun fire.

Somebody must have had a pretty poor aim there.

Are you, perchance, aboard HMS Vengeance or HMS Challenger?
(see #264 in this thread.)
Could explain a lot.

Bunts
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on January 28, 2011, 07:03:50 pm
All my ships fire 3" blanks to stop ships. We occasionally fire a 4" live round if the blank doesnt work.

We havent hit a barometer yet.
K
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on January 28, 2011, 07:34:54 pm
Mutabilitie, Are you, perchance, aboard HMS Vengeance or HMS Challenger?
(see #264 in this thread.)
Could explain a lot.

Bunts
Heh. No, I'm on neither of those ships, and I don't recall having anyone on board who transferred from there either. Which is a bit of a shame, actually, because it would have made an even nicer story...

I suppose they might have been firing blanks all along, but the person who kept the log never bothered to record it until now.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on January 28, 2011, 07:36:38 pm
Mutabilitie,

Indeed. It was probably the sudden change from 1'' aiming rifles to 6'' guns that did it. Somebody got a bit overexcited at being able to fire proper guns for a change, it seems...

I'm sure you're being mischievous and expect that you know it's vibration from recoil & blast that do for glass and delicate instruments.
Aren't you?

Bunts
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on January 28, 2011, 07:49:05 pm
I'm sure you're being mischievous and expect that you know it's vibration from recoil & blast that do for glass and delicate instruments.
Aren't you?

Bunts
Yes, of course.;) After all, if they had actually hit the barometer with a 6'' gun, there would have been little chance of getting any more readings after that point, but it actually continued to work fine, so it was obviously just a bit of shattered glass.
I still found it amusing, though.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: ElisabethB on January 28, 2011, 07:57:29 pm
I must say that I really had a good laugh with the last postings. They were funny in a weird sort of way.  :D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: farrelly on January 29, 2011, 01:26:02 am
I just found that I have a worst confused log-keeper than most, time-wise.  On July 28th, 1920 (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-63344/ADM%2053-63344-017_0.jpg), he thought the dark of midnight was NOON. :o

Must be contagious:

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-34151/ADM53-34151-014_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on January 29, 2011, 01:34:22 am
You really gotta wonder about these young men - one thinks the dark of night in bright noon, the other thinks bright daylight is dark midnight!  What does the RN do to its officers? ::)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on January 29, 2011, 01:58:13 am
It's probably something to do with moving from northern to southern hemisphere & vice versa.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: farrelly on January 29, 2011, 02:43:16 am
Ah, yes, I forgot it's midnight there when it's noon up here . . .
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on January 29, 2011, 02:59:57 am
Ah, yes, I forgot it's midnight there when it's noon up here . . .
Going north to south? ???
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on January 29, 2011, 03:07:03 am
 ;D
You got it, Farrelly!
JJ - British humour, Goon Show etc.

Anyway ...
This is not as bad as it seems, when you realise that "Vengeance" should read "HMS Vengeance".
At least ... I hope that's what it means.

Bunts

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Geoff on January 29, 2011, 07:40:54 am
Something for the football fans!

From the HMS Capetown currently at La Libertad in El Salvador.

"Landed football party of 50 men for days trip to San Salvador"
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on January 29, 2011, 08:28:01 am
I've just come across a slightly weird entry:

"Flying Bruge" alongside for funeral party

We're in the Shetlands and have only been there for two days, and during that time (or even before then, for that matter) I'm certain that there was no mention at all of somebody dying or being seriously ill. So why are some of my crew off to a funeral now? ???
Edit: Oops, I just realised the supply ship is really called Flying Breeze. Oh well...
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on January 29, 2011, 08:53:44 am
I see funeral parties being sent off on occasion with no mention of someone being ill or dying - might be someone important from another ship, or onshore, and the ship feels they need to send representatives?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on January 29, 2011, 09:37:30 am
A Court Martial was held on board and the Court Martial Jack is hoisted.

The court Martial Jack is a flag hoisted at the yardarm to indicate that a Court Martial or a Court of inquiry is held on board of a ship while in harbor.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-37519/ADM%2053-37519-075_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on January 29, 2011, 03:12:34 pm
I see funeral parties being sent off on occasion with no mention of someone being ill or dying - might be someone important from another ship, or onshore, and the ship feels they need to send representatives?
Come to think of it, there's actually chance that this might have been Lieutenant Thompson, who got so badly injured during the storm. We left him in Glasgow, though, and I think Busta Voe is too far for the funeral party to have got there and back again in just a few hours.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on January 29, 2011, 03:38:31 pm
Actually, you can look if anyone from your ship died within the previous 3 days by checking here: http://www.naval-history.net/

If you know which other ships are in port with you - which most of us do not, since that is rarely logged - you can also read the list by date for any losses from them also.

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on January 29, 2011, 04:44:35 pm
Actually, you can look if anyone from your ship died within the previous 3 days by checking here: http://www.naval-history.net/

If you know which other ships are in port with you - which most of us do not, since that is rarely logged - you can also read the list by date for any losses from them also.
No, it seems that the only time anyone died on my ship was when it was torpedoed and sunk in June 1918. And none of those names ring any bells (unless assistant steward Bowren is identical to 'Commdr. Bowring', which I doubt). Then again, I suppose I wouldn't, because the only people who seem to get a mention in the log are officers, and the people on that list are all fairly low in rank.
Is this a complete list, by the way? There are only twelve names there, and I'm pretty sure the Reuters report at the time spoke of 15 casualties.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on January 29, 2011, 05:58:57 pm
Someone appears to have got himself a medal, although I don't really know how he managed that while pottering around the west coast of Iceland stopping trawlers...

Vice-Admiral Tupper came on board to present medal & inspect ships Company
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: farrelly on January 29, 2011, 08:00:34 pm
Not riveting, just anticlimactic.  Arlanza came back to Liverpool; guns, stores & medical supplies were removed, & the crew turned in their blankets.  Kind of sad, after following this ship for so long.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-34152/ADM53-34152-012_1.jpg

On the bright side, I've been bounced back to 1915, and I hope to find out more about how she came to be stuck in the ice for an entire winter - here's a clue I just found, though, and it goes a long way toward explaining why they were sounding the bilges every few hours -

http://www.seayourhistory.org.uk/component/option,com_gallery2/Itemid,402/?g2_itemId=7888

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on January 29, 2011, 08:18:53 pm
I find myself getting quite demotivated when I get whisked back to the beginning of the logs - there's the feeling that I've already been there, done that, and once I've got to the end of the logs I want a 'Ta-Da!' not January 1914. I'm finding it slow going the second time through!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on January 29, 2011, 08:29:25 pm
I find myself getting quite demotivated when I get whisked back to the beginning of the logs - there's the feeling that I've already been there, done that, and once I've got to the end of the logs I want a 'Ta-Da!' not January 1914. I'm finding it slow going the second time through!
Can't you just switch to a different ship now that you've got to the end already?

In other news: unlike Christmas, Good Friday does seem to be celebrated on board. A 'Chaplin' just came over from another ship and conducted a divine service and holy communion.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on January 29, 2011, 08:34:53 pm
I could switch to a different ship, but I like to finish a ship before I move on. Plus, my captaincy isn't secure, so while there are more logs to do I want to do them! But doing odd log pages here and there that were (for whatever reason) missed out on my first run through isn't as thrilling as following the story of the ship for the first time.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on January 29, 2011, 08:43:20 pm
So you only get to see the ones you missed out the first time, but you don't actually have to start again from scratch?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on January 29, 2011, 08:45:31 pm
Indeed. I don't think anyone's really sure why some get missed out first time through, possibilities are that they were seen by someone else, but haven't yet been seen three times, or that the pages were scanned out of order.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on January 29, 2011, 08:52:14 pm
Right. Well, I'll see once I get there, I suppose.

Some muppet on my ship seems to have decided to do hourly (partial) readings for no obvious reason.:(
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on January 29, 2011, 08:55:17 pm
Just wait until they get especially bored and decide that 30-minute readings are in order. It has the benefit of getting you closer to captaincy though!  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: farrelly on January 29, 2011, 09:33:39 pm
I don't mind going back in time on Arlanza - it's only back to May, 1915, and I started in December, 1915 (I think.)  When I started she was stuck in ice and remained that way until June, then limped back to England with a tug because she couldn't steer, stopping to tie on the bow plates with wire!

I have always wondered why she was stuck there (in the White Sea), although that photo & caption posted above pretty much tells the story. 

When I went back in time on Leviathan, though, I was doing the exact same logs I had already done, so that's when I switched ships.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on January 29, 2011, 09:37:20 pm
If you're sure you were given the same logs twice, you need to let Arfon know - it shouldn't happen. Often, though, you miss out the odd page when you go through for the first time, and then when you go back you do the ones that you missed. You shouldn't ever see the same log page twice.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: farrelly on January 29, 2011, 09:43:13 pm
I was definitely seeing pages I had already done (Leviathan) - the log entries were appearing in the drop-down menus. It happened on several pages in a row before I was sure. I mentioned it in the tech support part of the forum in December (see post #6) & DJ responded that it was being looked into.  After that, I'm afraid I merely deserted (!) the ship, though, and didn't continue to follow the tech support thread.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on January 29, 2011, 09:46:41 pm
Fair enough then  :)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on January 29, 2011, 09:52:58 pm
farrelly,
The question first is, are they truly repeats?  If yes, then Arfon should be told. 

Or are they duplicate copies?  This happens frequently, an error by the original log-keepers, not our scanners, because of the normal copying routines used by the RN.  We find it useful, in checking for original errors, to have both copies.  Can you give us JPG links to at least some of the repeating pages?

The issue has been discussed many times - because it happened often.  Try going to the forum's home page and search for "duplicate page". Bunches of stuff come up which might help.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: farrelly on January 29, 2011, 10:09:55 pm
They could definitely be duplicate copies; I don't know how I would be able to tell.  If that's a possibility, then it's probably what happened.   ???  Occam's razor? (there should be an emoticon for that -- a little face with a tiny band-aid . . . )

I don't know how I could find the pages - this was back in real-time December and two years' worth of Arlanza logs ago.  I went to the "transcribe logs" page for Leviathan, and then "My old weather", but I was only shown pages from Arlanza.  The probable duplicate pages would have been the last pages I did on Leviathan.

Didn't mean to cause a tempest.  And I've posted this in the wrong place, too.  :-X
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on January 29, 2011, 10:15:44 pm
Everything's fine.  Just go back to having fun. ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on January 29, 2011, 11:25:34 pm
Just wait until they get especially bored and decide that 30-minute readings are in order. It has the benefit of getting you closer to captaincy though!  ;D
Ugh, don't give them ideas. Hourly readings are quite enough. Just what is so interesting about the water temperature near Iceland that it needs constant checking? It doesn't even vary that much!

Edit: Oh, right, I think I get it now. 32 F = 0 C, right? The last readings have been quite low, all in the 34-36 F region, so I suppose they must be getting anxious they might get stuck in ice (or at least anxious to demonstrate via the log that they took all the necessary precautions not to get stuck).
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: DJ_59 on January 30, 2011, 12:40:07 am

The theory of CYA.  Definitely in practice in any military branch anywhere.

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on January 30, 2011, 08:27:14 am
Not exactly riveting, but mildly amusing: My current log-keeper seems to have a bit of a spelling problem which involves not knowing which words need extra e's and which don't. He put down a ship's name as 'HMS Spriteley' (which he then emended to 'Sprightley') and stated that the ship had 'weighd & proceeded'.:D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on January 30, 2011, 03:08:02 pm
I think the worry about sailing in seas that are near freezing is not so much getting stuck as icing. This is where sea spray lands on the rigging, superstructure etc and freezes, gradually building up to the point where the ice is so heavy that the ship can be made unstable. Ships have been lost due solely to this problem.

HTH
K
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on January 30, 2011, 03:20:59 pm
I think the worry about sailing in seas that are near freezing is not so much getting stuck as icing. This is where sea spray lands on the rigging, superstructure etc and freezes, gradually building up to the point where the ice is so heavy that the ship can be made unstable. Ships have been lost due solely to this problem.

HTH
K
Good point, although wouldn't the air temperature be just as relevant for that as the water temperature?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on January 30, 2011, 04:48:03 pm
After over a year of constantly examining ships and never finding anything suspicious, it looks as though we've finally caught someone (even if it's only 'enemy females'):
Boarded Danish s/s Oscar ii from New York to Copenhagen General Cargo. 17 Enemy females. 545 bags of mails for Germany. Steamer steering 61?. Sent to Kirkwall with armed guard in charge of Lieut Reitwick RNR of HMS Ebro.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on January 30, 2011, 05:10:31 pm
I think the worry about sailing in seas that are near freezing is not so much getting stuck as icing. This is where sea spray lands on the rigging, superstructure etc and freezes, gradually building up to the point where the ice is so heavy that the ship can be made unstable. Ships have been lost due solely to this problem.

HTH
K
Good point, although wouldn't the air temperature be just as relevant for that as the water temperature?

I guess that both are important. Are they not recording air temperatures regularly as well?
K
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on January 30, 2011, 05:19:19 pm
I guess that both are important. Are they not recording air temperatures regularly as well?
K
No, air temperature was just measured six times a day, but water temperature every hour.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on January 30, 2011, 07:20:14 pm
There is another theory. This is the universal punishment theory. If we cant explain anything any other way we decide that it must be to punish a midshipman who has got a bit above himself.

I cant imagine anything worse than dunking a thermometer overboard every hour on a bucking warship where the sea temperatures are close to freezing, so in the absence of any other sensible theory this must be it.

K
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on January 30, 2011, 09:19:46 pm
H.M.S Pioneer was mentioned in the log of H.M.S. Challenger and I wondered who she was as she is not in the Naval-History list.

Within two clicks I found her and I think what I found will please our Australian mates.

http://www.navy.gov.au/HMAS_Pioneer
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on January 30, 2011, 11:18:04 pm
Oh look, it rhymes! ;D
Quote
'Steaming in station with HMS Alsation'
(The typo is original).
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on January 31, 2011, 09:42:37 am
Investigating ice pack.
Now is it just me or does that sound as though they've simply opened the freezer door?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on January 31, 2011, 03:22:03 pm
Does anyone from the Gnat know what this is all about? (See the 10:00 am entry)

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-77618/ADM%2053-77618-0020_0.jpg

yours -

Kathy W.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: ElisabethB on January 31, 2011, 08:51:10 pm
Does anyone from the Gnat know what this is all about? (See the 10:00 am entry)

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-77618/ADM%2053-77618-0020_0.jpg

yours -

Kathy W.

Hi Kathy,
I seem to remember a Court of Enquiry around that time but no mention (as usual) what is was all about, sorry.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on January 31, 2011, 09:16:12 pm
Did you perhaps have any collisions around that time? My ship once collided with another patrol ship and got damaged, and as soon as we returned to Glasgow, a court of enquiry turned up. It was actually held on my ship, and as far as I remember, they did stay for quite a while, but there were no details about the actual proceedings.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: ElisabethB on January 31, 2011, 09:35:49 pm
Nope, the Gnat is a very uneventfull ship. I would've remembered a collision.  ;)
But this has happened before on other ships : nothing happens, all of a sudden there is a Court of Enquiry, no reason mentioned and nothing whatsoever the day or days after.  ???
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on January 31, 2011, 10:11:59 pm
These log keepers are without a doubt the most frustrating people I have to deal with - I have 3 teenagers, so that is saying a lot!!!! ;D ???

yours -

Kathy W.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: ElisabethB on January 31, 2011, 10:29:07 pm
point taken   ;) ;D  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: ElisabethB on January 31, 2011, 10:30:11 pm
Oh look, it rhymes! ;D
Quote
'Steaming in station with HMS Alsation'
(The typo is original).
Nice !  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on January 31, 2011, 11:05:36 pm
Oh look, it rhymes! ;D
Quote
'Steaming in station with HMS Alsation'
(The typo is original).
Nice !  ;D
It's just a bit of a shame about the 'HMS' messing up the metre. 's/s' or something would have been even nicer.:(
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on January 31, 2011, 11:32:03 pm
I've discovered that my holiday ship not only carries a balloon (some kind of weather balloon, it seems), but also recently took a 'seaplane' on board, probably for similar purposes. They were dying to have a trial flight, but so far the weather has never been quite right for that. Today it finally worked, though.:)
Edit: I just found an interesting article about it: http://www.naval-history.net/WW1Book-NavyEverywhere01.htm#XII
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on February 01, 2011, 12:35:13 am
mutabilitie,
You're on Manica?
Then that balloon is for an observer to report fall of shot. Less things to go wrong than with them newfangled airyplanes.
Thanks from HMS Mersey & Severn for your help against the Konigsberg and at Saadani, Tanga et al.

Bunts
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on February 01, 2011, 01:24:10 am
View from HMS Severn's Bridge:

"C'mon, boy! Walkies!"

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: farrelly on February 01, 2011, 02:04:35 am
"escexcising" ??  kudos to you for deciphering it!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on February 01, 2011, 02:32:55 am
Ah, farrelly,
You've made me realise my age!
I've almost always known "x" to be handwritten looking like "sc". "They" tried to get me to write it in that style, nearly six decades ago, but I soon grew out of it.
It didn't occur to me that it could have been construed as anything other than an "x".
"Nurse! He's not my grandson!"
 ;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on February 01, 2011, 07:08:23 am
It's nothing to do with age - in maths, an x is like an s and a c, to avoid it looking like 'multiply'.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on February 01, 2011, 09:52:58 am
mutabilitie,
You're on Manica?
Then that balloon is for an observer to report fall of shot. Less things to go wrong than with them newfangled airyplanes.
Thanks from HMS Mersey & Severn for your help against the Konigsberg and at Saadani, Tanga et al.

Bunts
It's only my holiday ship, really. I wanted something as radically different from the Northern Patrol as possible, and the Manica certainly fits the bill.;)
I did read about what the balloon was really for after posting that, although they do seem to be unusually interested in describing the weather conditions. Perhaps they'e just incredibly bored out there...
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on February 01, 2011, 09:55:09 am
Ah, farrelly,
You've made me realise my age!
I've almost always known "x" to be handwritten looking like "sc". "They" tried to get me to write it in that style, nearly six decades ago, but I soon grew out of it.
It didn't occur to me that it could have been construed as anything other than an "x".
"Nurse! He's not my grandson!"
 ;)
Pff, I was taught to write x's like that as well, and I'm not *that* old.
I didn't attend school in the UK, though, so obviously I was taught to write a different type of script. (I'm not just making excuses here, honest...)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on February 01, 2011, 04:16:36 pm
Is it just me or does the Manica log-keeper occasionally have a very odd way of writing 'fresh'? :-\ (See 8am weather description).
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-48166/ADM%2053-48166-015_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on February 01, 2011, 04:40:11 pm
a very odd way of writing 'fresh'?

Oo-er.
I'm glad I didn't have to transcribe that.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on February 01, 2011, 04:44:18 pm
a very odd way of writing 'fresh'?

Oo-er.
I'm glad I didn't have to transcribe that.
Thankfully I know it means fresh, because I've transcribed enough pages to know he's got a pretty weird way of writing e's and r's (and the fact that he alternates between two different letter shapes for both e and r doesn't make it any easier). It does look as though we've got Gordon Ramsey on board, though...;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: farrelly on February 01, 2011, 07:36:14 pm
re "fresh":  I'm sorry to say that looks rather like my own handwriting - the "r" & "e" are squeezed up so you can't tell the difference, except from context. 

Good thing these forum entries are typed . . .
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on February 02, 2011, 01:29:14 am
# Here come the Girls ... #
It must be "Jam and Jerusalem" time.

"Barjora arrived with W.I. Regt."

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on February 02, 2011, 05:14:41 pm
The Foxglove participated in a rescue mission!

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-77619/ADM%2053-77619-0006_0.jpg

I love the last entry on the list of things lost in the rocks  ;D ;D

yours -

Kathy W.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on February 02, 2011, 05:40:49 pm
I wonder how long it took to empty them before they became suitable buoyancy aids?
Well done Jolly Jack Tar; always able to improvise.


Bunts
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on February 02, 2011, 06:08:28 pm
I'm guessing there were a lot of volunteers to help with that task!  ;D

If there was any Coke around, I know I'd help with it  ;) ;D

yours -

Kathy
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on February 03, 2011, 09:23:45 am
"... parted company with vengeance".;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: dorbel on February 03, 2011, 09:32:56 am
After observing an annular eclipse on 3/12/18 off the coast of Chile, "Ophir" on the next day observed "a distinct disturbance felt throughout the ship" while in 120 fathoms.
Later in the day they stopped engines to avoid a school of whales, so perhaps they had struck one earlier.
Some excitement in what has otherwise been an excruciatingly dull cruise. We also "logged" another temp. eng. Sub-Lt for being drunk. Just how many temp. eng. subs does a ship have and why are they prone to drinking themselves into a stupor? It's all very strange.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on February 03, 2011, 09:38:30 am
After observing an annular eclipse on 3/12/18 off the coast of Chile, "Ophir" on the next day observed "a distinct disturbance felt throughout the ship" while in 120 fathoms.
Later in the day they stopped engines to avoid a school of whales, so perhaps they had struck one earlier.
Some excitement in what has otherwise been an excruciatingly dull cruise. We also "logged" another temp. eng. Sub-Lt for being drunk. Just how many temp. eng. subs does a ship have and why are they prone to drinking themselves into a stupor? It's all very strange.
Presumably you've got so many of them because they're always drinking themselves into a stupor. That's why they never make it past the 'temp.' stage...
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on February 03, 2011, 05:07:26 pm
After observing an annular eclipse on 3/12/18 off the coast of Chile, "Ophir" on the next day observed "a distinct disturbance felt throughout the ship" while in 120 fathoms.
Later in the day they stopped engines to avoid a school of whales, so perhaps they had struck one earlier.
Some excitement in what has otherwise been an excruciatingly dull cruise. We also "logged" another temp. eng. Sub-Lt for being drunk. Just how many temp. eng. subs does a ship have and why are they prone to drinking themselves into a stupor? It's all very strange.

Was the position of your ship close to 26?S, 71?W?
If so they might have felt a 7.8 Earthquake but I doubt it as I do not know if earthquakes can be felt on board of a ship in a shallow sea. According to UGS on 4/12/1918 there was a quake at that position.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on February 03, 2011, 08:55:37 pm
"... parted company with vengeance".;)

Was this a quote from a log?  Who was parting?  What was the cause of the vengeful feelings?  [Inquiring minds want to know!] :o
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: ElisabethB on February 03, 2011, 08:58:20 pm
"... parted company with vengeance".;)

Was this a quote from a log?  Who was parting?  What was the cause of the vengeful feelings?  [Inquiring minds want to know!] :o

Probably the HMS Vengeance  ;) ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on February 03, 2011, 09:43:55 pm
"... parted company with vengeance".;)

Was this a quote from a log?  Who was parting?  What was the cause of the vengeful feelings?  [Inquiring minds want to know!] :o

Probably the HMS Vengeance  ;) ;D
Of course. And it was the Manica doing the parting. Actually the most remarkable thing about that entry is that the log-keeper managed to spell 'vengeance' correctly. The previous one kept writing 'HMS Vengance', even though he was seeing that ship on a near-daily basis. You'd think that would have enabled him to spell its name!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: farrelly on February 03, 2011, 10:36:20 pm
The crew of Arlanza have been having unending problems with the patent long - hauling it in on a daily basis (or more often) to reset it to "0".

But now - problem solved - see 9 am entry:

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-34114/ADM53-34114-011_0.jpg

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on February 03, 2011, 10:42:43 pm
The only question remaining is, did the rating that threw in target happen to be one of the ratings that was fed up with the troublesome log? ??? :)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: farrelly on February 03, 2011, 10:53:08 pm
I don't know the answer to that one - but the officers who had to keep making log entries about it must have been tired of it.  I stopped transcribing all the "malfunction" entries.  When I first looked at this entry without the magnifier, I thought it said they shot it instead of the target. 

This was a much more elegant solution.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on February 04, 2011, 02:03:50 am
I've had at least four patent logs lost;
one overboard "by accident", one washed away in stormy conditions (both "with gear") and two when the string broke.

B
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on February 04, 2011, 03:00:27 am
Having spent 30+ years in factory management, I can tell you that deliberate loss of hated instruments is rarely that natural looking and camoflaged!  It's more likely to be dramatically smashed, and every person in the vicinity of the accident will look cherubically innocent while stating they had not seen it happen.

I think it has to do with venting emotions.  Hitting the thing with a thrown target would be very much in character.  Simply snapping the line is too smooth and unsatisfying. ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on February 04, 2011, 08:17:15 pm
HMS Espiegle is off an obscure island in the Red Sea in 1922 without much to do

HMS Crocus arrives and what happens next. See the 01.30 entry.
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-77067/ADM%2053-77067-0023_1.jpg

Concert party returns from "Crocus".

I havent seen any other entries for any of my ships that indicate that they had long nights.

Normally leave parties etc are on board by 10pm.

Dirty Stop outs, but I expect they deserved a good party for a change.
K
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: farrelly on February 05, 2011, 01:43:20 am
they never tell us the good stuff - so WHY are the men refusing to work? (see 2-3 pm)

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-34115/ADM53-34115-004_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: studentforever on February 05, 2011, 09:15:26 pm
Towards the end of May 1915 Challenger sent a party of marines and another of stokers off to a sanatorium while she was in dry dock. Right at the end of the month 3 ratings were returned (without thanks) from the sanatorium for discipline. As in so many cases we are left guessing although two warrants were read out later.  Does anyone know whether these records will be released in a few year's time? They would make fascinating reading.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on February 06, 2011, 05:59:41 pm
There's a new log-keeper who keeps writing down 'noon' and 'midt' at the appropriate times. What is that all about? I mean, noon and midnight tend to happen every day, at the same time, so there's hardly any point in recording that fact in the log, no?:-\
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on February 06, 2011, 08:38:46 pm
Towards the end of May 1915 Challenger sent a party of marines and another of stokers off to a sanatorium while she was in dry dock. Right at the end of the month 3 ratings were returned (without thanks) from the sanatorium for discipline. As in so many cases we are left guessing although two warrants were read out later.  Does anyone know whether these records will be released in a few year's time? They would make fascinating reading.
I believe all Naval Court records are under a 100 year seal, while the logs were only under a 50 year seal.  If that's true, you can try to look at those records in 2016.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: dorbel on February 07, 2011, 07:58:09 am
Was the position of your ship close to 26?S, 71?W?
If so they might have felt a 7.8 Earthquake but I doubt it as I do not know if earthquakes can be felt on board of a ship in a shallow sea. According to UGS on 4/12/1918 there was a quake at that position.

Thanks H. Kohler, they gave their position as 24  48S, 70  53W and the time as 7-50am, so if the timing is the same that is clearly it. You most certainly can feel an earthquake in a vessel as I have experienced it myself and one as large as 7.8 would be felt much further away than this.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on February 07, 2011, 04:50:19 pm
There's a new log-keeper who keeps writing down 'noon' and 'midt' at the appropriate times. What is that all about? I mean, noon and midnight tend to happen every day, at the same time, so there's hardly any point in recording that fact in the log, no?:-\
If that does not interest you (and it  certainly wouldn't interest me), then don't transcribe it.  The historians are the ones in love with the notes we transcribe, so the secondary standard - after your own interests are considered - is, would a historian consider this to be even slightly historic?  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on February 07, 2011, 05:10:44 pm
Hi Dorbel

I made further research on this quake as the database I used didn't give the time. I found other datas on this earthquake giving also the time when it took place which was 11-47 AM.

The shock felt still remains a mistery  :-\ :-\
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: dorbel on February 07, 2011, 05:27:31 pm
On the contrary HK, you have nailed it. I expect that your 11-47am is GMT, while the "Ophir" would have been on local time like any Royal Navy vessel. In this instance that would be about GMT -4.
No doubt some historian will be pleased with us one day. In the meantime we must be content with the quiet satisfaction of a job well done, or a smug grin as it sometimes known. Well done sir!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on February 08, 2011, 06:23:27 pm
There's a new log-keeper who keeps writing down 'noon' and 'midt' at the appropriate times. What is that all about? I mean, noon and midnight tend to happen every day, at the same time, so there's hardly any point in recording that fact in the log, no?:-\
If that does not interest you (and it  certainly wouldn't interest me), then don't transcribe it.  The historians are the ones in love with the notes we transcribe, so the secondary standard - after your own interests are considered - is, would a historian consider this to be even slightly historic?  ;D
Oh no, I just found it vaguely amusing; I wasn't planning to transcribe it! To be honest, if some historian happens to be incredibly interested in the more boring, everyday work on a ship - tough. He'll just have to sift through the logs himself (and he will, because he won't trust our transcripts to be sufficiently accurate anyway).
Unless I'm given very specific instructions as to what I should / shouldn't be transcribing, though, I'll just stick with the "whatever strikes you as remotely interesting" rule - and everything weather-related, obviously.;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: ElisabethB on February 08, 2011, 10:55:49 pm
Brilliant,
that is just what the scientists (he or she)  involved are looking at  !
 ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on February 09, 2011, 06:42:02 pm
Finally, a bit of excitement on Rinaldo!  Just arriving at N Fanjove Island, and a canoe has 'returned with native spies'.  Presumably they're going to supply the crew with information about the Germans, who I guess are the enemy round here?

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-57890/ADM%2053-57890-004_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on February 09, 2011, 07:01:31 pm
helenj,

Keep an eye on them. They wanted to tell us that the Konigsberg had sunk. We already knew; we (Mersey & Severn) sank her.
More excitement to come, watch out for HMS Manica with her balloon on a string.

Bunts
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on February 09, 2011, 09:37:50 pm
What on earth is Manica doing with a balloon on a string?  It sounds very frivolous - I'll certainly keep my eyes open, though I don't think we've ever met so far.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Lancsgreybeard on February 09, 2011, 10:49:14 pm
Manica is a balloon ship which also carries a seaplane.

From the logs it is difficult to see what they are achieving and the seaplane in 1916 appears to be very "experimental" spending a lot of time being hoisted out and back again with mechanical failure, it does get airborne and along with the balloon would be able to provide good intelligence.

They were both active at the bombardment of Bagamoyo and subsequent shelling activities but no information has been given (yet) about any intelligence they may have been able to obtain.

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on February 10, 2011, 12:16:13 am
Manica is a balloon ship which also carries a seaplane.

From the logs it is difficult to see what they are achieving and the seaplane in 1916 appears to be very "experimental" spending a lot of time being hoisted out and back again with mechanical failure, it does get airborne and along with the balloon would be able to provide good intelligence.

They were both active at the bombardment of Bagamoyo and subsequent shelling activities but no information has been given (yet) about any intelligence they may have been able to obtain.
There was nothing helpful on any of the pages I transcribed either.:( If it wasn't for the odd mention of shots being fired on the shore and a note about some other ship firing shots at Bagawhatsit, you would think they really were flying that balloon of theirs just for fun!

By the way, if it wasn't included in the ship's log, where did they note down the results of their balloon-flying? Did they keep a separate balloon-log, or what? ??? I mean, surely there must have been some findings to justify faffing about with that balloon (and doing precious little else) for months?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on February 10, 2011, 01:06:30 am
Lgb

From the logs it is difficult to see what they are achieving and the seaplane in 1916 appears to be very "experimental" ...

They were both active at the bombardment of Bagamoyo and subsequent shelling activities but no information has been given (yet) about any intelligence they may have been able to obtain.
 

Earlier than that, they were instrumental in the sinking of the Konigsberg upstream of the Rufigi Delta. The bombarding ships Mersey, Severn & others more distant, couldn't see the target.
An official report here (http://www.naval-history.net/WW1Battle1507KonigsbergAction.htm)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Lancsgreybeard on February 10, 2011, 09:35:51 am
Thank you for that link

LGB
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on February 10, 2011, 09:47:29 pm
From the log of HMS Espiegle. 1/8/1922, in Basra
See the 11pm entry
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-77067/ADM%2053-77067-0039_0.jpg

Lost overboard by accident - 1 Bosun's Call

I understand that this is another name for the Bosun's whistle.

Bit of peace & quiet for a while unless he had a spare!!
K

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: ElisabethB on February 10, 2011, 09:50:53 pm
From the log of HMS Espiegle. 1/8/1922, in Basra

Lost overboard by accident - 1 Bosun's Call

I understand that this is another name for the Bosun's whistle.

Bit of peace & quiet for a while unless he had a spare!!
K
;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on February 10, 2011, 10:51:25 pm
This is the first mention I've seen of "frozen" produce (Oct 1916).
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-59849/ADM%2053-59849-006_1.jpg
I discovered that, after experimental systems as far back as the 1870s, the first commercially successful "refrigerated ship", the Dunedin, was operating as early as 1882.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dunedin_(ship)
A steam powered chiller on a sailing ship.  :o

Verily, life is full of surprises.
 
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on February 10, 2011, 11:27:59 pm
That is so interesting!  Thanks. :)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on February 11, 2011, 02:38:51 am
For medicinal purposes, obviously.

Nice writing, too.
"Look on my words, ye mighty, and despair!"
(apology to P. B. Shelley)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Press-ganged by the Swiss Navy on February 11, 2011, 07:52:15 am
blimey, that should keep the scurvy away  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Geoff on February 11, 2011, 09:19:04 am
A death at sea. A stoker, John James Davy/Day, died and was consigned to the deep. No mention of cause of death.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-60720/ADM%2053-60720-076_0.jpg (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-60720/ADM%2053-60720-076_0.jpg)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Caro on February 11, 2011, 12:19:03 pm
Thanks Geoff. John James Day is listed on naval-history.net as dying of illness.
I'll put a copy of this in the Burials at sea thread.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Caro on February 11, 2011, 12:53:29 pm
This is the first mention I've seen of "frozen" produce (Oct 1916).
I discovered that, after experimental systems as far back as the 1870s, the first commercially successful "refrigerated ship", the Dunedin, was operating as early as 1882.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dunedin_(ship)
A steam powered chiller on a sailing ship.  :o

Verily, life is full of surprises.

You're a star on twitter bunts.  ;D

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on February 11, 2011, 01:48:37 pm
Eeek!
I knew not this "twitter" of which you speak.
To avoid the possibility of confusion, I have no existence other than here.
I hereby state and declare that any manifestation elsewhere is devoid of association with me. e.g.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on February 11, 2011, 02:50:42 pm
There was a Royal Fleet Auxiliary ship named the Frozen Orange Peel  ;D, which in my opinion is the BEST SHIP'S NAME EVER!!!  I assume it was a refer (for refrigerator) ship. 

Also, I think there is the beginnings of a great drink in that rum and lime juice - I think I'll try to come up with an Old Weather this weekend...  ;D

yours -

Kathy W.


Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on February 11, 2011, 10:39:48 pm
An entry that made me anxious to know what kind of damage H.M.S. Severn suffered. Could someone from her tell how it occured and what was the damage?

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-37519/ADM%2053-37519-130_0.jpg

And MAN OVERBOARD!!!
Fortunately safe and sound back on board.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-37519/ADM%2053-37519-130_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on February 12, 2011, 12:21:25 am
Sorry, HK,

I've sent off that log to the Admiralty, and for reasons of confidentiality ... (my completed pages don't go back that far.)
Let me think.
I'm working both Mersey & Severn (they're twins, you know). For my age, my memory isn't bad; but by other standards it's poor.
One of the twins bumped into (and sank) an Italian battleship's pinnace. (Not sure which hit whom but a pinnace wouldn't do much damage that couldn't be cured by a coat of paint.)
One squished a dry dock gate, damaging one of her stanchions. I fancy that would be it. Chippies would fix that.

Sorry I can't help further. If anything else occurs to me, I'll let you know, but my memory's not too good. Did I mention that?  ;)

Bunts
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on February 12, 2011, 01:06:30 am
Thanks Bunts for your effort and help.

I'll call the admiralty to know where they've hidden the missing log.  :)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on February 12, 2011, 02:39:11 am
Right ho. Good Luck with that. Whitehall? More like Black Hole. We'll not see that for seventy years, I expect.

Very rude of me; I forgot to thank you for all the stuff and crew that Challenger has provided.

Much appreciated.
 ;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: pliget on February 12, 2011, 06:50:02 pm
HMS Constance in Bermuda had a hurricane pass directly overhead on 21 Sep 1922

I would have copied the entries but I was halfway through before I realised.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-74051/ADM%2053-74051-012_1.jpg
(also see entry pm re man overboard from Capetown)

HMS Constance, Bermuda. 25 Sep 1922

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-74051/ADM%2053-74051-014_1.jpg

1000 Court of Inquiry held aboard to inquire into drowning of Sto of Capetown


HMS Constance, Bermuda. 27 Sep 1922

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-74051/ADM%2053-74051-015_1.jpg

1300 Lost overboard by accident during hurricane 3 Sails wind, 1 Boatswain Piper, 5 Broons Bass, 9 Scrubbing Brushes, 2 Brooms hair, 3 Buckets wood, 113 fathoms Cordage Taned(?) 1? ", 4 Squeeqes


I see also Dictionary.com has: squee-gee - Origin: 1835?45;  originally a nautical term; of obscure origin
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: bpb42 on February 13, 2011, 11:33:06 am
Hi,
    this is the Wikipedia entry for Hurricane No 2 of the 1922 Atlantic season,'
'By far the most powerful storm of the season, this hurricane formed well east of the Windward Islands and moved northwestward steadily strengthening. It grazed the Leeward Islands as a Category 2 hurricane  and began to recurve shortly thereafter. During this recurvature, it strengthened into a Category 3 storm, eventually attaining winds of 120 mph (190 km/h). It would maintain Category 3 intensity for the next four days until it became extratropical on September 23. The storm passed almost directly over Bermuda early on September 21, buffeting the island with 115 mph (185 km/h) winds and an eight-foot storm surge. As the center of this hurricane passed Bermuda  to the southeast, a lull occurred on the island for an hour around 9 am on September 21. The lowest pressure measured was 968 mbar (28.57 inHg). Significant damage occurred there, as winds peaked at 120 mph (190 km/h). It was Bermuda's highest tide since the hurricane of 1899.[1] The hurricane remains the strongest Atlantic tropical cyclone above 30.4?N, since Hurricane Dog of 1950 weakened to below 150 mph (240 km/h) as it reached that latitude.[2]

These Bermuda hurricanes seem a bit like London buses;- you wait ages for one, then a two of them turn up at once.

Great stuff.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on February 13, 2011, 12:24:13 pm
I do so wish that the 12N entry says what I first read it as

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-77067/ADM%2053-77067-0044_0.jpg

HBM Political Agent and Camel arrived on board

Sadly I suspect it is ... and Consul....

Far less interesting
K
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: pliget on February 13, 2011, 06:31:00 pm
Thank you bpb - most interesting.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: farrelly on February 14, 2011, 12:58:40 am
LOL, at 5:30 am:

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-34118/ADM53-34118-005_0.jpg

 ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on February 14, 2011, 01:08:06 am
Flashing and making water.

Unusual combination.

Erm ... I should imagine.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: farrelly on February 14, 2011, 01:12:58 am
 . . . and exactly WHAT kind of party did 20 Russians arrive for at 5:15 pm?

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-34118/ADM53-34118-005_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on February 14, 2011, 01:29:28 am
and exactly WHAT kind of party did 20 Russians arrive for at 5:15 pm?  

Well, I read it as "diving" but I suppose you have something less innocent in mind.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: farrelly on February 14, 2011, 03:11:35 am
Look at it more closely - whatever it is, it's not "diving", which this logkeeper has written clearly many times.  there's a tall letter right in the middle.  And why 20 Russians, arriving after dark?

Unless the logkeeper got a head start . . . 

 ;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on February 14, 2011, 03:39:19 am
fishing?
 ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on February 14, 2011, 03:22:20 pm
Looks like 'drinking party' to me. But they wouldn't actually put that in the log, would they?;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on February 14, 2011, 06:17:47 pm
War is cruel but sometimes humanity wins and negotiations are made and relief is given.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-37519/ADM%2053-37519-135_0.jpg

And a few days later THIS:

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-37519/ADM%2053-37519-139_1.jpg

I was really moved by the sending of medical stores by the Navy to the Germans.

A few days later contact is made, but what was said or made during those encounter are a mystery to me.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-37519/ADM%2053-37519-144_0.jpg

May be one of you knows a bit more and I will also inform you if any other encounters are made.

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: pliget on February 14, 2011, 07:06:03 pm
SS Naneric 26 June 1918

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-52208/ADM53-52208-062_1.jpg

1320 passed floating jar

Clearly seen as important to note by the naval record keeper so who am I to gainsay his judgment.

Mind you this is the same ship that is putting the clocks ahead and back on alternate days and also engaged in negative zig-zagging :).
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on February 14, 2011, 10:40:41 pm
It's also the ship that needed to pitch the top of the admiral's cabin in the middle of a rain storm. :o 
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on February 15, 2011, 02:59:22 pm
Can't have the Captain's cabin leaking, now can we ;D -

yours -

Kathy W.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on February 16, 2011, 04:26:52 pm
From the log of the HMS Caesar (which doesn't appear to have any intentions of leaving Bermuda, ever):
Quote from: 7 December, 1915
Sent 2nd picket boat on shore with Salvage party and witnesses to attend court of Inquiry into loss of 1st picket boat.
Good thing they didn't manage to lose both picket boats, then...;)
Also, they appear to be having a 'G and T training class', which sounds like extra classes after hours for sailors with an above-average IQ. Or training sessions for inexperienced drinkers who have yet to graduate to rum drills.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Lancsgreybeard on February 16, 2011, 04:34:35 pm
Is there something odd about a triangle in Bermuda!

In December 1917 Roxburgh also put a Picket Boat aground and are still trying to free it after three days

LGB
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on February 16, 2011, 05:01:35 pm
Is there something odd about a triangle in Bermuda!

In December 1917 Roxburgh also put a Picket Boat aground and are still trying to free it after three days

LGB
I'm sure it passes the time...
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on February 17, 2011, 01:46:29 pm
Sloop Torch is fun in many ways.  I had to share the landmarks used as anchorage markers at Gila (Gaila), New Caledonia, 4th May 1914.  Could this be the start of the idea behind Starbucks?  I mean, how often do your ships orient themselves by a coffee stove?  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on February 17, 2011, 04:24:28 pm
Quote from: 28 February, 1916
Admonished Capt SA Stoddart RMLI for having exceeded the limit of his wine bill for the current month
And that's in February! ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: farrelly on February 17, 2011, 11:01:42 pm
Sloop Torch is fun in many ways.  I had to share the landmarks used as anchorage markers at Gila (Gaila), New Caledonia, 4th May 1914.  Could this be the start of the idea behind Starbucks?  I mean, how often do your ships orient themselves by a coffee stove?  ;D

It's not a lot better, but maybe "coffee store"?  More visible from a distance?   :-\
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on February 17, 2011, 11:12:05 pm
I've alread corrected my spelling on the transcription, but the "coffee store" still tickles my funny bone. :)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: farrelly on February 19, 2011, 04:20:58 am
yep. sounds even more like Starbucks.   :P
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: pliget on February 20, 2011, 08:36:52 pm
HMS Naneric, 1st October 1918, Plymouth to Newport News

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-52208/ADM53-52208-111_0.jpg

1808 S/S Montfort torpedoed Lat 48 02N Long 10 04W
1839 Depth charges dropped by escorting Destroyers.


2nd October 1918

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-52208/ADM53-52208-111_1.jpg

1845 sighted periscope abaft port beam. opened fire with port howitzers. Convoy attacked. 2 torpedoes fired which passed underneath SS Benrimes & 15 feet astern of S/S Ogleric. Ogleric & Benrimes oppened fire.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on February 20, 2011, 08:40:29 pm
And on my birthday too!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: farrelly on February 21, 2011, 01:37:17 am
Um - is happy birthday in order?  I may not remember the next time October rolls around in 2011 time.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on February 21, 2011, 07:16:12 am
Then I'll say 'thanks' - I may not remember that you said that when October arrives  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: farrelly on February 21, 2011, 08:09:07 pm
I really don't want to know what this 6 pm entry means: Hands piped "Night Clothing."

I just want to picture them singing along with the pipers & fiddlers at bedtime:

Don your nighties and your slippers
Here's the order from our skipper:
Have some cocoa - ain't it great?
We'll be tucked in by the mate!

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-34133/ADM53-34133-003_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on February 21, 2011, 09:56:23 pm
The subject has come up before, with word-pictures of pyjamas and slippers abounding. ;D
This was the answer then, which dilutes the pictures to something less dramatic:

In the Royal Navy at that time and to this day for all I know, night clothing is not pyjamas, but just the old casual clothing that a seaman wears on his off duty evenings aboard. An old shirt, a patched pair of trousers, a sweater that has seen better days, that sort of thing.
Old Weatherers puzzled by the secret language of a seaman's day will enjoy this page: http://www.naval-history.net/WW2aaNavalLife-Customs2.htm
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: ElisabethB on February 21, 2011, 10:00:35 pm
I do remember but, oh dear, not nearly as much fun !  :D
I still like the idea of a slumber party !  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on February 22, 2011, 12:20:01 am
Have I mentioned that on the Patia, night clothing seems to get aired (though never actually washed, apparently) about twice a year? I seriously hope that's just because most log-keepers didn't feel it was important enough to note down, not because it really happened this rarely...:-\
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: LupusUK on February 22, 2011, 08:55:43 pm
Things getting a bit wet for HMS King Alfred (18th Feb 1918)

and on the 19th
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on February 22, 2011, 09:07:22 pm
Did you check the code charts (http://forum.oldweather.org/index.php?topic=1018.0) on exactly what that means?  Tropical Storm edging on hurricane and waves 36 feet and more would meet anyones idea of "wet"! :o
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: bpb42 on February 22, 2011, 10:33:13 pm
Hi Lupus,
             can we see the complete two pages please ?
Can you copy the http\\ links here. Thanks.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: LupusUK on February 22, 2011, 10:46:25 pm
Did you check the code charts (http://forum.oldweather.org/index.php?topic=1018.0) on exactly what that means?  Tropical Storm edging on hurricane and waves 36 feet and more would meet anyones idea of "wet"! :o
Yes, deliberate understatement on my part :)
Here are the two pages:-

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-45733/ADM53-45733-120_0.jpg

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-45733/ADM53-45733-120_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on February 22, 2011, 10:53:08 pm
Sorry, LupusUK, the thumbnails don't work well.

We have instructions in the newbies board and other places re making working links - it's a bit fussy because the thumbnails are unreadable and the URL you edit in is secured against any of the rest of us meddling with your work.

To make JPEG link, go to Posting Links and Images (A Guide) (http://forum.oldweather.org/index.php?topic=536.0)
"Right click the image of the page and choose:
  Copy Image Location if you are using Firefox
  Properties and copy the URL next to Address if you are using Internet Explorer
  Copy image URL if you are using Chrome
  (Ctrl+click) Copy Image Address if you are using Safari

Paste what you have copied into your post.
Pasting only the URL will provide a link to the image (preferable);"

And welcome to the forum.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Chris Gray on February 23, 2011, 02:18:55 am
I'm starting to feel like I belong; I've finally found my first "overboard by an idiot." :)

Although the spelling isn't so hot, he's more of an "ax idiot". Still writing the barometer readings Bass Ackwords too.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on February 23, 2011, 10:25:05 am
Somebody seems to have had a clumsy day:
Quote from: 17 September, 1916
Following articles lost overboard owing to capsizing of Whaler. 4 Rifles 4 Belts. paints. 120 Rds Ammunition, 6 oars, 1 set of sails Boat's original book
It wasn't even particularly windy at the time, so no idea what happened there...
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: dorbel on February 23, 2011, 11:33:04 am
Sometimes you so want to know what really happened.
"Read warrants Nos 46 and 47. Discharged to depot 1 Master At Arms and 1 marine corporal".
Pehaps on the other hand it's better not to know............
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Geoff on February 23, 2011, 12:59:15 pm
from HMS Southampton, a "map" of the ship:

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-60721/ADM%2053-60721-006_0.jpg (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-60721/ADM%2053-60721-006_0.jpg)
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-60721/ADM%2053-60721-006_1.jpg (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-60721/ADM%2053-60721-006_1.jpg)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on February 23, 2011, 04:19:52 pm
Geoff, I took the liberty to copy your post into the "If you find letters or other misc in the logbooks..." thread.  It is very interesting. :)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on February 23, 2011, 04:52:20 pm
Someone needed stronger pegs ...
'Frocks woolen divers p.att 26 1 in no lost overboard from clothes line'!  And did divers really wear woollen frocks or have I misread the first word?  I tried to make it 'socks' which sounded a bit more likely, but I don't think it is.  :)

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-57923/ADM%2053-57923-006_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on February 23, 2011, 05:21:23 pm
Hi HelenJ

That first word is odd. There are no cross strokes that one would expect for an F.

It looks most like an L to me but that makes no sense. Could also be an S but there is definitely a second letter before the ocks.

We definitely need the collective brains of OW on this one.

K
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on February 23, 2011, 05:24:18 pm
It looks like some kind of contraction to me because of the dot before the s ('Frock.s'). So could it be short for 'frock-coats'?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on February 23, 2011, 05:39:10 pm
I wonder if it is some kind of undergarment, worn beneath their diving gear -

yours -

Kathy W.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on February 23, 2011, 06:04:16 pm
Yes I'd wondered about that; I'm sure they would have needed something to stay warm.  But neither frocks nor socks nor frock coats sounds quite likely for that ....

Helen J
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: farrelly on February 23, 2011, 06:49:52 pm
I've seen "F"s like that, and I would take "divers" in this instance to mean "diverse", not having to do with diving.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on February 23, 2011, 07:39:55 pm
But 'diverse frocks' still sound odd things to be hanging on the washing line on a naval ship  :D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on February 23, 2011, 07:57:05 pm
Hi Helenj

Your letter is an "S". I have seen it written like this a lot of times.

Here is an example: The "S" of Saturday.

I wanted also to sent this page as there is some action going on while bombarding Moa Bay.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-37519/ADM%2053-37519-182_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on February 23, 2011, 08:19:35 pm
So it was probably diverse socks (or possibly diver's socks!) which took off into the Bay of Biscay.  And just as they were arriving back in chilly Britain after years basking in African heat.  Very bad luck ...
And that's a serious page of action you posted - I've never seen one with anything like that amount recorded.  Probably the nearest I came was when Rinaldo grounded and had a lot of trouble getting off again (in very bad weather, too).

Helen J
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on February 23, 2011, 09:39:17 pm
Hi Helenj

Your letter is an "S". I have seen it written like this a lot of times.

Here is an example: The "S" of Saturday.

I wanted also to sent this page as there is some action going on while bombarding Moa Bay.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-37519/ADM%2053-37519-182_1.jpg
Hmm, those two letters don't really look that similar to me, though. ??? The letter in helenj's log page has a crossbar, which the one on your log page is lacking. Also, your letter has a top loop, and that's missing from helenj's letter, which is using much straighter lines on the whole, Besides there's clearly meant to be another letter to go before the o - an e or an r (although the latter is far more plausible). So unless he meant to write 'Srocks' or Seocks', I'd say 'Frocks' is still the most likely reading...
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Geoff on February 24, 2011, 04:02:23 pm
My ship, HMS Southampton, appears to have run aground in the San Pedro Channel along with some other ships - the handwriting is quite hard to read!

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-60721/ADM%2053-60721-097_1.jpg (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-60721/ADM%2053-60721-097_1.jpg)

They keep trying the engines to get free but no luck so far!

The next day we're still stuck but the HMS Petersfield arrived with a lighter and the Admiral transferred the flag to Petersfield which then set off up the river!?

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-60721/ADM%2053-60721-098_0.jpg (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-60721/ADM%2053-60721-098_0.jpg)

Why pass the flag on I wonder?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on February 24, 2011, 09:23:53 pm
That I know from reading David Weber's Honorverse space opera.  The "flag" is the admiral's pennant and marks which ship in the squadron he is using as his home office - though when you're dealing with space ships, the flag is entirely virtual. ;)

That he moved to another ship with his flag means he isn't just making use of a mobile ride, he's making the Petersfield his new flagship.  That has to be humiliating for the Southampton's skipper.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on February 24, 2011, 10:14:17 pm

Exactly. Any running aground is bad news but running aground with the admiral aboard is some or all of court martial, disciplinary action and huge loss of status.

K
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on February 24, 2011, 10:29:40 pm

Exactly. Any running aground is bad news but running aground with the admiral aboard is some or all of court martial, disciplinary action and huge loss of status.

K

Plus lots of red faces, and much passing of the buck, I would assume!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Geoff on February 25, 2011, 08:52:02 am

Exactly. Any running aground is bad news but running aground with the admiral aboard is some or all of court martial, disciplinary action and huge loss of status.

K

Plus lots of red faces, and much passing of the buck, I would assume!

I didn't get to see the end of this debacle as I'm almost at the end of my journey and I keep getting bounced ahead by a week or two to the next entry that needs doing so missed the actual "refloating" of the Southampton.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on February 25, 2011, 04:48:00 pm


From the log of the Espiegle Nov 1922. Our Divers get a bath.
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-77067/ADM%2053-77067-0085_1.jpg

See the 10.00 entry. "Divers to Monthly Dip."

Is that what it says or have I just made a really stupid misread?

I have transcribed over 750 pages of this ship and not seen another "Monthly Dip" recorded, but this is a very quiet day.

K
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on February 25, 2011, 06:38:09 pm
That's exactly what I read, but I'm willing to bet it's a practice dive to check the equipment and techniques.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on February 25, 2011, 07:04:00 pm

Thanks Janet for the confirmation that I am not totally misreading it.

I am sure you are right that it is something more than just a bath and training would be the obvious one.

Could it be that the log keeper is making a joke? Surely not.

K
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on February 25, 2011, 07:14:24 pm
Interesting note from the Trent - a general servant sentenced to 1 month's leave stopped for breaking his leave.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-63492/ADM%2053-63492-014_0.jpg (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-63492/ADM%2053-63492-014_0.jpg)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on February 25, 2011, 07:16:24 pm
Some of our log-keeping lieutenants must have a sense of humor, even if they are confining themselves to allowable events. :)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on February 26, 2011, 12:11:37 am
My first submarine: http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-54563/ADM%2053-54563-013_1.jpg
Nothing exciting happened, though: we just spotted it, altered course and eventually watched it dive. Oh well.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on February 26, 2011, 07:17:42 am
Cooks have to clean the mess decks, apparently.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-76851/ADM%2053-76851-0116_1.jpg (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-76851/ADM%2053-76851-0116_1.jpg)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on February 26, 2011, 08:46:02 am
Maybe the previous day's dinner was no good and they were being punished?;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on February 26, 2011, 09:00:48 am
I reckon the Endeavour must be the cleanest ship in the fleet - two months sitting in Sheerness now with hands doing very little other then cleaning, scraping and painting. It must be gleaming!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Lancsgreybeard on February 26, 2011, 09:34:19 am
Changsha, 15 November, 1917

reported by "Woodlark"

Military Governor fled in a Chinese Gunboat

LGB
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on February 26, 2011, 01:48:55 pm
Boxing Day concert on the Endeavour:

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-76851/ADM%2053-76851-0188_1.jpg

And an officers' dance:

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-76851/ADM%2053-76851-0189_1.jpg

And a whist drive:

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-76851/ADM%2053-76851-0190_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: ElisabethB on February 26, 2011, 02:23:28 pm
Look's like a fun loving crew !  :D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: ElisabethB on February 26, 2011, 06:56:40 pm
You can only imagine what they were singing !  ;) ;D
(http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5292/5479711126_2d01a69a01.jpg)
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-54788/ADM%2053-54788-014_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on February 26, 2011, 08:53:49 pm
The cooks have to clean the mess decks everyday on the Foxglove  ;D

yours -

Kathy
(sometimes that is about the only entry in the log for the day  :D)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: LupusUK on February 27, 2011, 12:32:07 pm
HMS King Alfred in another storm:-

   0.30 Shipped heavy sea - carried away starb. bridge padder & Blast screen

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-45733/ADM53-45733-135_1.jpg
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-45733/ADM53-45733-136_0.jpg

I've got an idea what a blast screen is but a bridge padder?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: studentforever on February 27, 2011, 02:17:07 pm
Bridge ladder, he's just put a slightly larger loop on the l.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: LupusUK on February 27, 2011, 02:23:36 pm
Bridge ladder, he's just put a slightly larger loop on the l.

 That makes more sense thank you :-[
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on February 27, 2011, 07:08:51 pm

Does that count as a mondegreen???
K
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on February 27, 2011, 08:03:24 pm
Here a strange event:

A warrant from H.M.S. Thistle is read onboard H.M.S. Challenger. Unfortunately we will have to wait another 5 or 6 years to to find out what exactly happened.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-37519/ADM%2053-37519-196_0.jpg

Maybe someone from the Navy could also explain how it comes that a warrant of a ship is read on another one.

Thanks HK.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on March 01, 2011, 08:28:24 pm
HMS Constance in Bermuda had a hurricane pass directly overhead on 21 Sep 1922

I would have copied the entries but I was halfway through before I realised.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-74051/ADM%2053-74051-012_1.jpg
(also see entry pm re man overboard from Capetown)

HMS Constance, Bermuda. 25 Sep 1922

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-74051/ADM%2053-74051-014_1.jpg

1000 Court of Inquiry held aboard to inquire into drowning of Sto of Capetown


HMS Constance, Bermuda. 27 Sep 1922

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-74051/ADM%2053-74051-015_1.jpg

1300 Lost overboard by accident during hurricane 3 Sails wind, 1 Boatswain Piper, 5 Broons Bass, 9 Scrubbing Brushes, 2 Brooms hair, 3 Buckets wood, 113 fathoms Cordage Taned(?) 1? ", 4 Squeeqes


I see also Dictionary.com has: squee-gee - Origin: 1835?45;  originally a nautical term; of obscure origin

Capetown was also there and records it all hour by hour.  It records HMS Constance drifting 100 feet from the basin wall during the hurricane, and then just after it eased HMS Dartmouth had a fire in one of its boilers and Capetown sent a fire party to assist them.
And finally and tragically later that day a stoker drowned, falling into the basin from the jetty outside the dock - John J Lineham, Stoker 1, O.N. K 20284.  I'll post him in the records of death as well.
Fascinating to read Constance's records as well.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-72547/ADM%2053-72547-087_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 01, 2011, 11:07:01 pm
Quote
Dropped and lost target.
Oops. :P
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Lancsgreybeard on March 02, 2011, 03:46:31 pm
Chilly in Vladivostok

19 February, 1920.  "Cairo" records air temperature of Zero (0)F

LGB
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 02, 2011, 09:37:53 pm
'Hands to medical lecture' - must have been a lecture on anatomy.;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on March 03, 2011, 08:17:15 pm
Three very busy days for H.M.S. Challenger trying to salvage S.S. Conrie Castle.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-37519/ADM%2053-37519-222_0.jpg

H.M.S. Pioneer tried but gave up.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-37519/ADM%2053-37519-222_1.jpg

H.M.S.Challenger also tried and too had to abandon.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-37519/ADM%2053-37519-223_0.jpg

Finally we DID IT. What a relief it must have been for the crew of S.S. Conrie Castle.

Some terms might need some explanations:

A hawser is a thick cable (in our case 6") used for towing and passed through the hawser or cat's hole.

A good description of a sheet anchor is given here: http://www.1902encyclopedia.com/A/ANC/anchor-06.html
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on March 04, 2011, 10:44:59 pm
On Aug. 23, 1921, a group of sailors from the Foxglove, then in Hong Kong, went to the cinema - I myself am going tomorrow to see The King's Speech  ;D.  As weird as it sounds, this makes these men even more real to me.

yours -

Kathy W.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: dorbel on March 05, 2011, 02:17:15 pm
Phew, 13th March 1916 and HMS Donegal is in Scapa Flow. 69 on the sick list, the Captain and 3 other officers sent to hospital and at quarters 10 punishment warants read out! What can it all mean?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 05, 2011, 04:10:27 pm
Phew, 13th March 1916 and HMS Donegal is in Scapa Flow. 69 on the sick list, the Captain and 3 other officers sent to hospital and at quarters 10 punishment warants read out! What can it all mean?
A really bad case of food poisoning maybe?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on March 05, 2011, 05:15:56 pm
Phew, 13th March 1916 and HMS Donegal is in Scapa Flow. 69 on the sick list, the Captain and 3 other officers sent to hospital and at quarters 10 punishment warants read out! What can it all mean?
A really bad case of food poisoning maybe?

Perhaps the warrants were being read to the cooks?!!  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 05, 2011, 08:59:13 pm
Perhaps the warrants were being read to the cooks?!!  ;D
Why not?;) I mean, if, say, something had gone off because they had failed to store it properly and that in turn made everybody sick, they'd be held accountable, no?

Not exactly riveting, but I found the entry 'Hands employed. Gunners party.' rather amusing.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 05, 2011, 09:33:58 pm
Quote
1 Railway waggon loaded with coal dropped from crane on boat deck smashing Paymasters office.
Luckily no-one got hurt, it seems.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on March 05, 2011, 09:54:03 pm
Of all the offices to smash, they picked the one belonging to the man with authority to bill them for the repairs? ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: ElisabethB on March 05, 2011, 10:04:30 pm
Oh dear !  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 05, 2011, 11:11:50 pm
Of all the offices to smash, they picked the one belonging to the man with authority to bill them for the repairs? ;D
Yes, you'd think that if they had to do something as dumb as that they'd at least make sure he was in his office at the time, to avoid the whole billing business...;)

In other news, I've come across a page which has a lot of corrections in the weather data, which may or may not be of interest to the researchers. Is there anywhere in particular I should post this?
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-54567/ADM%2053-54567-017_0.jpg
I'm only transcribing the bits which haven't been crossed out, but since it's several entries, I thought it might be of interest.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on March 05, 2011, 11:43:02 pm
And that many errors on a page so neat and consistant, it has to be a copy by a writer.  Something was very wrong there.

For lack of a better place, I'd put it in If you find letters or other misc in the logbooks... (http://forum.oldweather.org/index.php?topic=718.msg12238#msg12238)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on March 06, 2011, 12:47:46 am
So much weather it almost won't fit in the box - bcgupq  :o

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-69760/ADM%2053-69760-009_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 06, 2011, 07:39:16 am
So much weather it almost won't fit in the box - bcgupq  :o

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-69760/ADM%2053-69760-009_0.jpg
Wow, that's a lot of weather. ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Geoff on March 06, 2011, 01:03:12 pm
from HMS Southampton, 13 December 1920, off the coast of Peru near Mollendo.

at 02:00 in the morning: "Saw glare in sky NEbyN"

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-60721/ADM%2053-60721-177_1.jpg (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-60721/ADM%2053-60721-177_1.jpg)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on March 06, 2011, 07:04:07 pm
The Foxglove certainly had a crew with diverse interests:  ;D
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-77621/ADM%2053-77621-0032_0.jpg
(See the entries in the afternoon)


I have also seen references to cricket teams, football (soccer) teams and other forms of entertainment -

yours -

Kathy W.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on March 06, 2011, 08:18:51 pm
The ship was commissioned on 31 December 1914. Only two weeks later, Mr Davis has already had enough.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-50069/ADM%2053-50069-012_1.jpg

They've not even done anything yet! Just sat in the dock and given everybody loads of leave!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on March 06, 2011, 08:30:25 pm
The Foxglove certainly had a crew with diverse interests:  ;D
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-77621/ADM%2053-77621-0032_0.jpg
(See the entries in the afternoon)


I have also seen references to cricket teams, football (soccer) teams and other forms of entertainment -

yours -

Kathy W.

Capetown is pretty sporting too - in the last few weeks they've landed large groups of 50 to play football and cricket, and 100 to take part in the US Navy Sports.  All this while poddling up the west coast of Mexico and California - not a bad life!

Helen J
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on March 07, 2011, 06:03:06 pm
From the log of HMS Odin April 1914.

"Tested Lightning Conductor..."

How did they do that without waiting for a thunderstorm????

K
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 07, 2011, 10:51:50 pm
I've just discovered that there's not only a Lieutenant McCartney on board the Patia, we also seem to have a steward called McLennon (who got himself a mention in the log by falling overboard and getting a bit squashed between the ship and the dock wall). I wonder whether there's an AB McHarrison lurking about as well? ;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on March 07, 2011, 10:56:17 pm
Well, the Firefox certainly does know how to cater to every taste in entertainment -

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-77622/ADM%2053-77622-0007_1.jpg

Please see the 5:35 am entry

I wonder if this was a club or if it was a foraging expedition  ;D

yours -

Kathy W.

And they went out again the next day! - K.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 07, 2011, 11:07:48 pm
Someone is being unnecessarily harsh towards a tug :-\:
Quote
Two tugs assisting "Victor" & "Chieftian". "Chieftian", being of no use to ship was cast off.
And yes, he really doesn't know how to spell 'chieftain'. I double-checked.;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on March 07, 2011, 11:14:03 pm
I've just discovered that there's not only a Lieutenant McCartney on board the Patia, we also seem to have a steward called McLennon (who got himself a mention in the log by falling overboard and getting a bit squashed between the ship and the dock wall). I wonder whether there's an AB McHarrison lurking about as well? ;)

And dont forget stoker Star.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 07, 2011, 11:19:13 pm
And dont forget stoker Star.
Hmm, I think that ought to be McStarr, really - seeing as they're clearly the All-Scottish McBeatles. :P
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: DJ_59 on March 08, 2011, 04:41:36 am

Don't forget Pete McBest like THEY did.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 08, 2011, 07:55:11 am

Don't forget Pete McBest like THEY did.
Wasn't he lost overboard by an idiot?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Geoff on March 08, 2011, 07:14:06 pm
An unusual death for a sailor: "Died ashore in Hilo Hospital as a result of a motor car accident - George Frank Osborn Yeo Sigs O.N. 224043."

This is from HMS Capetown, docked in Hilo, Hawaii.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-72547/ADM%2053-72547-131_0.jpg (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-72547/ADM%2053-72547-131_0.jpg)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on March 08, 2011, 07:31:59 pm
George Osborn R.I.P.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 08, 2011, 09:47:35 pm
That sounds extremely unlucky. Just how many cars can there have been in Hawaii in 1922? :-\
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: DJ_59 on March 08, 2011, 10:47:35 pm

Don't forget Pete McBest like THEY did.
Wasn't he lost overboard by an idiot?

I heard McHarrison, McMcCartny and McLennon chucked him over and blamed it on an inner ear problem. 

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 08, 2011, 10:54:50 pm
I heard McHarrison, McMcCartny and McLennon chucked him over and blamed it on an inner ear problem.
That sounds *exactly* like the kind of thing they'd do, unfortunately. So really, he was lost overboard by three idiots, then.:(

In other news, I just found out that we have a parachute on board. Or I should say had, because it's been lost:
Quote from: 9 April, 1917
Lost overbooard in rough weather. Hoses with couplings 7. Life buoys circular 3. Flexible VPS No 2 & 4 guns 1. Oars (ash) 4. Branch pipes 3. Boats gripes 3. Parachutes 1.
What do you need parachutes for on a ship? ??? I'd have understood it if this had happened on the Manica, but there are no planes around as far as I can tell.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: DJ_59 on March 08, 2011, 11:02:01 pm
That sounds *exactly* like the kind of thing they'd do, unfortunately. So really, he was lost overboard by three idiots, then.:(

Though in fairness to those three, I've heard the Decca audition tapes, and McBest was one of the McWorst drummers in Liverpool.  Couldn't even keep the beat.  I woulda chucked him overboard, too.

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: DJ_59 on March 08, 2011, 11:04:34 pm

Geoff: I tried to find some info on Mr. Osborn via ancestry.com, but to no avail.  It is definitely an unexpected cause of death.

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 08, 2011, 11:20:16 pm
David Cameron is on board as well, it seems. And he's just been cautioned for being a bit useless:
Quote from: 13 April, 1917
Cautioned Engineer Sub Lieut Cameron for neglecting his duty in not immediately reporting a fireman, who refused to obey his orders, to the officer of the watch, in accordance with the Commander's standing orders. D Cameron
Edit: It's a good day for cautioning, it seems:
Quote from: 13 April, 1917
Cautioned JB Middlemass RNR for creating a disturbance on the bridge during the 1st watch on April 12th & disobeying the ['(bridge)', crossed out] orders of the officer of the watch Lieut H. Watson RNR. Signed J B Middlemass Mid RNR.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on March 09, 2011, 03:06:36 pm
Gunnery Competition.

This page includes the log of a gunnery competition, off Muscat in May 1914 between HMS Odin and HMS Alert.
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-53180/ADM%2053-53180-044_1.jpg

It was clearly properly organised with "umpires" who switched between ships at "half time".

Odins results were 4" guns: 16 rounds fired, 2 hits and 3 pdr guns: 13 rounds fired, 4 hits. Sadly they were clearly going to add Alert's results underneath, but changed their minds and crossed out her name so we will never know who won.

K
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Geoff on March 10, 2011, 07:43:29 am

Geoff: I tried to find some info on Mr. Osborn via ancestry.com, but to no avail.  It is definitely an unexpected cause of death.

Thanks for looking Deej, I tried googling the name but no luck.

It is rather an unusual death for the time as there couldn't have been many cars around.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: farrelly on March 10, 2011, 07:34:31 pm
That sounds *exactly* like the kind of thing they'd do, unfortunately. So really, he was lost overboard by three idiots, then.:(

Though in fairness to those three, I've heard the Decca audition tapes, and McBest was one of the McWorst drummers in Liverpool.  Couldn't even keep the beat.  I woulda chucked him overboard, too.

Yep. He was rhythmically challenged, all right.  But it's always difficult when a band member is cut loose.  I've always felt kind of bad for Pete Best, but the Beatles might never have come to our attention if he hadn't been replaced.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: DJ_59 on March 11, 2011, 12:52:10 am

Geoff: 1922 was the first year Hawaii issued standardized license plates.  They had enough cars to make that worthwhile.  By 1922 they had a major highway going to Honolulu, as well.  I can't find stats on how many cars there were, but I know what they looked like in 1922, and they weren't all that safe.  Seatbelts had already been invented, but they weren't really in use until the 50s.


Farrelly: Don't feel too bad for Pete.  Yeah, it had to be depressing thinking you had come that close to unprecedented fame and fortune, but he wasn't going to be the guy, not with timing issues like he had.  Besides, McCartney and Martin made sure those Decca demos were on Anthology Volume 1 so Pete would get royalties, which came to nearly 4 million pounds after taxes.  Not bad back wages for a guy who couldn't keep the beat and often missed gigs without warning (forcing Paul to play drums in the clubs). 

AND... I don't know if it was Pete's idea or the label's (I'm going to assume it's the label), but he put out a terrible record called The Best of the Beatles, which tricked a lot of people into buying a very, very bad record.  Even if it was a suit's idea, Pete loses sympathy points for that one.

And now I will reprimand myself for topic drift.  I will be in the Time Out chair if anyone needs me.

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Geoff on March 11, 2011, 01:45:22 pm
I'm currently on HMS Dwarf which is patrolling around west  Africa in September 1914.

This undated log entry has some action: "Landing party returned with 4 prisoners having destroyed enemy's signal station & examined? [illegible] point."

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-40444/ADM53-40444-041_0.jpg (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-40444/ADM53-40444-041_0.jpg)

There are other interesting entries on this page but the handwriting is awful and I can't make any sense of what's happening  :(
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: studentforever on March 11, 2011, 01:58:07 pm
Not a big problem. Dwarf is engaging with Cumberland. They opened fire on the Sanatorium (naughty!). They also engaged the guard ship Hertz? Elizabeth which retreated after receiving one hit. Later on they anchored by Cumberland.
Hope this helps.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 11, 2011, 02:01:17 pm
I'm currently on HMS Dwarf which is patrolling around west  Africa in September 1914.

This undated log entry has some action: "Landing party returned with 4 prisoners having destroyed enemy's signal station & examined? [illegible] point."

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-40444/ADM53-40444-041_0.jpg (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-40444/ADM53-40444-041_0.jpg)

There are other interesting entries on this page but the handwriting is awful and I can't make any sense of what's happening  :(
That looks like 'Suellaba point' to me - and apparently there's a coastal town called 'Souellaba' in Cameroon. Could that be it?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 11, 2011, 02:02:11 pm
Not a big problem. Dwarf is engaging with Cumberland. They opened fire on the Sanatorium (naughty!). They also engaged the guard ship Hertz? Elizabeth which retreated after receiving one hit. Later on they anchored by Cumberland.
Hope this helps.
Hertzogin (which should probably be 'Herzogin', i.e. duchess).
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on March 11, 2011, 03:23:10 pm
An odd sort of day on the Foxglove:

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-77622/ADM%2053-77622-0026_1.jpg

yours -

Kathy W.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 11, 2011, 04:09:25 pm
Sorry for being a bit stupid, but what's so odd about it? The funeral party? ???
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on March 11, 2011, 04:37:07 pm
For me, it was more the Sanatorium parties coming and going with no explanation as to why these parties had gone and were going - there are no sailors on the sick list: was there a sudden epidemic of TB?  Did a group start to hear voices?   :o  Was it a vacation?  I don't know, for some reason it just struck me as a Twin Peaks sort of day (an odd US TV show in the 90s).  And then, a funeral party - for a crew member?  ex-crew member?  crew members' friend from another ship?  A party sent solely to honor a dead comrade?  (which is not a bad reason at all for such a group)

I wish there was more information!!!

Non sequiturianly (which is how I would describe this day) yours -

Kathy W.

There was another ship (whose name escapes me now) that also sent crew members to the sanatorium with no explanation as to why.  I dearly wish there was a way to go back and smack these log keepers on the head and tell them to include the details!  ;D - K.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on March 11, 2011, 05:32:15 pm
Hi Kathy,

The other sanatorium party was mine - from Rinaldo.  The entire crew took off to the Sanatorium in Simonstown in May 1916 for about a week.  No explanation at all; and there was one sailor on the sick list when they went, and two when they came back!
I absolutely sympathise with your frustration at the complete lack of forethought on the part of the log keepers; they should have known that some day we would be transcribing their logs and wanting to know the whole story, not just the scraps they give us.  However I'm interested that another crew took off to the sanatorium in a different place and time - so perhaps it was quite a regular part of life? 

Helen J
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on March 11, 2011, 05:38:53 pm
Hi Helen -

It may be a yearly routine sort of thing - the Foxglove just sent off Sanatorium Party #3 - I have transcribed bits and pieces of the Foxglove's log for 1922 and 1923, and there was nothing like this in the pages I have done.  ;D

Maybe this was a mini-vacation for the crew  :D

yours -

Kathy W.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on March 11, 2011, 06:05:03 pm
Tornado!  :o

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-76852/ADM%2053-76852-0057_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on March 11, 2011, 07:05:16 pm
Hi Helen -

It may be a yearly routine sort of thing - the Foxglove just sent off Sanatorium Party #3 - I have transcribed bits and pieces of the Foxglove's log for 1922 and 1923, and there was nothing like this in the pages I have done.  ;D

Maybe this was a mini-vacation for the crew  :D

yours -

Kathy W.


Nice to think it might have been - but I think I did pretty much all of Rinaldo from 1916 to 1919 and never came across another mention of a sanatorium.
I wonder how many of them there were scattered round the world, and whether they were just naval ones, or could anyone go?  I feel a bit of research coming on .....   :)

Helen J
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on March 11, 2011, 07:36:25 pm
We were in a tornado warning (in Northern Virginia and Central Maryland) last night - luckily, it seems the twister didn't set down -

yours -

Kathy W.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 11, 2011, 07:58:05 pm
Slightly unusual 'lost overboard by an idiot':
Quote from: 2 June, 1917
Lost by armed Guards of s/s "Elve" & "Bernisce" through torpedoing of vessels by enemy submarines. Pistols Wesley .6. Belts Waist .7. Pouches Cart. Pistol .7. Holsters .7.
Which begs the question: why did they only lose 6 pistols? ???
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Geoff on March 11, 2011, 10:47:02 pm
Not a big problem. Dwarf is engaging with Cumberland. They opened fire on the Sanatorium (naughty!). They also engaged the guard ship Hertz? Elizabeth which retreated after receiving one hit. Later on they anchored by Cumberland.
Hope this helps.

Thanks for the help, this clears things up for me.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Geoff on March 12, 2011, 08:15:13 am
Some further action from HMS Dwarf, currently in the area of the Cameroon River in west Africa, September 1914:

"Sighted lighter & steam boat ahead & opened fire."
"Shore battery from Tess? Point opened fire. Engaged shore battery & ordered sweeping? boats to take cover on West? side."
"Retired. Having been hit once under the bridge."
"Let go port anchor in 3 1/2 fathoms south of sunken ships."
"Discharged P.O. [illegible] who had been seriously wounded in the action to Cumberland."
"Darkened ship."

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-40444/ADM53-40444-042_0.jpg (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-40444/ADM53-40444-042_0.jpg)

Edit: The wounded man died and was buried by a landing party the following day - his name was P.O. Growber? (can't make out the writing)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 12, 2011, 08:46:23 am
Edit: The wounded man died and was buried by a landing party the following day - his name was P.O. Growber? (can't make out the writing)
That must be F. H. Coomber: http://www.naval-history.net/xDKCas1914-09Sept.htm
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Geoff on March 12, 2011, 08:50:56 am
Thanks for the link mutabilitie, that must be the person. The handwriting in the log is quite awful at times and I was sure that the name started with a "G" not a "C"!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 12, 2011, 01:12:47 pm
Thanks for the link mutabilitie, that must be the person. The handwriting in the log is quite awful at times and I was sure that the name started with a "G" not a "C"!
The writing doesn't look so very bad to me in terms of the actual letter shapes, he's just a bit of a sloppy writer, unfortunately.:( And he has a very odd way of linking up capital C's and lowercase o's. At first I thought that he might have added in the first o later, but it's in the 1.15 entry as well ('Cover').
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Geoff on March 12, 2011, 08:24:44 pm
Some more action from the Dwarf, 15 September 1914, near the Cameroon River:

"4:50 [am] Sighted launch. Opened fire.
Sent Vigilant to investigate.
6:00 Vigilant returned with launch
filled with infernal machine [that's what it looks like to me  :D ]
6:30 Captured 1 german from "Louie"?

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-40444/ADM53-40444-044_0.jpg (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-40444/ADM53-40444-044_0.jpg)

The next day the Dwarf skirmished with a german gunboat and was rammed [as far as I can make out].

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-40444/ADM53-40444-044_1.jpg (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-40444/ADM53-40444-044_1.jpg)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 12, 2011, 09:19:54 pm
filled with infernal machine [that's what it looks like to me  :D ]
Another one for the mondegreen thread, methinks.;)
Quote
The next day the Dwarf skirmished with a german gunboat and was rammed [as far as I can make out].

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-40444/ADM53-40444-044_1.jpg (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-40444/ADM53-40444-044_1.jpg)
"Opened fire on ship coming into river. German Gunboat Nachtigal rammed ship abreast Foremast Port side. Slipped cable & beached ship on left Bank of river placed Collision mat. Nachtigal on fire. Picked up 4 white [too small to read, but I think it begins with 'sea-'] & 8 Black. Secured ship to river bank. Lost 1 Bows anchor & 2 shackles of cable. 1 Swisal (?) piece, 1 anchor shackle, 2 joining shackles."

Who or what is TIKO, by the way?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 12, 2011, 11:07:03 pm
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-54571/ADM%2053-54571-012_1.jpg
1am: 'Officers to stripping' - what on earth is that supposed to mean? Early-morning burlesque? :-\
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Geoff on March 12, 2011, 11:19:47 pm

Who or what is TIKO, by the way?

I did a bit of googling and found this article which seems to fit the time frame (it mentions the "Tiko column"):

http://www.kaiserscross.com/188001/264701.html (http://www.kaiserscross.com/188001/264701.html)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 13, 2011, 12:06:43 am
Ah, so it's not an acronym, then?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on March 13, 2011, 09:21:59 am
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-54571/ADM%2053-54571-012_1.jpg
1am: 'Officers to stripping' - what on earth is that supposed to mean? Early-morning burlesque? :-\

I had something like "Marines to 3 pdr stripping" which had some of the ladies a bit excited but we came to the conclusion that it was just marines exercising stripping down a gun. I guess this is something similar, but why they did it at midnight is less clear.
HTH
K
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 13, 2011, 01:37:19 pm
I had something like "Marines to 3 pdr stripping" which had some of the ladies a bit excited but we came to the conclusion that it was just marines exercising stripping down a gun. I guess this is something similar, but why they did it at midnight is less clear.
HTH
K
Ah. I thought it might be some kind of drill routine because of the context in which it occurs. It's still a bit unusual, though, because I'm positive that I've not seen it in any of the earlier logs I've transcribed for this ship - which is nearly two and a half years' worth - so either it's something which didn't form part of their standard routine or it's something which was only introduced in mid-1917. Or they referred to it as something else before then (maybe it was just part of the gun drill?).
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 14, 2011, 10:02:39 am
Variation on a theme: destroyed by an idiot:
Quote from: 28 June, 1917
Destroyed by accident, Supply notes & Originals of demand notes for Engineer's stores for the period February 1915 to 6th February 1917.
How do you manage to destroy that many notes 'by accident', though? Did someone accidentally set fire to them? ???
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on March 14, 2011, 10:36:41 am
Maybe the sailors he has been making demands of stormed the ship and his office and dumped the file cabinet overboard? ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 14, 2011, 03:38:43 pm
Bizarre log entry of the day:
Quote from: 2 July, 1917
Private M. McGrain RMLI lost his cap by accident on Saturday 23rd June.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: DJ_59 on March 14, 2011, 03:58:47 pm

"Accident" my foot.  Everyone knows McGrain hated that cap.

Regarding accidental loss by fire, I'm sure it was just a matter of destroying a large stack of stuff, then finding out some of it wasn't supposed to be destroyed.

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 14, 2011, 04:36:58 pm

"Accident" my foot.  Everyone knows McGrain hated that cap.
;D
I also find it quite odd that instead of admitting to that "accident" right away, he evidently spent over a week pretending it hadn't happened, until he was caught out in some drill. Did he seriously expect to get away with that??
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on March 14, 2011, 08:34:04 pm
McGain's excuse could have been: Sir! Lots of wind. Sir!  ::)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Lancsgreybeard on March 16, 2011, 11:46:56 am
Auckland 28 September, 1914  10:30pm

"Philomel" landed watch to quell disturbance "Corinthia"

LGB
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on March 16, 2011, 12:54:38 pm
Star gazing:

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-76852/ADM%2053-76852-0069_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Lancsgreybeard on March 16, 2011, 04:57:30 pm
From log of Victorian 3 August, 1915

Officers at sword drill, lost overboard 1 bayonet and scabbard

LGB
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on March 16, 2011, 05:14:58 pm
From log of Victorian 3 August, 1915

Officers at sword drill, lost overboard 1 bayonet and scabbard

LGB

Obviously they need a bit more drilling if not only did he fumble his sword overboard, but his scabbard too!  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on March 16, 2011, 06:51:37 pm
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-53180/ADM%2053-53180-136_0.jpg

See the 12.45 am Entry. Steam cutter away after floating object.

Only to find that it was a dead mule!!!

K
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on March 16, 2011, 07:33:13 pm
I love that it is not a dead mule, but rather, a mule dead.  ;D

yours -

Kathy W.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on March 17, 2011, 09:07:30 am
Some busy days for H.M.S. Challenger.

Ras Sangamku must be a tricky place: H.M.S. Manica went aground and was towed from her position.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-37520/ADM53-37520-0032_0.jpg

Manica's Bower must have been quite stuck in the corals because tries to recuperate it failed.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-37520/ADM53-37520-0033_1.jpg

This day was very busy: In the morning a British dhow was stopped and examined, and, later, H.M.S. Thistle went aground close to where H.M.S. Manica went aground.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-37520/ADM53-37520-0037_1.jpg

Happily no damage was done to those ships.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 17, 2011, 09:58:44 am
Some busy days for H.M.S. Challenger.

Ras Sangamku must be a tricky place: H.M.S. Manica went aground and was towed from her position.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-37520/ADM53-37520-0032_0.jpg

Manica's Bower must have been quite stuck in the corals because tries to recuperate it failed.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-37520/ADM53-37520-0033_1.jpg

This day was very busy: In the morning a British dhow was stopped and examined, and, later, H.M.S. Thistle went aground close to where H.M.S. Manica went aground.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-37520/ADM53-37520-0037_1.jpg

Happily no damage was done to those ships.
Heh, I remember those entries.:)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on March 17, 2011, 03:51:57 pm
Hi Mutabilitie

It could be interesting to know how H.M.S. Manica and H.M.S. Thistle got aground.  :)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 17, 2011, 05:39:40 pm
Hi Mutabilitie

It could be interesting to know how H.M.S. Manica and H.M.S. Thistle got aground.  :)
I only remember the Manica running aground and being towed away (and I think we spotted the Thistle later and they said they didn't want any help - muppets). But I don't think there was any detailed mention of how it happened in the log. Hang on, I'll try to look it up...

Edit: Yes, as I remembered. There's a detailed account of what happened after they ran aground, but that's it:
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-48166/ADM%2053-48166-013_0.jpg
Edit2: And here's the Thistle turning down our offer of help:
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-48166/ADM%2053-48166-018_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on March 17, 2011, 07:53:18 pm
Hi Mutabilitie

It could be interesting to know how H.M.S. Manica and H.M.S. Thistle got aground.  :)
I only remember the Manica running aground and being towed away (and I think we spotted the Thistle later and they said they didn't want any help - muppets). But I don't think there was any detailed mention of how it happened in the log. Hang on, I'll try to look it up...

Edit: Yes, as I remembered. There's a detailed account of what happened after they ran aground, but that's it:
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-48166/ADM%2053-48166-013_0.jpg
Edit2: And here's the Thistle turning down our offer of help:
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-48166/ADM%2053-48166-018_1.jpg

Thank you very much for this post.

Your Lieutenant is very precise in his description of the incident. Amazing.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on March 17, 2011, 08:46:39 pm
I loved this, I've never seen it described this way before.  I copied it into the "If you find letters or other misc in the logbooks... " thread.  It is definitely unusual.

Hi Mutabilitie

It could be interesting to know how H.M.S. Manica and H.M.S. Thistle got aground.  :)
I only remember the Manica running aground and being towed away (and I think we spotted the Thistle later and they said they didn't want any help - muppets). But I don't think there was any detailed mention of how it happened in the log. Hang on, I'll try to look it up...

Edit: Yes, as I remembered. There's a detailed account of what happened after they ran aground, but that's it:
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-48166/ADM%2053-48166-013_0.jpg
Edit2: And here's the Thistle turning down our offer of help:
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-48166/ADM%2053-48166-018_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 18, 2011, 04:54:02 pm
I think it may have been because that particular log-writer was potentially quite bored (up to that point, there had been little to note down in the log except a long string of near-identical weather descriptions), so as soon as he got a chance to write about something more exciting, he really threw himself into it. ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on March 19, 2011, 02:41:50 pm
Tobacco smuggling on board the Endeavour!

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-76852/ADM%2053-76852-0156_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on March 19, 2011, 03:46:58 pm
 :o  Riveting indeed!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on March 19, 2011, 04:46:42 pm
This so odd - the crew of the Foxglove was paid off on Dec. 26, 1921 and then a new log book began on Dec. 27, 1921 and it contains the regular sort of entries - there is no mention of dry dock or retirement or any thing that might have lead to the crew being paid off and the ship retired - why would the Navy do this?  ???

Log page for Dec. 26, 1921:
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-77623/ADM%2053-77623-0031_0.jpg

Log page for Dec. 27, 1921:
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-77624/ADM%2053-77624-0003_1.jpg

I am so confused!!  :o

yours -

Kathy W.

REPRIEVE!
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-77624/ADM%2053-77624-0004_0.jpg

and a new crew:
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-77624/ADM%2053-77624-0004_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on March 19, 2011, 05:52:16 pm
The same happened with Danae in Malta - the voyage her crew had been assigned to carry out was over, and all officers and company were paid off.  If you look at Foxglove's page numbers in the top corner, the 26th was towards the end of an old book (page 56) and the 27th is on page 1 of a new book.  The original logs for that entire voyage (months? years?) have been sent back to the Admiralty, and the ship's company redistributed to new assignments.  Then after a couple of days of juggling, another crew and set of officers come aboard and a new set of original logs is started for the new voyage.

It was kind of fun to see that normal turnover happen right on the pages in front of me. :)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on March 19, 2011, 06:35:54 pm
Group outing to Sierra Leone:

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-76852/ADM%2053-76852-0179_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on March 19, 2011, 06:50:33 pm
Confused log keeper - Captain of Portuguese Vessel Paid Official Vessel  ;D

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-76852/ADM%2053-76852-0183_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: ElisabethB on March 20, 2011, 12:30:31 am
not so much riveting, but more a variation on a theme : 'lost by neglect'.  :D
Just before the 11.30 Quinine Parade
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-76852/ADM%2053-76852-0036_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on March 20, 2011, 12:41:40 am
Ouch - that hydrographer watch is probably very expensive!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on March 20, 2011, 06:42:13 pm
The hazards of a dirty bottom - it affects your speed!  See the entry for 14.30 ....

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-72548/ADM%2053-72548-013_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on March 21, 2011, 02:41:45 pm
Free Turkish rifles

See the 10.30 entry. http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-53182/ADM%2053-53182-006_0.jpg

Served out Turkish Rifles to ships company.

This is following the battle for Basra in the Mesopotamia Campaign

K
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: LupusUK on March 21, 2011, 07:45:37 pm
Mr Reid in trouble:-

Had occasion to caution Mr Reid, Signal Boatswain, for neglect of duty, in that he, while in charge of wireless telegraphy signals, did not take sufficient steps with regard to a signal from flagship

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-45999/ADM%2053-45999-027_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Caro on March 22, 2011, 07:57:09 am
Interesting times on the Knight Templar.

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 22, 2011, 08:01:24 am
Interesting times on the Knight Templar.
Sorry if this is an obvious question, but just what does 'forecast' mean in this context? A guess based on their own weather observations? Or did someone just tell them 'Watch out, there's a hurricane coming, we heard it on the news'?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Caro on March 22, 2011, 08:09:57 am
Ah. It's not hurricane forecast, it's hurricane force.  :D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Geoff on March 22, 2011, 10:08:41 am
The Dwarf gunboat is busy around the coast of Cameroon in late December 1914. Proceeds along the coast "bombarding" several towns.

On 30th December 1914:

"Weighed and procd. to Buambi [?]. Bombarded. Capt & party landed
Landing party returned having burnt down houses & destroyed telephones"

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-40444/ADM53-40444-097_0.jpg (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-40444/ADM53-40444-097_0.jpg)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: LupusUK on March 22, 2011, 09:08:29 pm
They are having a careless day on HMS Lancaster (1st Nov 1913)

Morning
Broken by accident Mercurial Barometer No Z 497

Luckily for us they seem to have a replacement
Commenced taking readings by aneroid

Then in the afternoon
Lost overboard by accident Reflectors yard arm Pattn. 614 1 in No

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-45999/ADM%2053-45999-029_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 22, 2011, 11:59:43 pm
The Dwarf gunboat is busy around the coast of Cameroon in late December 1914. Proceeds along the coast "bombarding" several towns.

On 30th December 1914:

"Weighed and procd. to Buambi [?]. Bombarded. Capt & party landed
Landing party returned having burnt down houses & destroyed telephones"

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-40444/ADM53-40444-097_0.jpg (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-40444/ADM53-40444-097_0.jpg)
I think that must be Longi - that's what it looks like to me, and according to Fuzzy Gazetteer there's a place in the Southern Province of Cameroon called Longi, and it seems to be near the coast.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on March 23, 2011, 07:16:45 am
A paymaster and a marine nip to the hole in the wall...

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-58282/ADM%2053-58282-079_1.jpg

I wonder whether the marine was to make sure the paymaster didn't nick anything, or whether the paymaster was to help the marine count?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 23, 2011, 07:57:37 am
Maybe the paymaster looked a bit frail and the marine was there to ensure he wouldn't get mugged along the way?;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on March 24, 2011, 06:37:20 pm
Interesting times on Capetown; they're erecting marquees on the jetty in preparation for a dance (no sign of the actual dance yet); dressing the ship for the King's Birthday (Calcutta gets to fire the 21 gun salute though  :()
And then someone sinks a buoy and is 'warned to be more careful in future' - I wonder if he'd been anticipating the dance?  As Capetown doesn't seem to be going anywhere much at present, sinking anything is quite a feat.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-72548/ADM%2053-72548-046_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Randi on March 24, 2011, 08:09:28 pm
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-33655/ADM53-33655-154_1.jpg

Not so much a riveting entry as a riveting ship (no pun intended).
SS Fram was boarded at 0450 by HMS Andes whilst carrying "Metals and machinery" from New York to Bergen.

This the ship that took Nansen, Sverdrup and Amundsen on their Polar travels. Well, maybe it's another Fram but I still think the name is worth a mention. The Polar ship now rests in a museum in Oslo, open to the public.

I saw it when we visited Oslo - MANY years ago!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 24, 2011, 11:40:33 pm
Looks like we've got a royal sub-lieutenant on board now (see noon entry): ;)
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-54572/ADM%2053-54572-017_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on March 24, 2011, 11:43:49 pm
Does the "Windsor" surname always denote a member of the royal family?  [Forgive me, I'm not from Great Britain.]
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 24, 2011, 11:49:46 pm
Does the "Windsor" surname denote a member of the royal family?  [Forgive me, I'm not from Great Britain.]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_of_Windsor
Even the date fits - this is July 1917. :P
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on March 24, 2011, 11:52:58 pm
So cool.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on March 25, 2011, 03:21:56 pm
Oh dear - we seem to have misplaced some crew members (please see the entries at the bottom of the page)
 
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-77624/ADM%2053-77624-0015_0.jpg

Luckily, they turn up the next day -

yours -

Kathy W.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 25, 2011, 03:37:20 pm
Some strange rigmarole going on about ships forming lines and whatnot. Probably for the benefit of the RA.
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-54573/ADM%2053-54573-005_1.jpg
Also, until this point I wasn't actually aware that we had an 'Irish Base'. I assume it's Belfast, but I don't really know. ???

Also, short but sad:
Quote from: 4 August, 1917
Passed upturned life-boat.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on March 25, 2011, 05:02:37 pm
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-53193/ADM%2053-53193-008_1.jpg

See the 5.20pm entry.

I expect we will see the quality of the logs drop significantly if the new writer is only 3rd class. Although perhaps the one we have is only 4th class so it will improve

Who knows?

K
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: studentforever on March 25, 2011, 06:05:50 pm
Don't forget that during WW1 the whole of Ireland was British. The partition only happened in the early 1920s and even then the Irish had a special status in the UK.

Part of the problem for convoys in WW2 was the lack of the Irish bases for naval and air support because Ireland had elected to remain neutral. It should be said that many men chose to volunteer for the British forces anyway but the state housed a German embassy with consequent intelligence problems for the UK.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: farrelly on March 25, 2011, 08:17:53 pm
   * Quote

Some strange rigmarole going on about ships forming lines and whatnot. Probably for the benefit of the RA.
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-54573/ADM%2053-54573-005_1.jpg
Also, until this point I wasn't actually aware that we had an 'Irish Base'. I assume it's Belfast, but I don't really know. ???

I see that Arlanza was in that port as well.  Nothing called "Irish base" ever appeared in is logs, but it did visit Belfast as well as Cork and other Irish harbors near Cork.  I have no special knowledge, but I gathered from the references to ships lining up abreast that they were sweeping for mines or submarines around the entrance to the harbor, perhaps using their paravanes.  Arlanza wasn't a minesweeper, but I think it did engage in some of that.

I wouldn't feel too bad about the lifeboat: could have been swept overboard, or used as a decoy by Germans.  Elsewhere in this forum there are references to RN ships shooting at & sinking them.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on March 25, 2011, 08:43:04 pm
War is declared, no mention in Rosario's logs. Wonder whether the message took a while to get through, or whether the outbreak of a world war just wasn't considered noteworthy...

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-58282/ADM%2053-58282-148_0.jpg

Articles of war read the next day, wonder whether it's just coincidental?

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-58282/ADM%2053-58282-148_1.jpg

Aha, I think the message has got through - mass exodus from Hong Kong.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-58282/ADM%2053-58282-149_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 25, 2011, 09:26:38 pm
Don't forget that during WW1 the whole of Ireland was British. The partition only happened in the early 1920s and even then the Irish had a special status in the UK.
I know, but we got there within less than a day of leaving Glasgow and we only passed Fanad and Tory Island about five hours after leaving this 'Irish Base', so Belfast is by far the most plausible option, no?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: farrelly on March 25, 2011, 10:14:47 pm
Don't forget that during WW1 the whole of Ireland was British. The partition only happened in the early 1920s and even then the Irish had a special status in the UK.
I know, but we got there within less than a day of leaving Glasgow and we only passed Fanad and Tory Island about five hours after leaving this 'Irish Base', so Belfast is by far the most plausible option, no?

hmm. the lat/long shown for 8 pm  on the log page seem to be somewhere off west the coast of Ireland, north of the Aran Islands (55 28n, 8 25w, converted to decimal 55.466667 / -8.416667) Can that be right?. Not near a harbor at all.  Makes no sense. see map: http://www.worldcountries.info/Maps/GoogleMap-Ireland.php
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 25, 2011, 10:42:58 pm
hmm. the lat/long shown for 8 pm  on the log page seem to be somewhere off west the coast of Ireland, north of the Aran Islands (55 28n, 8 25w, converted to decimal 55.466667 / -8.416667) Can that be right?. Not near a harbor at all.  Makes no sense. see map: http://www.worldcountries.info/Maps/GoogleMap-Ireland.php
The Aran Islands? But I thought they were somewhere on the west coast, in the general area of Galway? ???
No, that definitely isn't possible, because I'd have noticed if we had travelled that far along the coast of Ireland (and at the speed at which the Patia is normally travelling, it couldn't have covered that distance within less than 24 hours anyway). It must be somewhere quite close to Glasgow, partly because we got there so quickly and partly because there weren't any sightings of lighthouses which I hadn't passed before on the way to / from Glasgow. And that pretty much restricts it to Antrim, although I suppose it could be a smaller port somewhere slightly further north than Belfast.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 25, 2011, 10:45:14 pm
By the way, my marvellous log-keeper has come up with a creative new wind direction (see 6pm entry): SLly. ;D
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-54573/ADM%2053-54573-006_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: farrelly on March 26, 2011, 01:00:05 am
I'm just sayin' . . .

I was trying to figure out what the harbor was, using the ship's log lat/long entry (for 8 pm) and it looks to me like somewhere off the west coast of Ireland, as you say.

 I was curious because Arlanza was mentioned in the log, and this lining up abreast was probably mentioned in its logs, as well.  It would take me forever to find it by date, though.
Title: Aran/Arran
Post by: Lancsgreybeard on March 26, 2011, 03:52:53 am
Could it possibly be The Isle of Arran which is in the Firth of Clyde due W of Ayr?

LGB
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 26, 2011, 08:05:58 am
I'm just sayin' . . .

I was trying to figure out what the harbor was, using the ship's log lat/long entry (for 8 pm) and it looks to me like somewhere off the west coast of Ireland, as you say.

 I was curious because Arlanza was mentioned in the log, and this lining up abreast was probably mentioned in its logs, as well.  It would take me forever to find it by date, though.
Sorry, it looks like I misremembered: we actually left Glasgow on the evening of 1 August and spent all of 2 August at sea: http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-54573/ADM%2053-54573-004_1.jpg
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-54573/ADM%2053-54573-005_0.jpg
We sighted Fanad Pt about an hour before reaching the 'Irish Base', and that's on the north coast of Donegal, so I suppose we could have got a lot further than I'd assumed, but not as far as the west coast, really.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on March 26, 2011, 05:01:16 pm
A nice example of international cooperation:  (See the 7005 am entry)

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-77624/ADM%2053-77624-0018_0.jpg

 ;D

yours -

Kathy
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: studentforever on March 26, 2011, 05:51:44 pm
And the boat race is on TV!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on March 26, 2011, 09:52:13 pm
A nice example of international cooperation:  (See the 7005 am entry)

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-77624/ADM%2053-77624-0018_0.jpg

 ;D

yours -

Kathy

Merlin has been sending his first Engineman and the 1st Engineman from the Robin over to help the Towhee repair its engines.  They have been circling around the Towhee until the repairs are effected.   Not as much fun as sharing a boat for a race, but a nice example of cooperation.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 26, 2011, 10:47:36 pm
This must be the most temperature readings I've ever seen in a single log page. :-\
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-54573/ADM%2053-54573-013_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on March 26, 2011, 11:15:53 pm
Such beautiful handwriting!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 26, 2011, 11:22:03 pm
Such beautiful handwriting!
Beatiful enough to tempt you to join the Patia?;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on March 27, 2011, 12:36:58 am
DHomel is correct about the handwriting, and I think some young officer was on punishment duty to take so many readings!

What surprised me was the cold - to spend an entire AUGUST morning in the 30s while dodging icebergs!! :o
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 27, 2011, 12:43:33 am
DHomel is correct about the handwriting, and I think some young officer was on punishment duty to take so many readings!

What surprised me was the cold - to spend an entire AUGUST morning in the 30s while dodging icebergs!! :o
We were very close to Greenland at the time - I think the trip to see the icebergs, along with the constant readings and all the fancy new drills we're suddenly exercising may have been to impress the Rear Admiral.;) Before he came on board, we never did any 'submarine attack' exercises, and I doubt we'll keep doing them now that he's left (which is a bit unfortunate, because the Patia will be sunk by a German submarine in a few months' time, so maybe it would have been a good idea to do that exercise a bit more often).
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Press-ganged by the Swiss Navy on March 27, 2011, 09:36:34 pm
Here's a curious little incident:

"4.0 Brit: S.S. "Cavous" arr'd & asked for assistance due to fireman refusing duty. Sent escort & officers to investigate.
6.30 Escort returned with 10 fireman of "Cavous" under arrest."

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-33556/ADM53-33556-015_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on March 27, 2011, 11:02:25 pm
Such beautiful handwriting!
Beatiful enough to tempt you to join the Patia?;)

Well, when I finish with the Merlin, I will need to transfer somewhere, and if the Patia has not been completed by then, I would certainly consider it.   :D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 27, 2011, 11:20:37 pm
Well, when I finish with the Merlin, I will need to transfer somewhere, and if the Patia has not been completed by then, I would certainly consider it.   :D
Excellent. ;D I think once I've finished with the Patia's logs, I'll have to start a recruitment drive, because I'm currently the only active transcriber and there'll still be around 30% left after I'm done.

In other news, it's September 1917 now and we left Glasgow only to to hang about just outside the boom defence for about a week, doing nothing in particular. Every day, the captain and officers would be taken ashore in boats and collected again in the evening, until finally on the 28th, 'HM Yacht Albion III' left the port with an escort - which must have been the reason why we were dithering about for so long, because we stopped dithering shortly afterwards.
I wonder what that was all about? ???
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 28, 2011, 10:33:25 am
Another private has lost his cap overboard: http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-54575/ADM%2053-54575-004_0.jpg
Also, my wonderful (if muddle-brained) log-writer has been replaced by someone with horrible spiky writing and a really bad pen.:(
Edit: Only a day later, Private Smith loses his cap again - 'accidentally' this time: http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-54575/ADM%2053-54575-004_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on March 28, 2011, 01:36:04 pm
Um, were the caps particularly unattractive?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 28, 2011, 02:35:27 pm
Possibly. ;)
I'm beginning to feel rather sorry for the poor guy who is currently in the cells. They're monitoring the temperature in his cell on a regular basis, and while it started out at 68 degrees- making it the only well-heated place on board, no doubt - it has been steadily dropping over the past two days, (we're off the coast of Iceland at the moment and having an early cold snap) and it's now down to just 50. Obviously it's even colder outside, but at least the rest of the guys will get some exercise to keep themselves warm via the constant drills and the ever-popular deck-cleaning...
Update: I think the low temperatures in the cells might have been causing some concern, actually. On Sunday 7 October, the prisoner was briefly released and then evidently put back in the cells, because the temperature readings resumed in the evening, only they were suddenly considerably higher, so it looks as though they did something to heat it up, at least temporarily.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: bpb42 on March 29, 2011, 09:32:59 am
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-39992/0256_0.jpg

HMS Donegal, 4TH May 1916 has gone to Norway from Scapa Flow, spends
one night in a Fjord near Bergen, and returns to Scapa the next day.

The entry at 2pm reads, 'Embarked 15 members of Russian Duma'

It took a while to believe that actually said 'Russian Duma' but there are several
references to a delegation from Russia visting Britain, France & Norway in the spring of 1916
on the net, so I guess it's correct.



Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on March 29, 2011, 10:29:00 am
Nice find!  It's interesting to see how old "congressional junkets" are - I wonder if they also put all their side expenses on their bill to the taxpayers? ;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on March 29, 2011, 12:12:36 pm
HMS Clio has an officer wounded.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-38068/ADM-53-38068-089_0.jpg

The background is that she is supporting the British and Indian push northwards against Turkish troops in modern Iraq in May 1915. On previous days she has landed troops who have burned villages and driven out the Arabs who were supporting the Turks.

She has supplied Lt Commander Cookson and some marines to crew the Shusan, presumably some type of launch or small tug, who go up a creek off the Euphrates to explore.

This is the area of the marsh Arabs. (A bellum is a flat bottomed boat used in that area.)

Lt Com Cookson & 3 soldiers wounded. Cookson was sent to the military hospital in Basra the next day.

K

PS I just learned while searching for something else that Lt Commander Edgar Cookson of the Clio was killed in a later incident in the same area and received a posthumous VC. http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/8160726

Quite a remarkable tale and probably deserves more than a PS in a Riveting Log entry.

RIP Lt Commander Cookson.

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: bpb42 on March 29, 2011, 12:16:19 pm
I would guess so -apparently,  things were pretty bad in Russia at that point.

It's just nice to find a specific reason in the logs for why the ship is going to a particular place
or doing something.

Bernie
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 29, 2011, 07:43:07 pm
The temperature of the cells has dropped to 48 degrees again - that's only just above water temperature. Maybe the prisoner would be better off swimming?;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 29, 2011, 08:00:07 pm
Apparently the Patia got a bit lost and had to get help:
Quote from: 15 October 1917
Challenged HMS Artois. Requested Bearing & Distance of Butt of Lewis.
They must have told us, because we sighted it about two hours later.;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 30, 2011, 12:26:02 am
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-54575/ADM%2053-54575-015_1.jpg
8.40 am: 'Stopped for Burial on Board s/s Stentor' - erm, what? ???
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on March 30, 2011, 12:41:24 am
A number of ships have similar notes in the logs - a funeral party going off ship to show respect, with no name listed.  It has always been when the death happened aboard a different ship or barraks, whose crew is known to our crew.  The equivalent of showing up to support a friend who lost someone you don't know well.  When the funeral was for crew on another RN ship, we can find the name on Naval-History.net.  When it's on a foreign ship, or as here on a commercial steamer, we usually never know.

I take it as a sign of the naval community being bigger than any one organization.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 30, 2011, 11:20:11 am
Apparently we've just granted leave to the Glaswegians only. Odd. :-\
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on March 30, 2011, 11:30:15 am
"Apparently we've just granted leave to the Glaswegians only. Odd."

You do realise that leave to the Glaswegians is of course leave for the rest as well. (with apologies to any Glaswegian OWers)

K
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 30, 2011, 11:32:59 am
"Apparently we've just granted leave to the Glaswegians only. Odd."

You do realise that leave to the Glaswegians is of course leave for the rest as well. (with apologies to any Glaswegian OWers)

K
No it isn't. The entry specifically said 'Local men granted leave'.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on March 30, 2011, 11:38:28 am
Sorry, I was making a silly joke.

If the Glaswegians are ashore the remainder of the crew has a rest from them!!!

K
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 30, 2011, 12:01:43 pm
Sorry, I was making a silly joke.

If the Glaswegians are ashore the remainder of the crew has a rest from them!!!

K
Oh, right. Sorry, I'm a bit slow this morning. ;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on March 30, 2011, 12:12:42 pm
No problem, as long as you are not Glaswegian!!!

K
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 30, 2011, 12:15:16 pm
Luckily for you I'm not. ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on March 30, 2011, 12:31:25 pm
Phew, no Glasgow Kiss then!!!

K
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on March 30, 2011, 02:26:36 pm
So, would a Glasgow Kiss be a punch in the mouth?  ;D

yours -

Kathy W.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 30, 2011, 02:29:48 pm
It gets stranger still:
Quote from: 1 November, 1917
One Seaman returned from agricultural leave.
What's that supposed to mean, some kind of euphemism?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on March 30, 2011, 02:41:54 pm
He was probably a farmer who volunteered or was conscripted into the Navy (did the Navy use conscription during WWI?) and allowed to go home to help with the harvest...

yours -

Kathy W.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 30, 2011, 02:53:27 pm
Someone's in trouble...;)
Quote from: 4 November 1917
Cautioned Mr Charles S. Jacobson Temp Eng Sub-Lieut RNR for conduct unbecoming an Officer, in that, on the night of 4th Nov 1917, in company with Mids Thomas A Onions RNR he introduced clandestinely two females into the ship.
and
Quote from: 4 November 1917
Cautioned Midshipman Thomas A. Onions. Royal Naval Reserve for disobedience of orders, an conduct unbecoming an officer, whereas on the night of 4th Nov. 1917 he returned on board after 11 pm, contrary to orders, and introduced clandestinely two females into the ship.
For some reason Onions signed but Jacobson's signature is missing.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-54576/ADM%2053-54576-005_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on March 30, 2011, 03:02:28 pm
So, would a Glasgow Kiss be a punch in the mouth?  ;D


A Glasgow kiss is a head butt, usually to the face.

Glaswegians are often portrayed as violent and drunken. Perhaps many were in WW1 when there was lots of shipbuilding and other heavy industry but it is a stereotype which I should not promote.

Once again my apologies to any Glaswegians.

K

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on March 30, 2011, 03:08:32 pm
Someone's in trouble...;)
Quote from: 4 November 1917
Cautioned Mr Charles S. Jacobson Temp Eng Sub-Lieut RNR for conduct unbecoming an Officer, in that, on the night of 4th Nov 1917, in company with Mids Thomas A Onions RNR he introduced clandestinely two females into the ship.
and
Quote from: 4 November 1917
Cautioned Midshipman Thomas A. Onions. Royal Naval Reserve for disobedience of orders, an conduct unbecoming an officer, whereas on the night of 4th Nov. 1917 he returned on boar after 11 pm, contrary to orders, and introduced clandestinely two females into the ship.
For some reason Onions signed but Jacobson's signature is missing.


Awhile ago, on Merlin, I had a similar instance in which the miscreant signed the log, but no officer had, and was advised by cyzaki that the miscreant is the one who signs to show that the record is a true recording of what happened.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 30, 2011, 03:12:11 pm
Awhile ago, on Merlin, I had a similar instance in which the miscreant signed the log, but no officer had, and was advised by cyzaki that the miscreant is the one who signs to show that the record is a true recording of what happened.
Yes, but if you look at the log page, you'll see that they're treated as two separate cautions and there's a space for Jacobson's signature as well. So you'd have expected both to sign, no? ???
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on March 30, 2011, 03:14:38 pm
Very curious, indeed.   :o
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on March 30, 2011, 09:55:45 pm
Someone's got a sense of humour - it's the last day of 1914...

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-58283/ADM%2053-58283-037_1.jpg

Any ideas as to how I log that?  ???
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 30, 2011, 10:06:12 pm
Someone's got a sense of humour - it's the last day of 1914...

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-58283/ADM%2053-58283-037_1.jpg

Any ideas as to how I log that?  ???
Leave the day blank and add 'last' via 'event - other'?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on March 30, 2011, 10:18:48 pm
Someone's got a sense of humour - it's the last day of 1914...

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-58283/ADM%2053-58283-037_1.jpg

Any ideas as to how I log that?  ???
Leave the day blank and add 'last' via 'event - other'?

Hah! You took my hint!

And that was what I was thinking, it's nice to have backup  :D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on March 31, 2011, 03:23:00 pm
Not riveting, but interesting nonetheless, because I did wonder about how often those kind of accidents might have occurred.
Quote from: 25 November 1917
One page cut out & destroyed owing to spilling of ink in rough weather. - H.C. Bond
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on March 31, 2011, 04:21:19 pm
Not riveting, but interesting nonetheless, because I did wonder about how often those kind of accidents might have occurred.
Quote from: 25 November 1917
One page cut out & destroyed owing to spilling of ink in rough weather. - H.C. Bond

Merlin has had several entries along the lines of "Rolling and pitching heavily," and my mental picture of a storm so great that it makes a large, weighty ship, "pitch and roll heavily"--well, that would be some storm.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on April 01, 2011, 09:10:45 pm
What a great mixture of the amazing and the mundane...see the 8:00am entry -

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-77624/ADM%2053-77624-0032_0.jpg

yours -

Kathy W.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on April 01, 2011, 09:13:53 pm
I'm intrigued that they would dress the ship in honor of an American, and one who rebelled, at that.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on April 01, 2011, 09:16:46 pm
February 22nd is George Washington's birthday and a national holiday in the US, or it was before they combined it with Feb.12th Lincoln's birthday to make for one 'President's Day' holiday.  Why the RN is celebrating it in Hong Kong is a mite puzzling but flattering.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on April 01, 2011, 09:22:50 pm
I know! - it was one of those catch you by surprise moments when I read the entry - a sharp intake of breath thing (as they are called in my house  ;D ) I just love the Foxglove...

yours -

Kathy W.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on April 01, 2011, 09:25:02 pm
  :D  Yes, there is always something new in the logs...
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on April 02, 2011, 12:21:47 am
Losing an anchor is a really big deal, it seems :-\
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-54577/ADM%2053-54577-007_1.jpg
I wonder whether it was recovered later or whether it's still there.;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on April 02, 2011, 12:58:17 am

I wonder whether it was recovered later or whether it's still there.

My guess is "still there" but it would depend on just where they were.

A sparker survey of Lough Swilly, Co. Donegal, revealed two channels in the acoustic basement resulting from glacial overdeepening along fault lines. The first reaches a depth of 170 metres and is attributed to the Leannan fault.http://www.jstor.org/pss/20518918

240 feet of cable wouldn't make much impression on 170 metres, but it would be running out at quite a rate when it snagged.

What is it with anchors, all of a sudden? To paraphrase Admiral Beatty "There seems to be something wrong with our bloody anchors today."

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on April 02, 2011, 08:02:03 am
Not riveting so much as encouraging - I just had 4 or 5 pages from June, July and August 1915 in the middle of February 1915. The encouraging part is it showed me that if I just persist, eventually a log keeper with legible handwriting appears!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on April 02, 2011, 10:04:46 am
When you're on a ship and going through the same old routines all the time, it's easy to lose track of what day of the week it is. :P
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-54577/ADM%2053-54577-009_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on April 02, 2011, 02:01:42 pm


240 feet of cable wouldn't make much impression on 170 metres, but it would be running out at quite a rate when it snagged.

What is it with anchors, all of a sudden? To paraphrase Admiral Beatty "There seems to be something wrong with our bloody anchors today."

So did most ships carry a spare? 
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: bpb42 on April 02, 2011, 02:56:46 pm
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-39993/0032_0.jpg


HMS Donegal, in Cromarty, 20th July 1916;-
the entry at 11.10 PM (the last line on the log page) reads
'Ceased coaling owing to reports of Zeppelins'

Hopefully a false alarm.

Regards,
               Bernie
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on April 02, 2011, 04:31:00 pm
I think it has already been said various times: Too much liquor is not good for Lieutenants.

Must have been a heavy reprimand because it is written in red.

Also a lot of lightnings at 10pm (upper case and twice underlined)

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-37521/ADM53-37521-0173_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on April 02, 2011, 05:54:51 pm
CH
So did most ships carry a spare?  

You do ask interesting questions.


http://hansard.millbanksystems.com/commons/1860/jun/29/trotmans-anchors-question
He was informed that every ship in the navy carried four bower anchors, and he would suggest that one of those should be a Trotman, and that at the end of six months all the captains should be asked to send in a report of the manner in which they worked.

I've no idea what happened during the next six decades.

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Randi on April 02, 2011, 06:57:56 pm
You do come up with interesting responses.

How on earth did you find that?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on April 03, 2011, 01:16:56 pm
Not an interesting entry as such, but an ampersand which looks like a fly. ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on April 03, 2011, 03:38:43 pm
You do come up with interesting responses.

How on earth did you find that?

Must agree with randi_2.  The research skills of OW folks never cease to amaze me.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on April 03, 2011, 06:31:07 pm

You do come up with interesting responses.

How on earth did you find that?

Erm ... It's a thing I thought everyone knew.
Or to put it another way, I haven't got the foggiest.
It was easier than finding an anchor and 240 feet of cable in Lough Swilly.
I just stumbled upon it whilst looking for anchors through the ages. That Trotman guy devised an anchor that was so effective it was V. difficult to haul up, so it was not popular with ships' captains who had to manoeuvre the ship to dislodge it and sometimes broke the tackle. Hence, unlike Lt. Rodger's anchor, he didn't get a lot of support from the Admiralty. Now, the Martin anchor and the Martin - Adelphi version ... (had enough yet?)

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on April 03, 2011, 06:56:29 pm
After the prisoner shivering in his 48-degree cell on the way to Iceland, the Patia now has a prisoner being slow-roasted as the ship is approaching the equator. Maybe they reserved this as a punishment for particularly disobedient midshipmen? :-\
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on April 03, 2011, 10:29:28 pm
HMS Cricket, pootling up and down Chinese rivers, recently dressed ship overall in honour of the birthday of the Emperor of Japan. Today's festivities (4 Feb 1922) are a little more lively:

"2.30 arrived HMS Bee (Flag R.A. Yangtse Fleet) & saluted American Admiral with 13 guns. USS Isabel saluted RA Yangtse with 13 guns"

Real Mikado / Madam Butterfly stuff.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on April 03, 2011, 10:59:34 pm
HMS Cricket, take 2 (11 Feb 1922):

8.0 Dressed ship overall in honour of anniversary of coronation of first Japanese Emperor
12.0 HIJMS Saga & USS Isabel fired salutes in honour of anniversary of coronation of first Emperor of Japan. 6.15 Undressed ship.

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on April 03, 2011, 11:56:07 pm
If you are in Hong Kong in April 1922, you will be dressing and undressing for the Prince of Wales -

yours -

Kathy W.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on April 04, 2011, 12:16:39 am
If you are in Hong Kong in April 1922, you will be dressing and undressing for the Prince of Wales

Can't complain; it's what they pay me for.

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on April 04, 2011, 12:49:42 am
Cricket, again:

"Patt 31 sheets white cotton 1 in no. lost at the laundry in Hanhow on the 9th inst. Investigation no satisfactory results obtained owing to ship sailing that day"

Reminds me of a song from a less politically correct era:
http://www.lyrics007.com/George%20Formby%20Lyrics/Chinese%20Laundry%20Blues%20Lyrics.html
You may notice rhyming mismatches "flickers / blouses" and "tricky / waistcoat"; I am completely at a loss to explain these.
I haven't tried listening from this site, I don't recommend it.
It's available at spotify.com as is the sequel "Mr. Wu's a window cleaner now" and the unrelated "When I'm cleaning windows".


Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: LupusUK on April 04, 2011, 07:11:03 pm
Nice astronomical observation from HMS Lancaster 11th March 1914 at 10pm in Port Royal, Jamaica

moon eclipsed
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: ElisabethB on April 04, 2011, 09:17:48 pm
Nice astronomical observation from HMS Lancaster 11th March 1914 at 10pm in Port Royal, Jamaica

moon eclipsed
Aw, that's great.
Could you please post a link to this page. I'll post a link over on the MoonZoo forum, they'll love it.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: herbert47 on April 04, 2011, 09:35:32 pm
Hurricane!

(http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-46296/ADM%2053-46296-009_0.jpg)

All sorts of things blown away. Can't imagine being on a ship in force 12 winds! Can't imagine being anywhere in force 12 winds!

Was in a storm force 12 in the middle of the Atlantic in 1965, we lost everything moveable on the upper deck including the Captains Cutter. Very glad to dock in Bermuda a few days later.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: LupusUK on April 05, 2011, 05:59:49 am
Nice astronomical observation from HMS Lancaster 11th March 1914 at 10pm in Port Royal, Jamaica

moon eclipsed
Aw, that's great.
Could you please post a link to this page. I'll post a link over on the MoonZoo forum, they'll love it.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-45999/ADM%2053-45999-094_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on April 05, 2011, 01:47:44 pm
Nice astronomical observation from HMS Lancaster 11th March 1914 at 10pm in Port Royal, Jamaica

moon eclipsed
Aw, that's great.
Could you please post a link to this page. I'll post a link over on the MoonZoo forum, they'll love it.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-45999/ADM%2053-45999-094_1.jpg

So the MoonZoo folks like to get historical links to astronomical observations? All or just some? Maybe we should have a separate thread to post those, to make it easier to pass them along regularly.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on April 05, 2011, 02:02:28 pm
 :o ack Herbert47 - I would still be ill!  ;D :o

yours -

Kathy W.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: farrelly on April 05, 2011, 05:53:49 pm
Re herbert47:  At 11 p.m., it looks like even their gmail was carried away!

I found several references to the hurricane.

http://www.wunderground.com/hurricane/at191613.asp

 I wonder where the data came from for that diagram? (i.e., determining what the wind speeds were out in the Atlantic in 1916.)  The Laurentic's report of force 12 seems to indicate that the storm was still at the higher end of the "tropical storm" level - at least - on October 12.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: farrelly on April 06, 2011, 01:01:27 am
 here's the first riveting log entry I've come across on Wonganella - a submarine encounter, several seriously wounded:

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-68927/ADM%2053-68927-015_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: ElisabethB on April 06, 2011, 07:51:51 pm
Nice astronomical observation from HMS Lancaster 11th March 1914 at 10pm in Port Royal, Jamaica

moon eclipsed
Aw, that's great.
Could you please post a link to this page. I'll post a link over on the MoonZoo forum, they'll love it.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-45999/ADM%2053-45999-094_1.jpg

So the MoonZoo folks like to get historical links to astronomical observations? All or just some? Maybe we should have a separate thread to post those, to make it easier to pass them along regularly.
Not just the MoonZoo people !  :D
I remember when a comet was spotted in one of the OW logs and it got posted over on the GZ forum.
so I just thought it would be fun to post things like this in the other fora. Maybe we can even get some new members that way !  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on April 06, 2011, 10:41:52 pm
Ooh, that's a great idea!  Sneaky, too! ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on April 07, 2011, 05:35:24 pm
Quote from: 4 July 1916
Obs. patch of discouloured water in Lat 20S 1/2 N 39 35 1/2 E Long
What on earth is that supposed to mean? :-\ What colour is 'discoloured'? And why did they even bother to record this?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Randi on April 07, 2011, 05:47:17 pm
I've seen that a few times myself off the coast of S. America. I think they said redish once. I wonder if it was an algal bloom?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on April 07, 2011, 05:58:29 pm
I've seen that a few times myself off the coast of S. America. I think they said redish once. I wonder if it was an algal bloom?
Well, there's a war going on, it seems, so maybe not...
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-61874/ADM%2053-61874-007_1.jpg
This is rather more action than I'm used to after three years of northern patrol!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Randi on April 07, 2011, 07:32:11 pm
Sorry, I forgot to specify that I'm off ther Pacific coast. There is not much action here. I will pay more attention next time I get discolored water.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on April 07, 2011, 09:29:15 pm
Espiegle has just taken on 25 cases bullion - 100,000 rupees - for carriage to Bombay.  I hope not too many others know!

And they've lost 2 more hand scrubbers - it's a wonder they can still clean the ship at all, given how regularly they do that.  The Persian Gulf must be littered with them.  Perhaps it's a cunning plan to reduce the number who can be employed on the endless cleaning?

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-77067/ADM%2053-77067-0146_1.jpg

PHEW - they made it safely to Bombay and offloaded the bullion on 7th March.  And they managed to lose another 3 hand scrubbers plus a bosun's call on the way over - a result for the ratings I rather think. :D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on April 08, 2011, 04:24:42 pm
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-61878/ADM%2053-61878-015_1.jpg
9.30 am: 'Message from HM The King read to Ships Company by Captain'
I wonder whether it was a Christmas message?:)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on April 08, 2011, 05:14:21 pm
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-61878/ADM%2053-61878-015_1.jpg
9.30 am: 'Message from HM The King read to Ships Company by Captain'
I wonder whether it was a Christmas message?:)

Seems likely. Television reception would not have been too good.
He may have referred to one of the following:

"December 15 1916
French complete recapture of ground taken by Germans in Verdun battle.

December 18 1916
President Wilson requests statement of war objectives from warring nations in peace note. British offended by implication that their war aims are no more moral than Germany's" 

Sadly, no mention of "Up Spirits" but they did get tons of fresh water. (I wonder who asked Santa for that.)


Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on April 08, 2011, 07:10:18 pm
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-61878/ADM%2053-61878-015_1.jpg
9.30 am: 'Message from HM The King read to Ships Company by Captain'
I wonder whether it was a Christmas message?:)

A message from the King, 6.5 hours leave in Port Sudan for half the crew and fresh water. They certainly knew how to celebrate Christmas on the Suva

K
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on April 08, 2011, 07:21:54 pm
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-61878/ADM%2053-61878-015_1.jpg
9.30 am: 'Message from HM The King read to Ships Company by Captain'
I wonder whether it was a Christmas message?:)

A message from the King, 6.5 hours leave in Port Sudan for half the crew and fresh water. They certainly knew how to celebrate Christmas on the Suva

K
Yes, I was half expecting somebody to be cautioned for excessively festive spirit...
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: LupusUK on April 08, 2011, 08:55:27 pm
HMS Lancaster 4th April 1914 8.10pm

Fire Brigade returned. Fire engine dropped overboard in 7 fms while being hoisted in

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-45999/ADM%2053-45999-106_1.jpg

Oops :)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on April 08, 2011, 11:08:21 pm
BIG oops.  :o
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on April 09, 2011, 06:54:22 am
Not lost overboard but on Active Service a Zeiss spotting telescope. The loss was in 1916 but discovered in 1917. Better late than never  ::)

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-37520/ADM53-37520-0176_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: farrelly on April 09, 2011, 07:30:11 pm
Here's a riveting one - a submarine encounter.  See events beginning at 5 pm:

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-68927/ADM%2053-68927-043_1.jpg

Apparently no casualties from the Elele, if you don't count the ship itself:

ELELE, 6,557grt, defensively armed, 18 June 1917, 300 miles NW ? W from the Fastnet, torpedoed without warning and sunk by submarine
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on April 09, 2011, 09:09:04 pm
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-61869/ADM%2053-61869-017_0.jpg
Weird entry at 8.45am. It looks as though there's something missing there - carry out what. ???
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on April 11, 2011, 12:43:55 am
HMS Cricket at Shanghai.

Since the 7th August 1923 we've been flying the Ensign at half mast. Initial search failed to determine why. On 10th August further information "0800 Colours half-masted USS ensign hoisted at masthead at the dip." narrowed search parameter.
US President Warren G. Harding died in San Francisco on 2nd August. His body was sent by train to the White House, a journey of four days. People in their "millions lined the tracks in cities and towns across the country to pay their final respects." There was a state funeral on the 8th August before his body was laid in a tomb at Marion Cemetery Ohio on the 10th August.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on April 11, 2011, 03:29:27 pm
http://www.oldweather.org/classify?vessel_id=4caf8b00cadfd3419702ef35
Rather puzzling entry at 3.30 pm: 'Ben my Chree arrived in harbour'. Ben who? ???
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on April 11, 2011, 04:07:12 pm
http://www.oldweather.org/classify?vessel_id=4caf8b00cadfd3419702ef35
Rather puzzling entry at 3.30 pm: 'Ben my Chree arrived in harbour'. Ben who? ???


Or Ben Where  ???
I see no ships at 3.30pm and Suva is not in port. Are you feeding us a red herring? Have you got an alternative url?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Randi on April 11, 2011, 04:17:07 pm
http://www.oldweather.org/classify?vessel_id=4caf8b00cadfd3419702ef35
Rather puzzling entry at 3.30 pm: 'Ben my Chree arrived in harbour'. Ben who? ???


Or Ben Where  ???
I see no ships at 3.30pm and Suva is not in port. Are you feeding us a red herring? Have you got an alternative url?

I have the same problem as Bunts. The line at 3:30pm that I see is blank - and I have probably just joined the crew!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: farrelly on April 11, 2011, 04:20:39 pm
same problem here.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on April 11, 2011, 04:21:52 pm
I have the same problem as Bunts. The line at 3:30pm that I see is blank
 

Thanks for confirmation: so it's not just the old "telescope/blind eye" phenomenon.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: farrelly on April 11, 2011, 04:24:23 pm

As my mother used to say, "I see, said the blind man, as he picked up his hammer and saw."
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on April 11, 2011, 04:38:14 pm

As my mother used to say, "I see, said the blind man, as he picked up his hammer and saw."


Yo' Momma ...

That explains quite a lot.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on April 11, 2011, 07:01:53 pm
http://www.oldweather.org/classify?vessel_id=4caf8b00cadfd3419702ef35
Rather puzzling entry at 3.30 pm: 'Ben my Chree arrived in harbour'. Ben who? ???

When I opened it, "Suva" was in Port Sudan, but no ships were mentioned anywhere on the page.

Mutabilitie, this is why we ask for the JPEG links, even though the new-and-improved site actually allows us to open the regular links now - the editing links are simply not stable, we all get different pages on the computer's assumption that we are just new crew for the Suva.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on April 11, 2011, 07:17:22 pm
http://www.oldweather.org/classify?vessel_id=4caf8b00cadfd3419702ef35
Rather puzzling entry at 3.30 pm: 'Ben my Chree arrived in harbour'. Ben who? ???

When I opened it, "Suva" was in Port Sudan, but no ships were mentioned anywhere on the page.

Mutabilitie, this is why we ask for the JPEG links, even though the new-and-improved site actually allows us to open the regular links now - the editing links are simply not stable, we all get different pages on the computer's assumption that we are just new crew for the Suva.


Oo-er!
Apologies, randi; I thought you were just being paranoid. With this new info, I checked and found that I had been shanghai-ed by Suva. (By coincidence, "my" HMS Cricket is at Shanghai.) Thank goodness the "unfollow" option is there. Assuming you didn't submit a page you can jump ship with me. When I say"with me" I'm not suggesting anything improper, you understand (other than desertion). I hope that doesn't cause any disappointment.
On the other hand ...
 ;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Randi on April 11, 2011, 07:34:01 pm
I'm TERRIBLY(underlined) disappointed  ;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on April 11, 2011, 09:27:49 pm
Bleh. Sorry, I was in a bit of a rush and accidentally posted the wrong link. :-[ I meant this page: http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-61870/ADM%2053-61870-009_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on April 11, 2011, 09:32:25 pm
'Ben my Chree' sounds a bit like a Gaelic name mispelled - or at least the 'my' bit doesn't sound Gaelic but the rest does.  Any ships of that name?

Helen J
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on April 11, 2011, 09:42:17 pm
The only mispelling is leaving the dashes out, and it is Manx:  HMS Ben-my-Chree (Manx: "Lady of My Heart") (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Ben-my-Chree) is a "packet steamer and a Royal Navy seaplane carrier ... she was the platform for the first ship-launched airborne torpedo attack on a ship on 12 August 1915."

I did not know that the Isle of Man had its own language - or is that Gaelic?  We learn something new every day here.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: studentforever on April 11, 2011, 10:09:08 pm
Manx is one of the Gaelic languages, I forget whether it is P or Q. I travelled from Liverpool to the Isle of Man or vice versa on a 'Ben-my-Chree' when I was a young child. It was an 'old' ship around 1950 so whether it was the same one I don't know.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on April 12, 2011, 09:33:07 am
Thanks everyone - I never expected to come across ship names in Manx. :o
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Lancsgreybeard on April 12, 2011, 03:57:00 pm
The Isle of Man Steam Packet Company still operates a vessel with the name "Ben-my Chree", see

http://www.steam-packet.com/SteamPacket/1ColumnTemplate.aspx?NRMODE=Published&NRNODEGUID={329F2B4F-CC09-45A3-A519-AB339A4F1B0E}&NRORIGINALURL=/SteamPacket/About-Us/Our-Vessels.htm&NRCACHEHINT=ModifyGuest#Ben-my-Chree

The company provided a number of vessels for service during both World Wars as shown in Wikipedia

LGB
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on April 12, 2011, 05:20:22 pm
Not sure that this is "riveting," but it snagged my interest.

Merlin's log, 23 January 1919

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-49091/ADM%2053-49091-014_1.jpg

12.45 pm:  Landed dental party.
3.45 pm:  Dental party returned.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on April 12, 2011, 09:40:59 pm
A sailor needs his rum.

5.25 Charon arrd. Recd. 3 casks of rum

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-37521/ADM53-37521-0108_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on April 13, 2011, 07:38:39 pm
Again an item to add to the long list of lost overboard.

This time it is a peace of a sounding gear. I hope I deciphered correctly what it was.  ???

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-37521/ADM53-37521-0112_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: shippeb on April 14, 2011, 02:07:30 pm
When I was entering events for 12 September 1920 on Yarmouth (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-69211/ADM53-69211-104_1.jpg) my heart sank at seeing the notation "reported 'man overboard' from aft.  I was in suspense the whole time I was entering the details:

8.10 Reported "man overboard" from aft.  Co and speed as reqte.  Dropped both lifebuoys. 
8.16.  Slipped starbd sea boat.  Working searchlights as reqte. 
8.42 Dropped 2nd sea boat. 
9.0 Hoisted 1st lifeboat and lifebuoys - hands mustered by open list. 
9.20 Correct.
9.30 Hoisted 2nd lifeboat. 
9.45 Proceeded co 202 deg 135 Revs.  Streamed p. log

I was very glad to be posting here, not on the "buried at sea" topic...
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on April 14, 2011, 03:28:52 pm
Again an item to add to the long list of lost overboard.

This time it is a peace of a sounding gear. I hope I deciphered correctly what it was.  ???

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-37521/ADM53-37521-0112_1.jpg
Looks like 'one Sinker, stray line and tube' to me.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on April 14, 2011, 08:13:09 pm
Thanks, Mutabilitie

I couldn't read the second word. and now it makes more easy to understand.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on April 15, 2011, 01:12:38 pm
A latitude by Canopus

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-37521/ADM53-37521-0125_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on April 15, 2011, 03:32:46 pm
Ingenious.
A 93 year head-start in setting the pattern for cost cutting within the armed services.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on April 15, 2011, 10:32:20 pm
Not a very happy entry at 11.30.

It is the first time that I have to transcribe something like that.

Poor boy, whatever he had done I think that corporal punishment is not justified but it was allowed in the Royal Navy's regulations at that time.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-37521/ADM53-37521-0142_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on April 16, 2011, 04:40:17 pm
Captain A.C.Sykes left ship after 4 years in command, but as Commander Smart took over waiting for Captain Grant Dalton, the log keeper went a bit lazy with his weather annotations and locations.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-37521/ADM53-37521-0163_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on April 17, 2011, 09:51:31 pm
Clearly dhows are not the safest ships to be travelling on...
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-61876/ADM%2053-61876-005_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on April 17, 2011, 11:43:53 pm
Clearly dhows are not the safest ships to be travelling on...

I wonder whether the prize money exceeded the replacement cost of the small arms.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on April 19, 2011, 04:25:30 pm
What an odd day on the Foxglove -

the first death that I have seen  :(
a court of inquiry (why did the crew of the Albion Star report his death?  What happened?)
a formal visit
coaling

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-77627/ADM%2053-77627-0004_1.jpg

Kathy W.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on April 19, 2011, 04:47:27 pm
The most riveting thing that's happened on the Rosario for about a year - one rating got so bored of the tedium of cleaning and painting and never doing anything else at all, that he's decided to go home.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-58292/ADM%2053-58292-016_0.jpg

Ooh! Spoke too soon! We have moved! All the way to the... dry dock...  :-\

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-58292/ADM%2053-58292-019_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on April 19, 2011, 05:50:34 pm
What an odd day on the Foxglove -

the first death that I have seen  :(
a court of inquiry (why did the crew of the Albion Star report his death?  What happened?)
a formal visit
coaling

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-77627/ADM%2053-77627-0004_1.jpg

Kathy W.

Foxglove, fleet sweeping sloop

From the record of Naval Casualties for 1922. Not much help I am afraid.

 KNIGHT, John A, Leading Stoker, K 20738, drowned

RIP John Knight

Sorry, having posted this I realise that you have also posted the information into the burials at sea, so presumably have already seen the casualty list.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on April 19, 2011, 07:29:49 pm
That is quite alright - I'm glad we share with each other -

I can't decide if we are a flock of birds chirping away at each other, or if we are more like the women in Monty Python (Oh, aye dear, have you heard... ;D)

Kathy
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on April 20, 2011, 05:33:11 pm
It is the first time that I read about a warrant read to the Ship Company.

A recording party left to Pickle and than a prisoner was sent under escort to Thistle.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-37522/ADM53-37522-0016_1.jpg

My curiosity has been roused and I think that as soon the warrants are made public the admiralty will be flooded with questions about them.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on April 20, 2011, 06:04:00 pm
22nd April 1916 on Patia, on Northern Patrol, found this fascinating entry:
'Vice Admiral Tupper came aboard to present medal and inspect ships company.'
Does anyone know of any way of finding out who the medal might have been for, and why?  Nothing dramatic has happened on Patia recently, but I haven't been on board very long.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-54557/ADM%2053-54557-014_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on April 20, 2011, 09:18:08 pm
The clams attack at midnight  :o

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-58293/ADM%2053-58293-103_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on April 20, 2011, 10:46:35 pm
It is the first time that I read about a warrant read to the Ship Company.

A recording party left to Pickle and than a prisoner was sent under escort to Thistle.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-37522/ADM53-37522-0016_1.jpg

My curiosity has been roused and I think that as soon the warrants are made public the admiralty will be flooded with questions about them.

When might the warrants be released?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on April 21, 2011, 05:29:53 am
Quote
When might the warrants be released?

All naval court records are under a 99 year seal.  So these will be open in 2018.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on April 22, 2011, 09:39:10 pm
The clams attack at midnight  :o

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-58293/ADM%2053-58293-103_1.jpg
;D
That should go in the 'Worse things happen at sea' thread, really.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on April 22, 2011, 10:50:44 pm
The clams attack at midnight  :o

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-58293/ADM%2053-58293-103_1.jpg

 ;D ;D ;D  Thanks for a good laugh!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on April 23, 2011, 05:25:05 pm
Sorry I cannot make you laugh but maybe there will be some occasions for a good laugh.

His Majesty's Ship Challenger has been paid off this day first of April 1919

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-37528/ADM53-37528-0019_0.jpg

The pages following that last written page are empty.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: studentforever on April 23, 2011, 07:53:57 pm
Oh, sad. I've been 1st Lieut on Challenger for a while. Once the site crashed I can't get back because in a weak moment just before the crash I did a couple of pages on a ship I hadn't been on for months and I now can't reach Challenger on 'My Old Weather'. If it is still like this after the hols then I will alert the team but at the moment I am taking a vacation in Chungking on HMS Teal. She transcribes more quickly because not much seems to happen but I miss Challenger.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on April 23, 2011, 08:01:05 pm
What happens when you try to board Challenger?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on April 23, 2011, 09:01:56 pm
Oh, sad. I've been 1st Lieut on Challenger for a while. Once the site crashed I can't get back because in a weak moment just before the crash I did a couple of pages on a ship I hadn't been on for months and I now can't reach Challenger on 'My Old Weather'. If it is still like this after the hols then I will alert the team but at the moment I am taking a vacation in Chungking on HMS Teal. She transcribes more quickly because not much seems to happen but I miss Challenger.

My access to all my (unfinished) ships from My Old Weather is fine - could that have been a temporary glitch that is now fixed?  If not, please describe exactly what happens when you try for Challenger, so we can report it to the team Monday morning.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on April 23, 2011, 09:04:35 pm
Are the team working on Monday? It's another bank holiday, don'tcha know  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on April 23, 2011, 09:17:01 pm
No, I didn't know - how do you guys get a 4 day weekend out of a church holiday?  (Clearly lacking separation of church and state there. ;D  )
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on April 23, 2011, 09:25:52 pm
Got another one next weekend due to Royal Wedding on the Friday and another bank holiday on the Monday. Love it!  ;D

http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/Governmentcitizensandrights/LivingintheUK/DG_073741

And of course we're lacking separation of church and state - the head of state is the head of the church!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on April 23, 2011, 10:19:47 pm
What is amazing is bunching up into twos, instead of spreading them out a little more.  The standard is a 3 day weekend holiday here.  In the US, New Year's Day, Memorial Day (last Monday in May), July 4th, Labor Day (first Monday in September), Thanksgiving (last Thursday in November) and Christmas Day are official.  It's the same count as UK, six.  But they are more spread out, never in pairs.  There are many companies that also give the Friday after Thanksgiving off, but that is not governmental.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on April 23, 2011, 10:21:51 pm
It'd be nicer if they were spread out a bit, until you get to April/May, and then it's lovely  ;D

To be fair, they're only bunched up this year because Easter is so late. Then we've got some people called Wills and Kate who are getting married on Friday, which adds to the days off.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: studentforever on April 23, 2011, 10:35:09 pm
On 'my old weather', I get my last active ship as usual, map and first page of my previous ships list. Below that there used to be a list of pages which I could use to find the ships on my list. There are quite a lot because when I first joined, especially if I hadn't got much time, I just used to transcribe whichever ship came up. I think Challenger was on p4. Now I just get a small red square/rectangle towards the RHS of the page. I get the same thing at the bottom of the 'vessels' page but by using the search facility on that page I have managed to get back to Challenger.

I'm on windows 7 (starter version because I'm using my notebook at the moment), the latest version of IE and Norton.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: studentforever on April 23, 2011, 11:08:14 pm
Actually we have more than 6 holidays. Just to confuse people even more Scotland, England and Wales, Northern Ireland actually have some differences in holidays. Here in Glasgow we get Christmas Day (usually Boxing Day as well but that isn't official), New Year's Day, 2nd Jan, Easter Monday ( but not Good Friday), MayDay (1st Mon in May), Queen's birthday (Mon towards end of May but not always the last), Glasgow Fair (Fri & Mon in middle of July, not bank holiday), September week-end (usually last Mon in Sept but not always). Just to really confuse the incomer, not all these are Bank holidays, Paisley (just outside Glasgow and nearest town to Glasgow airport) doesn't take Queen's birthday but has Monday in June, has the Fair holiday 2 weeks later and an autumn day later than Glasgow's. Edinburgh is different again. After 40 years up here I can just about keep track but when I first moved up I was thrown into utter confusion by work being closed while the local shops were open (and vice versa) and banks being closed when we were at work (and sometimes vice versa as well). You can see why the bus companies post notices like Fri 22nd April - normal service, Mon 25th April - Sunday service, Fri 29th April - Sunday service etc. Banks also tend to post notices when they are closed as well.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on April 23, 2011, 11:20:56 pm
I totally believe it - I couldn't begin to get into the holidays that nobody but the government takes off for.  We call them Post Office holidays sometimes, because everything but the Federal Government Postal Service keeps running.  And sometimes, holidays that are different between state, city and federal get really confusing!

When I was young, there were post office holidays on Feb. 12 for Lincoln's birthday and Feb. 22 for Washington's birthday.  But everyone complained about holidays that close keeping them from their mail, so the Monday in between became Presidents' Day.  Except in Illinois which is Lincoln's home state, they have Feb. 12 Lincoln's birthday and Presidents' Days.  Except in Chicago, which is not Lincoln's home town, where the parking meters run on a non-holiday schedule even though the state offices are closed.

Just as one example. ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on April 23, 2011, 11:42:55 pm
All I know is I'm not complaining about a 2 week Easter holiday, followed by 3 days at school, followed by a 4 day weekend  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on April 24, 2011, 12:47:21 am
No sane student complains about that! ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Randi on April 24, 2011, 07:51:26 am
On 'my old weather', I get my last active ship as usual, map and first page of my previous ships list. Below that there used to be a list of pages which I could use to find the ships on my list. There are quite a lot because when I first joined, especially if I hadn't got much time, I just used to transcribe whichever ship came up. I think Challenger was on p4. Now I just get a small red square/rectangle towards the RHS of the page. I get the same thing at the bottom of the 'vessels' page but by using the search facility on that page I have managed to get back to Challenger.

I'm on windows 7 (starter version because I'm using my notebook at the moment), the latest version of IE and Norton.

I am having trouble with IE9 and Windows 7. With IE8 I didn't have problems - but of course something may have changed.
You might want to copy this to Technical Support, Interface Issues.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on April 24, 2011, 09:15:37 am
No sane student complains about that! ;D

Indeed. I'm a teacher though. And I don't think we're a sane bunch, as it goes...  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on April 24, 2011, 11:58:14 am
Yesterday I reported HMS Challenger being paid off. I was than thrown back in 1914 for a few pages I didn't transcribe. I still don't know how many are left.

Captain Beaty-Pownell left ship and Captain Fuller took over command.

I don't know if Captain Beaty-Pownell took over the command of H.M.S. Cumberland.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-37518/ADM%2053-37518-046_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on April 26, 2011, 10:42:41 pm
From the Foxglove
So it begins:
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-77628/ADM%2053-77628-0004_0.jpg

And continues...
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-77628/ADM%2053-77628-0004_1.jpg

Finally over!
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-77628/ADM%2053-77628-0005_0.jpg

Got to love the British Navy - awesome storm... still had tea every day and still had to clean up the decks!  ;D

Kathy W.


Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on April 27, 2011, 02:26:59 am
That log has got to be a copy - nobody can be that neat in a gale!!  The log-keeper makes it look so very neat and contained!!

Your logs do have beautiful handwriting.  I may join you for a bit, after I finish all the odd pages on Torch. :)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on April 27, 2011, 02:15:46 pm
Interesting but puzzling entry from the Suva's log:
Quote from: 7 December, 1916
Landed Party of One PO & Six Seamen to await arrival of aeroplane
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-61878/ADM%2053-61878-006_1.jpg
What's going on there? ???
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on April 27, 2011, 02:42:53 pm
you would be welcome - I do so love that log keeper's writing  ;D

I can't even imagine what that wind must have sounded like below decks -  I bet there were some sailors whose ears were ringing for days afterward  :D

Kathy W.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: portanucis on April 27, 2011, 03:16:36 pm
Sorry about that. Here is the corrected version.
 
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-45999/ADM%2053-45999-160_1.jpg
I wonder what this fellow drank to make him so ill.
It sure must have been potent stuff.
Cheers
Portanucis
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on April 27, 2011, 03:24:34 pm
Hi Portanucis -

I get sent to the Amazon hosting page with a message that the jpg can't be found - there is an r added to jpg -I think that needs to be removed - I would love to read the entry  ;D

Kathy W.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on April 27, 2011, 03:29:32 pm
Interesting but puzzling entry from the Suva's log:
Quote from: 7 December, 1916
Landed Party of One PO & Six Seamen to await arrival of aeroplane
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-61878/ADM%2053-61878-006_1.jpg
What's going on there? ???

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arab_Revolt

This site indicates that there was a Turkish attack on Yenbo in Dec 1916 that was repulsed by Arab forces with the help of one T. E. Lawrence and the British Navy. I guess the airplane may have been sent to help with that defence.

Hope this helps.

K
Title: Extra r
Post by: Lancsgreybeard on April 27, 2011, 03:33:51 pm
Kathy

When you click on the link the link appears in the "http" line complete with r

You now get an error message, click at the end of the line in "http" and delete the r

Voila - simples The Lancashire Meerkat
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on April 27, 2011, 03:38:01 pm
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-45999/ADM%2053-45999-160_1.jpgr

I wonder what this fellow drank to make him so ill.
It sure must have been potent stuff.
Cheers
Portanucis

9 days is some hangover.

As the location is Bermuda my money is on the local rum as opposed to His Majesty's own.
K
Title: Poorly carpenter
Post by: Lancsgreybeard on April 27, 2011, 03:43:41 pm
My money would be on Methanol which is likely to be stored on board for a variety of uses, it is also widely used in illegal alcohol.  As the carpenter found out it produces nasty side effects

lgb
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on April 27, 2011, 03:44:54 pm
Thanks LGB -

when I do that though, I get sent to a video on Yahoo Search Direct, beta version  :o

I'm beginning to think I'm just not supposed to read that page -  ;D

Kathy
Title: Poorly Carpenter
Post by: Lancsgreybeard on April 27, 2011, 03:53:50 pm
Kathy

Try this one

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-45999/ADM%2053-45999-160_1.jpg

I think that we should include

http://meerkat.comparethemarket.com/attention/?SRC=CNTV&utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=ppc&gclid=CJST9r75vKgCFcRtfAodvTeaEg

for the benefit of non uk residents

lgb
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on April 27, 2011, 04:07:37 pm
Thank you very much - that worked!  I do wonder about that ship - why were the special parties told off during prayers?  Is that a British Navy addition?  Where might I find that in the Book of Common Prayer?   ;D

Also, you have to wonder about insurance people - between the ducks, cavemen and meerkats... well, ya just got to wonder -

thanks again -

Kathy W.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on April 27, 2011, 10:19:46 pm
Interesting but puzzling entry from the Suva's log:
Quote from: 7 December, 1916
Landed Party of One PO & Six Seamen to await arrival of aeroplane
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-61878/ADM%2053-61878-006_1.jpg
What's going on there? ???

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arab_Revolt

This site indicates that there was a Turkish attack on Yenbo in Dec 1916 that was repulsed by Arab forces with the help of one T. E. Lawrence and the British Navy. I guess the airplane may have been sent to help with that defence.

Hope this helps.

K
Very interesting link, thank you. The Suva's log for the following day doesn't reveal much about the plane, unfortunately: http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-61878/ADM%2053-61878-007_0.jpg
I like the fact that they used the occasion for 'Repell Air Craft' instruction. ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Slyder2674 on April 29, 2011, 03:51:47 am
Hi all, brand new to the site here and loving it so far.
Came across a few pretty cool entries tonight for the HMS Curlew - 15th (or so) of March 1921.
While in port at Hong Kong "HE (His Excellency?) governor and HIH (His Imperial Highness?) Crown Prince of Japan came aboard.

It happened again a few days later with a Japanese "Admiral and officers".

Thought that was pretty cool.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on April 29, 2011, 04:21:17 am
Welcome to the forum and Old Weather!

We do have some interesting ships. :)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on April 29, 2011, 01:51:32 pm
Bit of a problem with starboard engine after a long boring refit.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-53215/ADM%2053-53215-013_1.jpg

HMS Odin finally goes out to sea for steaming trials. She goes into Suez Bay and starts to work engines up to full speed then.

"11.20 Stopped stbd engine owing to HP cylinder joint cover blowing out."

Then after a couple of hours presumably looking at it and sucking teeth they turn round and head back to port.

There then seems to be what may be a case of mistaken identity. While anchored outside the dock entrance a motor lighter comes alongside with ammunition intended for HMS Clio, which is a sister ship of Odin.

Here is your ammunition, oops wrong ship!!

Then back into dock. More dull time in Port Ibrahim with Lieut Ditto ahead. Whoopee.

I like the little final comment. "Total dist = 46 miles." Not v impressive really especially as half of that was presumably on one engine.

K
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on April 29, 2011, 06:54:00 pm
Partial eclipse of the Sun. New York 8th June 1918

HMS Coronado
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-38733/ADM%2053-38733-007_0.jpg

6.32 Partial eclipse of sun commenced 8.16 End of partial eclipse.

K
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on April 29, 2011, 07:09:15 pm
Here we go again:

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-77628/ADM%2053-77628-0017_0.jpg

And it gets worse!  :o

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-77628/ADM%2053-77628-0017_1.jpg

Yikes!  They still have to clean the upper decks  ;D -

Kathy W.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on April 29, 2011, 07:19:16 pm
On the second day at 8.45am are the hands really 'employed in thin parts of ship'?  It's all I can make it read, but I have a horrible feeling this might be a mondegreen!
I'm pretty surprised anyone wanted their supper the night before either ...

Helen J
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on April 29, 2011, 07:28:42 pm
What an Atlantic Convoy Escort is for.


The log of HMS Coronado from 15 Oct 1918
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-38737/ADM%2053-38737-010_1.jpg

I wont post in the whole transcription, but she is escorting a convoy when she receives an SOS from SS Messina which is being attacked by a submarine. She goes to assistance, spots the submarine and opens fire with forward guns and howitzer.

She clearly doesnt fire in anger very often as the firing breaks her Barometer.

Submarine dives and the rest of the convoy scatters, hopefully to safety in the heavy weather.

K

I suspect that I may owe an apology to the hard working crew of the Coronado, who have probably been working on her for months then I come along and do a few pages to help to finish her off and come up lucky with the action. Sorry.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on April 29, 2011, 07:40:12 pm
That is a mondegreen - the crew is employed in their parts of ship.

 ;D

Kathy W.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on April 30, 2011, 03:01:32 am
Bad day upstream of Basra:
"Vessels captured during action: HM Gunboat Firefly, HM Armed Launch Sumana, Turkish river steamer Basra, Turkish river tug Pioneer, Several steel lighters. "

A case of the Turks getting their own back, with interest.

Nope. I got it wrong.
Firefly & Sumana were re-captured. The others were captured.

Following day:
"7.00 proc'd down river
7.15 Made fast alongside Turkish steamer Busra & took off British troops & wounded Indian troops. "
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on April 30, 2011, 04:10:31 am
On the second day at 8.45am are the hands really 'employed in thin parts of ship'?  It's all I can make it read, but I have a horrible feeling this might be a mondegreen!
I'm pretty surprised anyone wanted their supper the night before either ...

Helen J

I think it's "their" parts of ship.  It must be a bad storm, if they are NOT employed "as requisite"!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on April 30, 2011, 09:30:22 am
Bad day upstream of Basra:
"Vessels captured during action: HM Gunboat Firefly, HM Armed Launch Sumana, Turkish river steamer Basra, Turkish river tug Pioneer, Several steel lighters. "

A case of the Turks getting their own back, with interest.

Nope. I got it wrong.
Firefly & Sumana were re-captured. The others were captured.

Following day:
"7.00 proc'd down river
7.15 Made fast alongside Turkish steamer Busra & took off British troops & wounded Indian troops. "

Hi Bunts.

This all sounds very familiar. Which ship are you on?
K
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on April 30, 2011, 02:55:58 pm
Hi, K,

Which ship are you on?  

I'm on a temp'y commission to HMS Mantis on a leisurely river cruise surrounded by a swarm of insects. The river level (Tigris) has recently risen and fallen by about 4 feet and we found a mud bank to settle on; not intentionally.

B
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on April 30, 2011, 08:14:36 pm
Thanks Bunts.

I wish I had realised that Mantis was one of the gunboats involved in the Mesopotamia campaign. I have transcribed so much of the preceding battles from Odin, Clio and Espiegle's logs. Also transcribed loads of time with them sitting at Basra with these gunboats and their support vessels, hospital ships etc going up and down as the conflict moved North.

I just dont remember Mantis being among them.

The Cadmus sloops couldnt go further because of their 11 to 12 foot draught.

Arent the list of "fly" gunboats amazing? I find it even more surprising that they were all put together and launched in Abadan, south of Basra on the Shatt al Arab, from kits sent out from England. Some of their officers and crews came from the Cadmus sloops.

May I join you on Mantis for a stretch?

K

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on May 01, 2011, 03:04:45 am
Following recent deaths in action, the deceased's possessions were sold off:

"6.30 Effects of late PO Saunders & H. Wills armourer's crew sold by auction. Money collected was: Saunders (GBP)18.13s 0d; Wills (GBP)26.0s 0d. "

I have no idea of a conversion rate to today's value but 18 GBP would certainly be several week's pay.

An acquaintance recently told me of a similar event which occurred following the death of a member of his troop in Afghanistan. I don't know the total raised but it was certainly not a fire sale; a single bootlace fetched 20 GBP.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on May 02, 2011, 09:13:24 am
Two officers are in trouble for trying to start a kind of mini-mutiny among the engineers of the Suva:
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-61879/ADM%2053-61879-005_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Randi on May 02, 2011, 11:18:16 am

An acquaintance recently told me of a similar event which occurred following the death of a member of his troop in Afghanistan. I don't know the total raised but it was certainly not a fire sale; a single bootlace fetched 20 GBP.

I'm glad to know that the tradition has been continued. To know that he was valued by his teammates must be a comfort to his family.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on May 02, 2011, 11:20:28 pm
Two officers are in trouble for trying to start a kind of mini-mutiny among the engineers of the Suva:
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-61879/ADM%2053-61879-005_1.jpg

Yes, quite riveting indeed!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: LupusUK on May 03, 2011, 08:02:59 pm
Oh dear, Lieutenant Barnes reprimanded twice in one day!

Reprimanded Lieutenant George Edwin Olaf Barnes R.N. for slackness in performing his duty, in relieving the deck, as officer of the middle watch twenty minutes late

and

Reprimanded Lieutenant George Edwin Olaf Barnes for acting to the prejudice of [?] order and naval discipline, in striking a subordinate officer, and saying to him "Don't tell me lies".

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-45728/ADM%2053-45728-017_0.jpg

Can anyone help with the missing word. It looks like gord (the initial letter looks the same as the g in George to me) but that doesn't make sense. Not doubt it will be something blindingly obvious ;D

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on May 03, 2011, 08:06:23 pm
Good Order and naval discipline -

Kathy W.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: LupusUK on May 03, 2011, 08:19:34 pm
Good Order and naval discipline -

Kathy W.

Thanks Kathy.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Jeff on May 04, 2011, 04:21:28 am
Cyzaki,

In the US Merchant Marine there is an "Official Log", separate from the deck log, of legal records required to be kept by the US Coast Guard and other agencies. Reprimanding a crew member for an offence like falling asleep on watch would be one of these entries, and he would be required to sign the entry to show that he was aware of the entry being made and any punishment. This is probably the model being followed here.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mutabilitie on May 04, 2011, 09:21:42 am
I suspect, though, that in some cases, one of the reasons for noting those things down in the main log must have been to embarrass the people concerned, like in the case of the Glaswegian ladies of the night who were 'clandestinely' brought on board the Patia by two junior officers.;) The engineers' mini-mutiny which I posted about earlier might fall into that category as well. I meant to post a transcription as well, but I seem to have forgotten, so here it is:
Had occasion to find fault with Engr. Lieut. Commdr. Rowe RNR for entering the Engineer Commanders Cabin at 2.0 am on morning of Jan. 4th, behaving in an improper manner and using abusive language towards him. Also for neglect of duty in allowing junior engineer officers to collect at an improper time and place in order to express discontent with an order issued by the Engineer Commander. [Signed: William H. D. Boyle Captain] Read by me O.R. Rowe.
and
Had occasion to find fault with Engr. Sub. Lt. H.C. Taylor (Tempy) RNR for having taken a leading part at an improper assembly of Engineers Officers wishing to express discontent with an order issued by the Engineer Commander. [Signed: William H.D. Boyle Captain] Read by me. H.C. Taylor
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-61879/ADM%2053-61879-005_1.jpg
At first sight I thought one of the officers at fault was my navigating officer, because he's called Taylor as well, but it wasn't him after all.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on May 04, 2011, 10:59:20 am
The Admiralty site (http://www.nmm.ac.uk/collections/archive/catalogue/record.cfm?ID=ADM%2FL) lists 2 kinds of logs from each ship.

?ADM51: Admiralty: Captains' Logs, 1669-1853
?ADM53: Admiralty: and Ministry of Defence, Navy Department: Ships' Logs 1799-1985

We are transcribing the Ships' Logs (aka Lieutenants' logs) simply because those are the ones with all the weather data.  I don't doubt that all the really interested discipline incidents, and other fascinating writings, are in the Captain's logs.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on May 04, 2011, 05:57:57 pm
Wierd entry from HMS Odin, somewhere in the Red Sea in April 1918.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-53218/ADM%2053-53218-013_0.jpg

The Kamaran Launch brings a dhow alongside for unloading, then Odin proceeds, opens fire on the/a dhow with both 3 pdr guns then rams it.

It isn't clear whether it is the one that they unloaded that gets the treatment, but I assume not as there is a two hour gap.

No indication of what happened to the dhow's crew, why there was a problem with this particular dhow, no indication of a challenge or warning shot, just fired at it then rammed it.
 
K
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on May 04, 2011, 06:10:31 pm
It isn't clear whether it is the one that they unloaded that gets the treatment, but I assume not as there is a two hour gap.

My guess is that it's the same one. 1 hour 40 minutes to unload it, close up (!) the guns' crews, move away; seems about right.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on May 04, 2011, 06:14:17 pm
I guess we will never know for sure.

If it was the one they bought alongside and unloaded it is more likely that there was no crew which would be a good thing.

Either way, assuming they sunk it, it is the third dhow one of my ships has sunk in over 3000 pages predominantly of Cadmus class sloops. They just leave devastation in their wake wherever they go!!!

K
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on May 07, 2011, 06:36:25 pm
After chocolate and sugar here comes Beef, quite a recipe.  ;D

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-36152/ADM%2053-36152-004_0.jpg

At 3.15 Discharged one Rating T.S.

This T.S. could mean To Shore.

And the next day:

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-36152/ADM%2053-36152-004_1.jpg

I hope that the harbour was not too polluted.  :-\
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Randi on May 07, 2011, 07:24:51 pm
YECH!!!  :P
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on May 07, 2011, 07:31:50 pm
You could not have said it better.  ;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on May 07, 2011, 07:55:55 pm
Suffolk lost the race  :(

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-69760/ADM%2053-69760-077_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on May 07, 2011, 08:14:05 pm
Cheer up you'll win next time  ;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: tastiger on May 14, 2011, 05:58:04 pm
Suffolk lost the race  :(

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-69760/ADM%2053-69760-077_0.jpg

Huh. I'm the captain of that ship and I missed that :-[ (I went back and fixed it). Here's an entry over a year later about a hurricane!
 http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-61607/ADM%2053-61607-005_0.jpg
I looked it up, it was roughly a category 3 when it hit Bermuda.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries - Armistice Remembrance
Post by: Lancsgreybeard on May 15, 2011, 08:37:27 am
From the log of "Cadmus" at Wei hai Wei, 11 November, 1919

11.0 Fired time gun, 11.02 Fired time gun in commemoration of Armistice Day

lgb
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Thursday Next on May 15, 2011, 09:26:07 pm
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-67574/ADM%2053-67574-023_1.jpg

From the logs of the Vindictive, a heroic rescue by Lt Sayle.  (Yes, of course it's the bit with the teeny tiny writing! But it is pretty clear once you apply sufficient magnification.)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on May 15, 2011, 09:43:51 pm
Sometimes after being on sea for nearly two months, you get a reward:

Two pleasant mornings in Rio Janeiro  :D

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-36156/ADM%2053-36156-015_0.jpg

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-36156/ADM%2053-36156-015_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: ElisabethB on May 15, 2011, 10:49:55 pm
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-67574/ADM%2053-67574-023_1.jpg

From the logs of the Vindictive, a heroic rescue by Lt Sayle.  (Yes, of course it's the bit with the teeny tiny writing! But it is pretty clear once you apply sufficient magnification.)
Three cheers for Lt Sayle !  :D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on May 15, 2011, 11:25:37 pm
Sometimes after being on sea for nearly two months, you get a reward:

Two pleasant mornings in Rio Janeiro  :D

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-36156/ADM%2053-36156-015_0.jpg

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-36156/ADM%2053-36156-015_1.jpg

Agree with ElisabethB--I have a wonderful image of Lt Sayle doing a perfect dive off the side of the ship, rescuing the hapless G Neal! :o Bravo, Lt. Sayle!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on May 15, 2011, 11:30:53 pm
Hard to believe, but true.
Original posting and two replies and not one comment about the Good Lt.'s surname.  :-\
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: ElisabethB on May 15, 2011, 11:44:03 pm
We were waiting for you Bunts !  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on May 16, 2011, 12:21:31 am
We were waiting for you Bunts !  ;D


Ah. You subscribe to the "Age before Beauty" principle.
Thank you, Young Lady.
 :-*
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: montanaisaleg on May 16, 2011, 04:08:39 pm
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-47715/ADM%2053-47715-014_0.jpg

The comet over Brazil again (HMS Macedonia, first AM entry): "0.30 Observed high light probably on shore bearing N50.5W (True)"

Then around 6:30pm: "Observed a flare light bearing N2W (True)"
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on May 16, 2011, 04:22:55 pm
What pretty handwriting your logkeeper has!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: montanaisaleg on May 16, 2011, 05:29:59 pm
Macedonia is blessed with almost all logkeepers (so far) having good handwriting.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Jeff on May 18, 2011, 06:52:41 am
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-72182/ADM%2053-72182-144_0.jpg

"Divers endeavouring to recover opium." This entry is on two consecutive pages with no other reference. We don't know where it came from or if they did recover it.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: montanaisaleg on May 18, 2011, 03:25:17 pm
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-47717/ADM%2053-47717-003_1.jpg

Rough day at sea:
"10.40 Seaman McKenzie placed under close arrest.
...
3.0 Shipwright Thompson placed under open arrest."
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: montanaisaleg on May 19, 2011, 05:04:14 pm
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-47718/ADM%2053-47718-004_0.jpg

Feb 2 1917, HMS Macedonia.  Worst day of storms I've seen.  First I've seen weather described as "fierce squalls."

Next day things slowed down:
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-47718/ADM%2053-47718-004_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on May 21, 2011, 08:33:34 am
Using a free railway pass when not entitled to it is evidently a bad thing:

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-33656/ADM53-33656-006_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on May 21, 2011, 08:39:56 am
If it took them until the 6th Oct. to find the crime he committed on July25th, he must have truly believed he got away with it!  I wonder which accountant or auditor was so obsessive-compulsive about picking nits to trace a two-and-a-half month old train ride to a young acting sub-lieutenant?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on May 21, 2011, 08:46:41 am
Well, we've got a prisoner at large now!

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-33656/ADM53-33656-010_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on May 22, 2011, 11:04:22 am
A tale of two or three dhows.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-61876/ADM%2053-61876-005_1.jpg

I wont transcribe it all but Suva tries to tow two dhows and one sinks, losing some weapons in the process. Crew are picked up by another dhow which has a prize crew aboard. Suva then takes that one (or another one) in tow and that nearly sinks and breaks adrift. Then they lose it in the dark and then find it again.

Exeunt stage S30E 30 revs with dhow in tow.

Act 2 The following day
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-61876/ADM%2053-61876-006_0.jpg

The dhow submerges again so they cast it adrift!!

Dhow exeunts downwards.

Another literary masterpiece from Suva's log keeper.

Enjoy 
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on May 22, 2011, 01:36:48 pm
Short tornado and torrential rain:

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-34354/ADM53-34354-191_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on May 23, 2011, 08:18:48 pm
I would have just parked it and gone to the movies (or a bar  ;) ):

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-77629/ADM%2053-77629-0102_0.jpg

Kathy W.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on May 23, 2011, 10:25:20 pm
I would have just parked it and gone to the movies (or a bar  ;) ):

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-77629/ADM%2053-77629-0102_0.jpg

Kathy W.


Miss, Miss! Please Miss!

It's that Mantis' fault. She's been dropping litter:

"Re: If you find letters or other misc in the logbooks...
? Reply #219 on: Today at 09:46:45 PM ?

    * Quote

Two halves of a curious little note from HMS Mantis. 1917 in the Tigris near Baghdad

She has recently been aground so I guess this is the report of the loss of a cable that parted during the recovery, but that isnt recorded in the logs I have transcribed.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-48256/ADM%2053-48256-050_0.jpg
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-48256/ADM%2053-48256-050_1.jpg

K
? Last Edit: Today at 09:50:51 PM by Tegwen ? "

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on May 23, 2011, 10:30:45 pm
I dearly wish folks would clean up after themselves!

 ;D

Kathy W.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on May 23, 2011, 10:42:34 pm
WHAT???
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on May 23, 2011, 11:52:21 pm
I feel some research coming on:
 ???

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-77629/ADM%2053-77629-0148_1.jpg

Kathy W.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on May 24, 2011, 12:07:51 am
I see you got one o' them thar new fangled 24 hour clocks.

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: bpb42 on May 24, 2011, 07:12:08 pm
Suffolk lost the race  :(

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-69760/ADM%2053-69760-077_0.jpg

Huh. I'm the captain of that ship and I missed that :-[ (I went back and fixed it). Here's an entry over a year later about a hurricane!
 http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-61607/ADM%2053-61607-005_0.jpg
I looked it up, it was roughly a category 3 when it hit Bermuda.
Hi
looking at that page again, I wonder if the observations, at 1.40 & 9am, about a floating dock coming adrift actually refers to the floating dry dock the Navy had stationed in Bermuda.It was a massive structure
and the last thing you would want shooting around in a storm.If it was, they must have got it back under control  as several of the OW ships use it later in the war.
Just a thought.
http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=Md8DAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA592&lpg=PA592&dq=floating
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on May 25, 2011, 01:40:33 pm
HMS Ribble, Gallipoli, May 1915

"5.50 Secured alongside Hindukush.
Drew spars for kite.
Submarine E14 arrived from the sea of Marmara & was loudly cheered by all ships. Capt. has been awarded V.C. & the crew D.C.M.s.
6.10 Shoved off from Hindukush.
6.15 Half masted colours. Amethyst left harbour with burial party."

It's all there, isn't it; from the mundane to ...


http://www.gosportsubmariners.com/VCs.htm
"The next submariner to be awarded the VC was Lieutenant-Commander Edward Boyle who took the submarine E14 through the Dardanelles in April 1915 and into the Sea of Marmara where he joined the Australian submarine AE2 commanded by Irish born Lieutenant-Commander Hew Stoker to attack the Turkish Navy ships based in the area. Unfortunately the AE2 was damaged by a Turkish torpedo boat soon after and the crew of British and Australians was forced to surrender to the Turks. Boyle, however, remained in the Sea of Marmara for two weeks sinking three ships and causing panic among the enemy naval forces there."
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on May 25, 2011, 04:02:51 pm
HMS Ribble, Gallipoli, May 1915

"7.30 periscope sighted off C. Helles 
8.50 Harpy reported sighting periscope coming N.
10.15 Vengeance reported sighted submarine. Action stations.
11.0 proc'd for Gaba Tepe
0.5 Canopus flying Sub. signal
0.30 Rec'd orders to close Triumph, proc'd full speed
0.26 Triumph sank
0.50 Stopped & assisted search for survivors
1.45 proc'd with Grampus on search for submarine
2.45 Obs'd shots falling near tug Kesaonos - closed her at full speed. She reported she had seen submarine & was firing at it with rifles. Went full speed over spot indicated. No submarine seen. "

(0.30 & 0.26 as in the log)

"Three officers and 75 ratings died in the sinking of Triumph"
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Triumph_(1903)

The submarine was U21 responsible for sinking 40 allied ships. It's skipper was Otto Hersing; after the war he went into potato farming.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SM_U-21_(Germany)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on May 25, 2011, 06:10:22 pm
Two days later 27th May 1915:

"HMS Majestic struck by torpedo from hostile submarine off C. Helles and sank "

U21 again.

49 of the crew were lost. Her upturned hull, supported by the foremast, remained visible above the sea until 17th November 1915, when a storm caused it to collapse.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Majestic_(1895)

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: bpb42 on May 25, 2011, 08:08:36 pm
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-40808/0055_1.jpg

HMS The Empress of Britain, moored at Sierra Leone on the 26th November, 1914
records, at 7pm,
                       'Light tornado passed over ship'

with wind & weather readings for 7pm entered as 'SSE 7 BCL.'
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on May 26, 2011, 01:17:04 pm
HMS Ribble, Malta, 30 June 1915.

Having left the hazards at Gallipoli for relative safety:

"10.15 Explosion occurred in Torpedo Lecture Room. Sent Fire party to scene of disaster"

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on May 26, 2011, 02:33:29 pm
Boy, there is some irony there -

Kathy W.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: ElisabethB on May 26, 2011, 06:12:02 pm
Really !  ;) ;D ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Jeff on May 26, 2011, 07:57:12 pm
Good news! The British have forgiven us for the Revolution! HMS Cairo dresses ship in honour of George Washington's birthday.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-72182/ADM%2053-72182-078_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Caro on May 27, 2011, 08:46:19 pm
Avoca observes a total eclipse of the moon, December 28, 1917, off Peru.  8) 8) 8)
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-34562/ADM%2053-34562-017_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: montanaisaleg on May 27, 2011, 08:55:11 pm
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-47722/ADM%2053-47722-013_0.jpg

Macedonia, 20 June 1917

The most interesting thing to happen in a year or more, and it happens while they're in dry dock.

"10.30 PO Allington + crew of pinnace returned + reported pinnace sunk by tug Ligaro."

Left side of the page
"The following paymasters stores were lost by sinking of the steam pinnace:
4 complete something suits (combination)
8 South Westers  1 something jacket
1 PR something trousers

The following naval stores were lost by the sinking of the steam pinnace:
Boat's compass Juliano Patt no 191
Ensign White 4 breadth
Brato Pendant 4 yds
1 Globe L~~
Rigging chain used for anchor
chain 17 fathoms 5/16"

The "something" might be "Orlokin."

Any info on what some of the other items are?  "Ensign White 4 breadth," "Brato Pendant 4 yds," and "1 Globe L~~", specifically.

Travis
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on May 27, 2011, 09:27:27 pm
Quote
4 complete something Oilskins suits (combination)
8 South Westers  1 something Oilskin jacket
1 PR something Oilskin trousers
...
1 Globe Lamp

The "Ensign White 4 breadth" is the white ensign flown by all RN ships, labeling themselves as British, and the 4 breadth is its size - Bunting Tosser explained this (http://forum.oldweather.org/index.php?topic=1454.msg17130#msg17130) to us a while back.


Pendants were also discussed and defined awhile back.  (I love our search function when I remember things, but not when and where I saw them! :) )  Dorbel defined this (http://forum.oldweather.org/index.php?topic=1100.msg10419#msg10419) for us and why they would give the length of it. 

I could find absolutely no reference to "Brato", although my googling turned up a very interesting reference link to signal flags and what they mean (http://mysite.verizon.net/vzeohzt4/Seaflags/signals/Signals.html).  Maybe one of OW's naval experts can carry it further.

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: montanaisaleg on May 27, 2011, 09:42:57 pm
"Oilskin" indeed.  Thanks for all the info!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on May 29, 2011, 06:31:07 pm
Challenger has just been involved with sundry other ships in the surrender of Dar es Salaam - a morning full of incident.  Then in the afternoon - Sent to HMS Trent for beach party.  What on earth were they up to?

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-37520/ADM53-37520-0094_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on May 29, 2011, 08:55:36 pm
Hi Helenj

It is nice to know that you are on board of Challenger.

I remember the surrender of Dar es Salaam but not that "beach party".

Sorry for not having a clue, only a guess witch is that they were up to search the beaches for any artifacts or hidden enemies.  :-\

Something different: On board HMS Bristol a Children's Party was held  :D

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-36163/ADM%2053-36163-016_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: studentforever on May 29, 2011, 09:12:20 pm
Glad you are enjoying Challenger. I can remember a couple of fishing parties as well as the occasional football party.  I too found some of the logs incongruous - lots of action in the morning then something banal like 'aired bedding' in the afternoon. I think routine was everything in the Navy and only something really serious, like a spot of bombarding shore positions, was allowed to interrupt.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on May 30, 2011, 12:21:23 pm
Getting a few days on in the logs it seems the beach party might have been more to do with searching or guarding the beach than enjoying it - a shame for the hard working sailors! 
I'm sure the routines are very important - and personally I would still want to air my bedding even if I had been involved in a battle in the morning.  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: LupusUK on May 30, 2011, 03:52:29 pm
HMS Lancaster 17th September 1914, off New York
2am entry:-
A comet visible bearing NE
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-46000/ADM%2053-46000-011_0.jpg

I can't be sure but this looks like a likely candidate:-
http://articles.adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/t2png?bg=%23FFFFFF&/seri/PA.../0022/600/0000500.000&db_key=AST&bits=4&res=100&filetype=.gif
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: LupusUK on May 30, 2011, 05:44:32 pm
HMS Lancaster 18th September 1914 off New York

Stopped and boarded S.S. Commewijne and removed 27 Germans as prisoners of war
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-46000/ADM%2053-46000-011_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on May 31, 2011, 02:19:31 am
HMS Ribble, Mudros Dec. 1915, during the Gallipoli campaign. 

"4.30 Discharged 2 Sto. Ratings to Blenheim for confirmation"

To paraphrase an old saying "There are no atheists in an engine room"?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries - Any suggestions?
Post by: Lancsgreybeard on May 31, 2011, 01:35:33 pm
12 August, 1914 - Cadmus is somewhere NE of Hong Kong and is accosted:

"C.M.S. "Hsin Chang" closed and asked for information re Hong Kong"

Possibly "Know any good fish and chip shops?"

lgb

or "Do you know where Eccles does the dance of the seven army surplus blankets?"
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: portanucis on June 03, 2011, 06:49:12 pm
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-46003/ADM%2053-46003-007_1.jpg

The loss of these  4 paint brushes (!) must have been a real point of concern for the captain of the Lancaster.

Portanucis
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Randi on June 03, 2011, 07:00:30 pm
I'd suspect sabotage ;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: DJ_59 on June 04, 2011, 01:11:37 am

Even aboard ship everybody's an art critic.

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Lancsgreybeard on June 05, 2011, 01:52:43 pm

Even aboard ship everybody's an art critic.

No just another white-wash job

lgb
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on June 05, 2011, 05:54:23 pm
yet another thread that proves my theory about the true purpose of this project!

 :P

Kathy W.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on June 08, 2011, 08:11:55 pm
Food has been lost but something was missing: Dishes.

Here they come  ;D

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-36164/ADM%2053-36164-051_0.jpg

Well, I agree there is only one but it is a beginning for a whole set.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on June 11, 2011, 02:13:26 am
HMS Ribble (June 1917)
The voyage got off to delayed start when we clattered a steam barge in port. Since then we've had a warehouseful of equipment lost/washed overboard, failures in engineering equipment and coaling machinery; but here's a chance to shine.

"2.0(pm) Rec'd SOS signal from Japanese destroyer Sakaki in Lat 36 10N Long 23 51E proceeded at once to her assistance.
3.0 arrived found Sakaki torpedoed  & Maku screening her. Sent boats to Sakaki for wounded. Passed towing wire
3.10 Sakaki in tow stern first
3.25 French destroyer arrived Got wounded aboard & hoisted boats. Set co SSE for Suda Bay
3.35 Jed joined escort
4.0 Partridge II joined escort
4.35 Jed proc'd to escort Osmanieh
6.15 Partridge II proc'd to Suda to report arrival
6.30 Gazelle joined escort
7.15 Increased to 150 revs
8.5 Towing wire parted
8.30 Secured Sakaki's wires, proceeded
11.23 passed boom. Bow shut grating, 1 15ft oar, 3 crutches lost from whaler. 1 brass crutch lost from berthon boat when nearly swamped by wash of H.I.J.M.S. Mat~~
0.20(am) Anchored
0.40 Tug John Payne went alongside Sakaki & towed her to Dalhousie
1.0 Hospital boat came alongside for wounded
1.35 Pipe down" 

Not Tracey Island & International Rescue standard, but impressive until spoiled by a dozy allied vessel.  >:(
"Did anyone get the number of that truck?"
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on June 12, 2011, 02:55:04 am
HMS Ribble 24th June 1917 about 100 miles off Mudros.

9.30 Cestrian torpedoed in starboard side of boiler room.
9.38 went alongside starboard side of Cestrian Took 750 troops aboard
9.40, 9.52, 9.57 fired at objects believed to be submarine
10. Let go from Cestrian course & speed for signalling Racoon. Sent dinghy to pick up survivors
10.25 ceased fire set co. N60W 20 knots 10.40 a/c N4W 22 kts

2.40 Sent troops ashore in motor lighters
3.25 sent 1 wounded officer & 1 man to Rewa Sent 9 officers & 10 men of Cestrian to N.T.O.

*********************************

http://www.wrecksite.eu/wreck.aspx?145498
10/08/2010
On June 24th, 1917, the British troopship Cestrian, on a voyage from Salonica to Alexandria with 800 troops and horses, was sunk by the German submarine UB-42 (Kurt Schwarz), 4 miles SE of Skyros Island, Aegean Sea. 3 crew members were killed. Splendid discipline among the embarked troops was the sole reason that none were lost.

*************************************

I resisted the temptation to put this encouraging footnote in the transcription.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: tastiger on June 13, 2011, 06:17:16 pm
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-74434/ADM%2053-74434-0020_0.jpg
Noon: Columbo fired 21 ~ in honour of declaration of American Independence.
Not sure what major event they are referring to, though...
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on June 13, 2011, 06:47:33 pm
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-74434/ADM%2053-74434-0020_0.jpg
Noon: Columbo fired 21 ~ in honour of declaration of American Independence.
Not sure what major event they are referring to, though...


That is, of course "21 gun salute".
Noisy day. In the forenoon HMS Colombo fired 15 gun salute for a Japanese ship. Oops 14 GS before that and another 15 later.
The shape of things to come.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Randi on June 16, 2011, 07:48:41 pm
2/45 Sighted object in water.

Stand by for next thrilling installment ::)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Randi on June 16, 2011, 08:31:12 pm
3/12  Object a dead whale  resumed course.

3/40  Sighted another dead whale.


HMS Avoca 9 June 1917
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: ElisabethB on June 16, 2011, 09:39:39 pm
 :o ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: jdulak on June 16, 2011, 11:19:59 pm
HMS Orama 19 October 1917 - Sunk

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-53484/ADM%2053-53484-011_1.jpg

Interestingly the previous day (Oct 18) the crew had practiced "Abandon Ship" stations.

John Dulak
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Randi on June 16, 2011, 11:32:48 pm
HMS Orama 19 October 1917 - Sunk

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-53484/ADM%2053-53484-011_1.jpg

Interestingly the previous day (Oct 18) the crew had practiced "Abandon Ship" stations.

John Dulak
Almost creepy. I wonder how often they practiced the drill.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on June 17, 2011, 01:23:57 am
HMS Orama 19 October 1917 - Sunk

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-53484/ADM%2053-53484-011_1.jpg

Interestingly the previous day (Oct 18) the crew had practiced "Abandon Ship" stations.

John Dulak
Almost creepy. I wonder how often they practiced the drill.


"Practice makes perfect".
There is no mention of casualties, and the time taken for her to sink obviously allowed for a fairly orderly departure e.g. taking the log book(s). On the face of it, the captain was the last to leave.
It's a combination of bad luck, I suppose with destroyers being detached for other duties.

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on June 18, 2011, 04:42:10 pm
HMS Ribble. Mediterranean 1917

The skipper has just returned from 3 weeks leave in Blighty, and what happens?
(No, his name is not Jonah.)

"The following gear lost overboard on 18th, 19th & 20th Nov. owing to heavy weather:
B11. drums steel, 25 gals - 5;
K Drum broeburn oil 25 gals-1;
B10.2 cans tin oil 1 gal-1;
B8 Hoses wash deck canvas 40ft- 2;
B9.78E Hook brass, boat, gun metal large- 1;
Ward Room meat safe,
stern light,
1 leg of after torpedo tray,
2 canvas covers for ammunition boxes,
2 ward room ventilator covers.
The following gear damaged by heavy seas on 18th, 19th, & 20th Nov:
Port after stokehold ventilator cowl,
shell rack & lumber rack port side.
Screens round chart house & round foremost gun platform carried away & stanchions of latter damaged.
Berthon boat;
cover for berthon boat & for port & starboard bins & shell racks.
Cover for sweep wire drum. Canvas screens for port & starboard sponsons 
Sounding machine carried away.
Leads for night sights & loading lights of all guns, leads for bridge searchlight & chartroom lights, all engine room & stokeholds' leads.
Damage sustained in No. 6 Mess: 6 sections of lockers, 2 tables, 2 benches broken, one jar sulphuric acid broken.
Bolts torn from deck on starbd side rendering Provision room leaky thereby damaging the following stores - tea 5lbs, Peas 60lbs, split peas 10lbs, flour 110lbs, cocoa 15lbs "
 
Sulphuric acid in the Mess ??? Didn't they have vinegar for their chips (French fries)?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Randi on June 18, 2011, 05:37:30 pm
Sounding machine carried away.

That's the third one lost?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on June 18, 2011, 10:50:35 pm
Sounding machine carried away.

That's the third one lost?

Correct; in about 7 months.
Good Grief, someone actually reads this stuff.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on June 19, 2011, 02:51:44 am
That's alright, when I was on survey ship Endeavour, we lost 3 anchors in less than 2 weeks.  Each reported as "lost overboard" - which really  baffled me at first, I thought they were supposed to throw the things overboard! ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: montanaisaleg on June 20, 2011, 04:38:24 pm
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-47738/ADM%2053-47738-011_1.jpg

Macedonia, 17th September 1918
6:45am: "Sighted derelict life boat a/c to examine her.  7.00 Lowered pt cutter.  7.15 1st Cutter returned with lifeboat, salv'ed gear.  7.45 Commenced firing on boat."

The list of rounds fired seems excessive for a measly life boat:
"17 rounds BL 6" full charge
16 rounds QF 6" full charge
4 bomb shell from 11" howitzer
10 steel shell from 6 pr QF"

Then later on the same day:
"2.48 Sighted suspicious object; presumed to be submarine's periscope.  A/c with port helm towards it.  Dropped port depth charge type "D"."

Then that's it.

I wonder if the derelict life boat was some sort of a trick by the (presumed) submarine to lure ships in.  The 7 hours between sighting the life boat and sighting the (presumed) sub might argue against that, but who knows..
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Randi on June 20, 2011, 06:32:31 pm
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-47738/ADM%2053-47738-011_1.jpg

Macedonia, 17th September 1918
6:45am: "Sighted derelict life boat a/c to examine her.  7.00 Lowered pt cutter.  7.15 1st Cutter returned with lifeboat, salv'ed gear.  7.45 Commenced firing on boat."

The list of rounds fired seems excessive for a measly life boat:
"17 rounds BL 6" full charge
16 rounds QF 6" full charge
4 bomb shell from 11" howitzer
10 steel shell from 6 pr QF"

Then later on the same day:
"2.48 Sighted suspicious object; presumed to be submarine's periscope.  A/c with port helm towards it.  Dropped port depth charge type "D"."

Then that's it.

I wonder if the derelict life boat was some sort of a trick by the (presumed) submarine to lure ships in.  The 7 hours between sighting the life boat and sighting the (presumed) sub might argue against that, but who knows..

Maybe they were lousy shots  ;D
I would think that at least after - 4 bomb shell from 11" howitzer - there would no longer be a target!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: montanaisaleg on June 20, 2011, 06:37:44 pm
47 rounds to sink a life boat.  I don't know what counted as good accuracy for WWI ships, but 47 shots to destroy a mostly stationary target doesn't sound very good.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on June 20, 2011, 07:06:12 pm
47 rounds to sink a life boat.  I don't know what counted as good accuracy for WWI ships, but 47 shots to destroy a mostly stationary target doesn't sound very good.

Don't forget it was a lifeboat. I've read/heard/seen film of sailors taking hammers and saws to dispose of them.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: DJ_59 on June 20, 2011, 11:06:21 pm

You'd think a lifeboat could be scuttled without wasting all that ammo.  Or taken aboard and dismantled.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on June 21, 2011, 12:43:29 am

You'd think a lifeboat could be scuttled without wasting all that ammo.  Or taken aboard and dismantled.


Well ... the idea is that they are buoyant even when full of water. They're perhaps not "heavy" enough to explode a shell - it could punch straight through. So, until all the buoyancy compartments are punctured & flooded it will still float, after a fashion. I believe this would have been known to the skipper and he was using it for target practice, hence the assortment of munitions.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on June 21, 2011, 09:07:22 am
The best way to sink a lifeboat with 47 shells would be to row over and put them all in it!!!!

K
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on June 22, 2011, 10:02:04 pm
HMS Odin saves two lost airmen.

She is in the Red Sea in 1920 and has spent two days up and down the coast searching for a lost aircraft from the first aircraft carrier HMS Ark Royal.

Then this page. http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-53229/ADM%2053-53229-080_0.jpg

She spots "Verys Lights" and sends a boat to pick up the two RAE Lieutenants.

K
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on June 22, 2011, 11:21:55 pm
HMS Ribble 3rd June 1918 Gibraltar to Malta

"8.06 SS Glaucus port leading wing ship torpedoed
Zigzagged ahead wing to wing of convoy.
Wallflower & Usk stood by Glaucus
9.50 Glaucus sank"

Next day:

"2.0 Half masted colours.
Chief Engineer of Glaucus buried from Wallflower.
2.30 Re-hoisted colours"

Location not given
(according to http://www.wrecksite.eu/wreck.aspx?37132 - 20 miles west of Granitola )

Next day, at Malta:

"6.23 am Embarked 29 Europeans & 111 Chinese from Wallflower, survivors of SS Glaucus
11.0 Landed survivors & sent 2 wounded to Egmont "
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on June 25, 2011, 12:48:52 am
HMS Ribble, 28th July 1918

"7.10 (pm) proc'd (from Syracuse)
7.17 waited for convoy
7.30 proc'd convoy 5 ships
8.50 SS Vesuvio torpedoed port side Sighted second torpedo passed between Ribble & Vesuvio. Sighted periscope on port bow. Attacked submarine at full speed. Dropped 4 depth charges & calcium light. Convoy returned to Syracuse. Usk dropped 2 depth charges in vicinity of calcium light and took off all survivors. Ribble & Usk patrolled danger area.
10.45 Made fast 1 wire to rudder post of Vesuvio.
Wire parted at 11.5. 
11.15 Sent Usk to intercept & divert a convoy to the SE'ard. Ribble screened Italian tugs which were taking Vesuvio in tow. "
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on June 25, 2011, 11:41:40 pm
I did not know that the Royal Navy was in Mexico during the Revolution and helping to evacuate refugees.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-69477/ADM53-69477-016_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on June 26, 2011, 02:33:37 am
The RN patroled the American coasts for most of the 10 years our logs come from.  They used Halifax, Canada, as their fueling base for the northern 2/3s of the States, and Bermuda for the US southern coasts and the Carribean. 

I started OW on Caronia, patrolling outside New York harbor in 1915 for ships wanting to ship supplies to Germany.  The rules seemed to be that they would stay far enough from our coast to be in international waters, and they never touched any US ship.  The only time they boarded an American freighter, there was a longer than usual log note stating that the ship had been flying a foreign flag and they let it go as soon as they learned its nationality. 

Avoca had a forum post, being involved somehow with with a Mexican river gunboat in 1916 related to their ongoing revolutionary war.

Lancaster was in another post, picking up Mexican refugees in 1914.  (The Mexican Revolution started in 1910 and went on seemingly forever, something like 10 years.)

The US may certainly have been a British ally, but that doesn't mean they didn't keep an eye on us the whole time.  Makes me wonder what they are doing just outside our borders right now. ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on June 26, 2011, 02:56:27 am
Makes me wonder what they are doing just outside our borders right now.

"they" and "our" could be confusing to recent joiners. Not that it matters as the sentiment is pretty much universal.  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on June 26, 2011, 03:11:05 am
OW gets confusing to us Americans here - Caronia was definitely "my" ship patroling outside "my" borders, patroling in way that I found to be a bit distrustful.  No doubt at all, as crew I was indeed on my ship - which was a foreign vessal. :-\
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on June 26, 2011, 03:40:32 am
Okaaaaaaaay...
That's much as I thought you meant
Thanks for the clarification and confirmation of my expectation.
 ???
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: DJ_59 on June 27, 2011, 06:58:33 am

Are you two talking in code, or did I just have a stroke?

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on June 27, 2011, 01:48:19 pm
I suppose that, in grammatical terms, we were employing the "continuous alternative possessive" voice. (I doubt that you'll find it in "Fowler's Modern English Usage".)
You'll be relieved to know that I've chucked in the towel.
Cancel the ambulance.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on June 28, 2011, 08:58:41 pm
Patuca, in Glasgow on 24th June 1915, at 2pm:
Geutile (not sure this is right) (Stoker) broke out of ship in plain clothes; warrant issued for his arrest.

Sounds a rather dramatic way to get out on the town ...

And (to get two for the price of one) can anyone interpret the name?

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-54673/ADM%2053-54673-015_0.jpg

By a bizarre coincidence, I've just been doing again some of these days, having got them again, in different handwriting.  And have discovered that this stoker had only signed on the day before!  Obviously thought better of it.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on June 28, 2011, 09:18:40 pm
Patuca, in Glasgow on 24th June 1915, at 2pm:
Geutile (not sure this is right) (Stoker) broke out of ship in plain clothes; warrant issued for his arrest.

Sounds a rather dramatic way to get out on the town ...

And (to get two for the price of one) can anyone interpret the name?

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-54673/ADM%2053-54673-015_0.jpg

His name is Gentile. He must have Italian ancestors.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on June 28, 2011, 09:27:15 pm
have ya'll seen A Christmas Story?  I am reminded of the major award (it said Fragile on its packing create) and the father was sure it was from Italy.  ;D ;D ;D

I love that movie!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on June 28, 2011, 09:28:54 pm
Thank you - I thought it looked like that but couldn't believe it was actually a name.  I hadn't thought of it being Italian.  I'll go back and change it.

PS He hasn't been found and we've now left Glasgow, so perhaps he's got away.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: tastiger on June 28, 2011, 10:27:26 pm
The RN patroled the American coasts for most of the 10 years our logs come from.  They used Halifax, Canada, as their fueling base for the northern 2/3s of the States, and Bermuda for the US southern coasts and the Carribean. 

I started OW on Caronia, patrolling outside New York harbor in 1915 for ships wanting to ship supplies to Germany.  The rules seemed to be that they would stay far enough from our coast to be in international waters, and they never touched any US ship.  The only time they boarded an American freighter, there was a longer than usual log note stating that the ship had been flying a foreign flag and they let it go as soon as they learned its nationality. 

Avoca had a forum post, being involved somehow with with a Mexican river gunboat in 1916 related to their ongoing revolutionary war.

Lancaster was in another post, picking up Mexican refugees in 1914.  (The Mexican Revolution started in 1910 and went on seemingly forever, something like 10 years.)

The US may certainly have been a British ally, but that doesn't mean they didn't keep an eye on us the whole time.  Makes me wonder what they are doing just outside our borders right now. ;D

That's odd, because of Suffolk around 1915 and 1916, she's been patrolling right of the New York coast, and she inspects US ships all the time (at least from what I remember).  ???
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on June 29, 2011, 12:25:45 am
Quote
That's odd, because of Suffolk around 1915 and 1916, she's been patrolling right of the New York coast, and she inspects US ships all the time (at least from what I remember). 

Then what we did may not have been across-the-board policy.  Makes me wonder what the real orders were to the US patrol ships.  Time to research again, I guess. ;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on July 01, 2011, 01:03:00 pm
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-38081/ADM%2053-38081-014_0.jpg

Basically while under refit in Port Said a lighter that was returning stores sunk alongside and there is a huge list of stuff that was lost.

Perhaps this entry should go under the "at last we have sunk something" thread or a new one headed "oops".
K
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Randi on July 01, 2011, 01:53:02 pm
sunk by an idiot ;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on July 01, 2011, 02:17:08 pm
One good reason for not using water soluble paint for marking a plimsoll line.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on July 03, 2011, 02:01:34 pm
From log of HMS Clio. Port Sudan April 1919.

Not quite sure what is happening here.

"SS Dahahlieh shifted out to single anchor in view of disaffection on board amongst Egypt troops and all communications were controlled by HMS Clio"

Dahahlieh seems to be a literal spelling of Ad Daqahliyah, which I think is a place in Egypt.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on July 03, 2011, 02:45:24 pm
From log of HMS Clio. Port Sudan April 1919.

Not quite sure what is happening here.

"SS Dahahlieh shifted out to single anchor in view of disaffection on board amongst Egypt troops and all communications were controlled by HMS Clio"

Dahahlieh seems to be a literal spelling of Ad Daqahliyah, which I think is a place in Egypt.



Red Sea events before 1919 (rebuffing Turkish acquisitiveness)
http://www.navy.gov.au/w/images/PIAMA21.pdf

And customary ingratitude:
http://countrystudies.us/egypt/28.htm
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on July 03, 2011, 10:37:42 pm
Thanks Bunts, fascinating stuff.

Suva seems to have made a huge contribution to the war against the Turks.

K
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: montanaisaleg on July 05, 2011, 06:28:10 pm
HMS Suva, 5th July, 1917
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-61884/ADM%2053-61884-005_1.jpg

"11.0 Whaler recalled.  Fired 5 rounds 4.7" amm and destroyed dhow"
then later (first pm entry):
"Fired 18 rounds 4.7" amm and 9 rounds 3 pdr amm destroying three dhows"

No explanation given.  Just didn't like those dhows, I guess.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: montanaisaleg on July 07, 2011, 02:58:31 pm
HMS Suva, 30th July, 1917
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-61884/ADM%2053-61884-018_0.jpg

Busy day aboard Suva.  Observed some flares in the morning (unsure if these are related to later events).  Afternoon: Helped the crew of a wrecked dhow.  Rescued crew, maxim gun, and other gear.  While hoisting the lifeboat after it returned from the dhow, it (the lifeboat) fell.  They lowered the whaler to pick up the lifeboat's stores, etc, then put the lifeboat in tow, where it promptly capsized.  At 8pm they "hoisted boat," but no indication of which boat.  Maybe the lifeboat.

"Lost in wrecked dhow Maxim spare part box with spare parts complete."
"Lost through lifeboat capsizing three air tanks and parts of casing."
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on July 07, 2011, 11:02:26 pm
HMS Suva, 5th July, 1917
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-61884/ADM%2053-61884-005_1.jpg

"11.0 Whaler recalled.  Fired 5 rounds 4.7" amm and destroyed dhow"
then later (first pm entry):
"Fired 18 rounds 4.7" amm and 9 rounds 3 pdr amm destroying three dhows"

No explanation given.  Just didn't like those dhows, I guess.

There was quite a lot of dhow sinking going on at that time. Both Clio and Odin did a fair amount. I understand that the main efforts in the Red Sea were to prevent gun running and provision of supplies to either the Turks or to Arabs supporting the Turks. Presumably any dhows found with guns etc on board were sunk.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on July 07, 2011, 11:38:52 pm
HMS Suva, 5th July, 1917
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-61884/ADM%2053-61884-005_1.jpg

"11.0 Whaler recalled.  Fired 5 rounds 4.7" amm and destroyed dhow"
then later (first pm entry):
"Fired 18 rounds 4.7" amm and 9 rounds 3 pdr amm destroying three dhows"

No explanation given.  Just didn't like those dhows, I guess.

There was quite a lot of dhow sinking going on at that time. Both Clio and Odin did a fair amount. I understand that the main efforts in the Red Sea were to prevent gun running and provision of supplies to either the Turks or to Arabs supporting the Turks. Presumably any dhows found with guns etc on board were sunk.


Either that or the captain had an Arabic/English dictionary that translated "dhow" as "target".
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: montanaisaleg on July 08, 2011, 02:28:33 pm
HMS Suva, 5th July, 1917
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-61884/ADM%2053-61884-005_1.jpg

"11.0 Whaler recalled.  Fired 5 rounds 4.7" amm and destroyed dhow"
then later (first pm entry):
"Fired 18 rounds 4.7" amm and 9 rounds 3 pdr amm destroying three dhows"

No explanation given.  Just didn't like those dhows, I guess.

There was quite a lot of dhow sinking going on at that time. Both Clio and Odin did a fair amount. I understand that the main efforts in the Red Sea were to prevent gun running and provision of supplies to either the Turks or to Arabs supporting the Turks. Presumably any dhows found with guns etc on board were sunk.


Either that or the captain had an Arabic/English dictionary that translated "dhow" as "target".

The Keystone Captain. 
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on July 08, 2011, 05:20:11 pm
I'm glad I answered the call for help with the Southampton -

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-60721/ADM%2053-60721-083_0.jpg

how great was that - see the 10:00 am entry and also the 2:00 pm one -

Kathy W.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on July 08, 2011, 05:34:11 pm
I'm glad I answered the call for help with the Southampton -

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-60721/ADM%2053-60721-083_0.jpg

how great was that - see the 10:00 am entry and also the 2:00 pm one -

Kathy W.


Considering the location, I bet they had corned beef sandwiches.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on July 11, 2011, 05:29:17 pm
An interesting day all around on the Mantua -

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-48275/ADM%2053-48275-011_0.jpg

Rigging for Church, taking on prize crews -  :o
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on July 12, 2011, 06:28:49 pm
Don't tell the pirates ...

4th February 1919, Challenger at Cape Town, records 'Finished taking on board bullion ?5,000,000'.  (the question mark should be a pound sign, but although I put it in as one, it comes out as question ...)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Thursday Next on July 12, 2011, 08:57:42 pm
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-67607/ADM%2053-67607-111_0.jpg

HMS Vindictive 30 July 1919

Account of an air raid on Kronstadt in the early hours
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Caro on July 12, 2011, 09:57:40 pm
Arlanza, November 4, 1917

Captain cautioned Engineer Sub Lieut FL Suter RNR for exceeding the limit of his wine bill for the month of October
by the amount of [pounds sterling]2 17 0d after a previous caution dated 14/1/17 and recorded in the winebook

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-34139/ADM53-34139-005_0.jpg

 :D One pound in 1917 had the purchasing power of roughly $US60 or 38 pounds now.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: ElisabethB on July 12, 2011, 10:13:26 pm
Ouch !
poor Engineer Sub Lieut FL Suter RNR ! (I do hope the wine was any good !  ;))
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: tastiger on July 14, 2011, 12:27:56 am
From Raven II:
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-57310/ADM%2053-57310-023_1.jpg
Morning: They had a brief battle with an enemy plane while hoisting in a seaplane.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Lancsgreybeard on July 14, 2011, 03:57:46 am
From Raven II:
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-57310/ADM%2053-57310-023_1.jpg
Morning: They had a brief battle with an enemy plane while hoisting in a seaplane.
What a superb log page, everything is clear but so understated, I would guess that the log-keeper's postcards would be rather more descriptive than the customary "Weather fine, digs acceptable, wish you were here"
lgb
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on July 14, 2011, 04:21:32 pm
From Raven II:
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-57310/ADM%2053-57310-023_1.jpg
Morning: They had a brief battle with an enemy plane while hoisting in a seaplane.
What a superb log page, everything is clear but so understated, I would guess that the log-keeper's postcards would be rather more descriptive than the customary "Weather fine, digs acceptable, wish you were here"
lgb

Yes, what a beautiful handwriting and interesting content, too! 
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: tastiger on July 15, 2011, 09:17:48 pm

What a superb log page, everything is clear but so understated, I would guess that the log-keeper's postcards would be rather more descriptive than the customary "Weather fine, digs acceptable, wish you were here"
lgb

Yes, what a beautiful handwriting and interesting content, too! 

That's why I love working on Raven II so much! The handwriting is the easiest to read I've ever seen, and it has hourly readings (except for barometric readings, which are every 4 hours, except when the ship is moving), so I shoot up in the rankings. Sure it's two pages per day but that averages out to 12 a page. I think what puts people off (and why this was at the bottom of percent complete for so long until recently) was that it's non-standard (which doesn't seem to stop other ships like Trent, Wonganella, etc.) and it's relatively inactive (I've done a few months, and so far, this is one of the few "interesting" things that have happened, other than a sudden gust of wind raming Raven II into the dock). It's a shame, it is probably the easiest non-standard ship to work through and a relatively quick ship. It could use some help, if you like!

Better stop talking now; now I'm just a captain bragging about his ship... :-[
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: bpb42 on July 16, 2011, 01:36:11 pm
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-67708/ADM%2053-67708-005_1.jpg

HMS Virginian, 5th Oct' 1915, on patrol off Iceland,

I hope I've somehow misread this entry....

'3.05 Captains dog overboard.Swung ship starboard.Eng as req'd
         boarding boat away

3.30 B Boat returned.'
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on July 16, 2011, 02:22:49 pm
I hope I've somehow misread this entry....

I fear not.
Force 5 wind, misty, waves up to 10 feet, air temp. 52, sea temp. 49. Looks like a poor outcome, unless it were a Newfoundland Dog.
I'd like to be wrong.
Shouldn't say this, really, but the presence of a dog could explain the deck scrubbing and ship cleaning.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: bpb42 on July 16, 2011, 03:10:34 pm
Yes, I'm afraid your right.This ship has a real talent for finding bad weather.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mugby on July 17, 2011, 09:44:39 am
Raven II has had a direct hit from enemy aircraft.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-57311/ADM%2053-57311-064_1.jpg (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-57311/ADM%2053-57311-064_1.jpg)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on July 17, 2011, 10:13:13 am
Fascinating. Typically understated record of what was presumably a really frightening experience.

Good to see they were back scrubbing decks (or what was left of them) within an hour and a half!!

I hope the injured all survived. I am not sure I want to look them up!!

K
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on July 17, 2011, 05:09:30 pm
Raven II has had a direct hit from enemy aircraft.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-57311/ADM%2053-57311-064_1.jpg (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-57311/ADM%2053-57311-064_1.jpg)

Interesting, too, that the log captured names of non-English individuals who were injured.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: montanaisaleg on July 19, 2011, 06:55:00 pm
Challenger, 17 Feb 1915
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-37518/ADM%2053-37518-084_1.jpg

Things get (potentially) interesting in the evening.  Enemy attack is considered "possible," so they landed all available men and guns, lit search lights, and moved "dreadnought" (didn't specify which) "to a position to command railway."
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on July 20, 2011, 07:13:09 am
Hurricane in Dundee?

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-55064/ADM%2053-55064-009_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mugby on July 20, 2011, 08:20:36 am
On 25th December 1916, Raven II

"Received 1 3Par Hoskiss 2F anti-aircraft gun from "Anne". "

Who says they didn't know how to celebrate Christmas?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on July 20, 2011, 09:13:01 am
On 25th December 1916, Raven II

"Received 1 3Par Hoskiss 2F anti-aircraft gun from "Anne". "

Who says they didn't know how to celebrate Christmas?

Hi Mugby, I hope you dont think I am being picky but could that be QF, not 2F. QF would stand for quick fire.

This gun: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/QF_3_pounder_Hotchkiss, was very common on the boats we are transcribing, both as secondary armament and for anti aircraft duties.

Hope this helps. K
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mugby on July 20, 2011, 11:24:47 am
On 25th December 1916, Raven II

"Received 1 3Par Hoskiss 2F anti-aircraft gun from "Anne". "

Who says they didn't know how to celebrate Christmas?

Hi Mugby, I hope you dont think I am being picky but could that be QF, not 2F. QF would stand for quick fire.

This gun: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/QF_3_pounder_Hotchkiss, was very common on the boats we are transcribing, both as secondary armament and for anti aircraft duties.

Hope this helps. K


Thanks  Tegwen ,you are right it is QF. The current log-keeper on Raven II has beautiful handwriting but Very elaborate capital letters
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: bpb42 on July 20, 2011, 07:41:43 pm
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-67710/ADM%2053-67710-012_1.jpg

Zig-zag pattern diagrams / pictograms from HMS Virginian,  - see  1am, 6am & two at 9pm.

Regards,
               Bernie
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on July 20, 2011, 10:53:17 pm
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-67710/ADM%2053-67710-012_1.jpg

Zig-zag pattern diagrams / pictograms from HMS Virginian,  - see  1am, 6am & two at 9pm.

Regards,
               Bernie


I've seen "zz diagram 51" and similar but this is much more informative for the likes of me. 
Ta.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on July 21, 2011, 11:51:15 am
Yes, for me too.  Gives me a much clearer idea of what was actually going on in all this zigzagging - and quite different to what my uninformed imagination had come up with!

Helen J
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: bpb42 on July 21, 2011, 07:11:41 pm
Your both very welcome, I'll try to post some other examples later.

Regards, Bernie

At 9am, one that actually is a zig-zag shape.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-67711/ADM%2053-67711-009_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: cyzaki on July 23, 2011, 08:18:23 am
Interesting to note that even a force 5 wind can cause a ship to pitch 'violently' - makes me feel sorry for anyone on board a ship with any sort of wind!

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-55064/ADM%2053-55064-018_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on July 24, 2011, 09:15:39 am
Not only football is popular in the Navy. Athletics are also important as they sent competition for athletic sports.

By the way, note that the times are given in four digits form as it is with todays armies.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-70441/ADM%2053-70441-020_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on July 25, 2011, 02:44:52 am
Yes to both - football and other athletic parties are quite common.  Although when sloop Torch sent a football party on shore at Fiji, they neglected to log the fact that they had lost the game.  (Australian newspapers have wonderful online archives about things like the gam scores.)

The decade or so our logs cover was the decade when the RN switched over to a 24 hour clock.  The oldest logs all have 12 hour am and pm.  The newest logs pretty much all use the 2400 system.  The fun part is reading the occasional way of logging the times by young men who are just trying to learn the new system.  Two of the them that I transcribed would time notes by 2400s but write on the line with the weather readings the am/pm time to allow them to translate back and forth. ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on July 25, 2011, 04:12:52 pm
HMS Donegal 15 March 1916 Scapa Flow
Nominal complement 670.

75 on sick list, one death occurred this day.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: bpb42 on July 25, 2011, 10:21:13 pm
Hi Bunts,
             when I transcriped the Donegal log  pages the system was still prone to 'jumping' around
between dates and I didn't see the March 15th 1916 page, but did get the preceeding fortnight.The ship was docked in Liverpool for the first week of March and departed for Scapa on the 7th.It would
seem that whatever the infection was, it was on board by that point.
The 'Sick list' figures for March 2nd to the March 12th were,
1,1,3,6,8,9,13,19,24,28 and 38 on the 12th.
In addition 4 people were discharged to a hospital ship on the 10th and two additional sick berth stewards joined on the 11th.

The next page I saw was March 22nd 1916 when the figure was 32.

One to return to when the voyage is complete and all the pages are available for viewing, I think.

Bernie

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on July 26, 2011, 12:03:58 am
Hi, Bernie,

Thanks for the background. I seem to have hit the jackpot.

Where I worked, 60% of the staff was female so we were used to being 10% understaffed. It only got serious when 30% were absent; or if one man was sick. (Do you think anyone will find that controversial?)

Anyhoo (while I'm still able to type) I'm still missing lumps or filling gaps depending on your point of view. A theory has occurred to me, which may be common knowledge, or wrong. You know how you're presented with a new page immediately after finishing one and it gets saved for your return? (Well it does for me.) With HMS Donegal's 200+ transcribers, depending on when they signed on, there could be a lot of "reserved" pages needing to be released at some stage. I wonder if we hit that boundary. Sorry for imposing this on you when you were only being kind. Life is so unfair.  ;)

B
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: bpb42 on July 26, 2011, 08:54:59 pm
Hi Bunts,
              I really don't know the answer to that. If there are 'Reserved' pages remaining then you
should be seeing them if you continue with the Donegal. Anyway thanks for taking on this one - she
must have been 'becalmed' for two or three months now.

Regards, 
                Bernie
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on July 27, 2011, 01:17:45 am
Bernie,

You'll be relieved to know that by the 5th May 1916, HMS Donegal, after several spells of patrolling and cruising in the fresh Scottish air off Scapa Flow, has shaken off all those nasty English germs and has no one on the sick list. We may have left a couple in hospital, it was hard to keep count.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: bpb42 on July 27, 2011, 08:02:32 pm
Hi Bunts,
                 that's good to know - many thanks.
Bernie
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on July 30, 2011, 07:53:12 pm
To be added to the long list of lost items: a Boat's Signal Book. This time not overboard.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-59866/ADM%2053-59866-005_1.jpg

I would not have been the rating responsible for this mischief. No further action was taken in the following days, so far as I know.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on July 30, 2011, 10:37:34 pm
At least it wasn't the ship's main book, that would have been worse.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Rogwherm on August 07, 2011, 03:27:13 pm
I'm working on the Patuca, currently beginning 1916.  But last year, 1915 there was an incident I had to do some follow-up research on ~ a collision!

(http://i1206.photobucket.com/albums/bb460/rogwherm1/ADM53-54674-018_0Collide.jpg)

1 July 1915
 "   0.30  Stopped       F.[I guess 'Full'] Astern  0.35
Collided S/S Oscar II of Stockholm
Standing by.  "

Typical terse, no-nonsense entry.  What happened there?  A collision at sea is not a walk in the park.

Later, early morning:

(http://i1206.photobucket.com/albums/bb460/rogwherm1/ADM53-54674-018_0Columbella.jpg)

"  Standing by
5.30.   H.M.S. "Columbella" arrived 
   alongside .   "

'Aha' thought I. The plot thickens!  A second ship comes to the rescue!

BUT, later:

(http://i1206.photobucket.com/albums/bb460/rogwherm1/ADM53-54674-018_0ResumePatrol.jpg)

"8.15 AM. Half speed ahead  S39W.
  8.30 ""   Full 13 knots.     Ordered to
   resume patrol until further orders"

What??  That's all? Later in the afternoon they even went so far as to exercise the guns' crews as per normal!  Here's when I delved into the web to find out more.  What happened to the other ship? How badly was Patuca damaged?

Among a number of references to this incident I came up with the following out of a book, The Merchant Navy the complete text of which is online.

"Orders had been received from the Admir-
alty that the Swedish steamer Oscar II, on passage from
Buenos Aires to Christiania with a cargo of coffee, hides,
etc., should be sent into port if she was met with. The
Patuca fell in with this vessel early on the morning of
July 1st, with disastrous results. The Oscar II struck the
Patuca on the starboard bow, crushing her own bow, and
then, rubbing alongside, she was holed in the engine-room
by the patrol ship's propeller. Some plates of the Patuca
were injured, and the flange of her propeller was badly
bent, but collision mats were requisitioned, and by shoring
up her side and filling in the spaces between the damaged
plates with cement, she was made sufficiently seaworthy
to proceed to the Clyde at 14 knots. "

I hope this isn't getting too long?  But I found the story fascinating. And the other ship, the Oscar II?  Well I read elsewhere that she was known as a notorious smuggler and blockade runner, hence the Admiralty's orders to search for her.  She was much more badly damaged, and despite the Royal Navy's best efforts with two or three ships in attendance to tow her in to port, she sank within two days! And that, fortunately with no loss of life as her crew had transferred to the Patuca when her engine room flooded, putting out her fires.

Amazing what's behind three short, nearly telegraphic lines in a logbook!

Cheers,
~~~~~~~~~~~~Rogwherm

Oh, here's the full page view:
(http://i1206.photobucket.com/albums/bb460/rogwherm1/ADM53-54674-018_0.jpg)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: portanucis on August 08, 2011, 09:29:10 am
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-46014/ADM%2053-46014-011_1.jpg

Some active sportsmen
on the Lancaster.
I wonder whether the Warrants  read later were in anyway related.

Portanucis
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on August 08, 2011, 11:34:12 am
the warrants were read at 5pm, before the sportsmen were due back onboard at 6pm.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Rogwherm on August 08, 2011, 10:39:26 pm
Oh, hey Folks,

As an addendum to that one I wrote about the collision of Patuca and the Swedish Oscar II I wonder what the logs of the Columbella have to say in those days, 1-4 July, 1915?  She was in attendance on Oscar II after the collision and during attempts to tow her in to port.

Any Columbella crew out there who have a handle on that?

Cheers
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Rogwherm
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on August 08, 2011, 10:58:33 pm
Oh, hey Folks,

As an addendum to that one I wrote about the collision of Patuca and the Swedish Oscar II I wonder what the logs of the Columbella have to say in those days, 1-4 July, 1915?  She was in attendance on Oscar II after the collision and during attempts to tow her in to port.

Any Columbella crew out there who have a handle on that?

Cheers
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Rogwherm


Your wish is my command:  ;)

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-38277/ADM%2053-38277-078_1.jpg
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-38277/ADM%2053-38277-079_0.jpg
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-38277/ADM%2053-38277-079_1.jpg
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-38277/ADM%2053-38277-080_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on August 09, 2011, 12:07:50 am
Sounds like the Columbella was spending most of her time doing ordinary patrolling.  What a shame that Patuca isn't complete yet, when she is we might want to come back to this thread - just to finish the story.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Rogwherm on August 10, 2011, 04:18:04 pm
I have done the complete remainder of that year, 1915, and can say that a day or two later Patuca was ordered back to port, where she was laid up in dry dock for a couple weeks if memory serves.  I'll have to go back and check that...

Hey and thank'ee, BT for the Columbella logs of that period.  It's definitely cool to see this incident from another perspective.  You wouldn't know anything had happened perhaps but for the abnormal congregation of HMSs.  Patuca, Digby, Royal Scot . . . 

On looking back at that book online, 'The Merchant Navy', I see it was really the latter two vessels that attempted to tow the stricken Swedish ship back to port. Here:

"The damage sustained by the Swedish ship was more
serious, and she started making water badly. The engine-
room filled, putting out the fires, and the crew abandoned
her and went on board the Patuca. The Admiral com-
manding immediately ordered the Columbella and Digby to
the scene of the accident, and the Royal Scot was detached
to tow the Oscar II to Stornoway. The Commander-in-
Chief of the Grand Fleet, on receiving intelligence of the
mishap, announced that destroyers would be in readiness
off the Butt of Lewis. The Royal Scot took the injured
vessel in tow, the Digby acting as escort. At 1 p.m. the
Digby reported that the upper deck of the Swedish vessel
was awash, and that the tow had parted. Three hours
later the Royal Scot had the steamer again in tow, but
the voyage promised to be a long lone, as no higher speed
than 4 knots could be made.

"Early the following morning the Digby reported that
another towing hawser had given out and that the wind
and sea were rising. The tug Plover was forthwith
dispatched from Stornoway to go to the assistance of the
Oscar II, but failed to locate her. Shortly before noon
the Royal Scot was still struggling with her burden, making
about 3| knots. Subsequently, OAving to the condition
of the damaged ship, all hands had to leave her. At
1.30 p.m. the tow again parted, but was once more picked
up by the Royal Scot. By this time the destroyers Staunch
and Fury had joined the escort. At 5 o'clock that afternoon
the towing operations had to be suspended, and an hour
later the tow once more parted. At 8.35 p.m. the Digby
reported that she was experiencing great difficulty in towing
as all the wires had gone except that attached to the cable
of the derelict, adding that there was no steam or hand
gear on her capstan. Early the following morning the
Oscar II, though completely water-logged, was still in
tow of the Royal Scot. At 6 a.m. the ships reached
lat. 59? 11' N., long. 7? 42' W., when steering became
difficult through the yawing of the derelict. At 9 a.m.
the tow again parted, the bollards having drawn and the
wires gone, and as further towing by the Royal Scot was
impracticable, that ship was sent to Stornoway to fill up
with water. The Digby, assisted by the Fury, then
attempted to pick up the tow, but unsuccessfully. By
this time the Oscar II had developed a list of 40 degrees
and the seas were sweeping over her. At 7 p.m. she sank,
and the Digby then returned to her patrol and the Royal
Scot went to Scapa Flow. "

All for now
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Rogwherm

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on August 10, 2011, 05:41:11 pm
All for now

That counts as a fine piece of understatement.
Reading the account of the determined effort to save the ship reminded me of Operation Pedestal and the saving of SS Ohio, or as she became fondly known "the O. H. 10". Admittedly the circumstances were different: Oscar II was, presumably, suspected of carrying contraband whereas the O. H. 10 was carrying a known lifeline for Malta, so really exceptional and imaginative risks were taken to preserve her.

Ohio using destroyers as crutches (http://www.killifish.f9.co.uk/Malta%20WWII/Photo%27s/War_Museum/Ohio.JPG)

Fuller account here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SS_Ohio
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on August 10, 2011, 08:55:12 pm
Quote
Hey and thank'ee, BT for the Columbella logs of that period.  It's definitely cool to see this incident from another perspective.  You wouldn't know anything had happened perhaps but for the abnormal congregation of HMSs.  Patuca, Digby, Royal Scot . . . 

On looking back at that book online, 'The Merchant Navy', I see it was really the latter two vessels that attempted to tow the stricken Swedish ship back to port. Here:

HMS Digby is also one of our still-active ships, although when she was lent to the France-in-exile navy, they gave her the name Artois, which is what her logs are listed under.  It will be very interesting to read her part of the story, since she was so active. ;D

HMS Royal Scot is not one of ours, so her role we will never know. :(
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: portanucis on August 12, 2011, 08:40:26 am
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-46015/ADM%2053-46015-004_1.jpg

Hi All,
I'm not sure if this item on the accidental loss of coal noted in H.M.S Lancaster's log-book is really "riveting" but I thought it might be of some interest.

Portanucis
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: portanucis on August 12, 2011, 09:09:46 am
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-46015/ADM%2053-46015-005_0.jpg

The crew seem to be in a rather careless mood these days on H.M. S. Lancaster. More losses overboard, though I must admit I have no idea what a 6" B.L. Brush piasaba (?)  is.
Maybe someone might have an idea?

Portanucis
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: ElisabethB on August 12, 2011, 10:23:18 am
I found this, could be the thing  :D
Piassava \Pi*as"sa*va\, n. [Pg. piasaba.]
   A fibrous product of two Brazilian palm trees (Attalea
   funifera and Leopoldinia Piassaba), -- used in making
   brooms, and for other purposes. Called also pia[,c]aba and
   piasaba.
   [1913 Webster]
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Randi on August 12, 2011, 11:14:11 am
In fact, there is quite a bit on it:
http://forum.oldweather.org/index.php?topic=1851.msg22980#msg22980
In short, it is used to 'sponge' out the gun (6"BL) barrels.
(I can't help wondering if they use a sponge to brush something else  ;))
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on August 12, 2011, 11:53:55 am
6" BL will be 6 inch Breach Loading.

If you really want you can read the manual here!!!

http://www.archive.org/stream/HandbookForThe6-inchBreechLoadingMarkXiiGun1917.G.2111717/BL6inchMkXIINavalGunManual1917#page/n1/mode/2up

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on August 12, 2011, 07:07:00 pm
These are some of the most dramatic pages I've come across.  I've also noted them in Additional letters and in Burials at Sea.

November 7th, 1915:
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-33201/ADM53-33201-011_1.jpg
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-33201/ADM53-33201-010_1.jpg
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-33201/ADM53-33201-009_1.jpg
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-33201/ADM53-33201-006_1.jpg
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-33201/ADM53-33201-012_0.jpg

According to Naval-History.net,  2 more of the injured died after this log note was written.

Sunday, 7 November 1915
Albemarle, pre-Dreadnought battleship, damaged by heavy seas off northern Scotland
 AIKEN, William J, Chief Petty Officer, 161866 (Po), died of injuries
 ARNOLD, Arthur E, Ordinary Seaman, J 22237 (Po)
 NAYLOR, David A, Able Seaman, J 18657 (Po)
 NIXON, George R, Commander, drowned
 STROUD, George E B, Able Seaman, 221919 (Po)

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on August 12, 2011, 07:14:12 pm
Remarkable that, amongst the damage, sufficient information survived in whatever form for the log to be compiled.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on August 12, 2011, 09:39:57 pm
These logs are all monthly copies.  I have no idea what the original log looked like, but it cannot have been pretty.  But they had over an hour to get reorganized before the first weather reading was due, which did not include any attempt to get at the indoor instruments; and there were only 6 days that had to be reconstructed, if they'd already sent in the previous month's log.  (Which is likely, in home waters.)  In some ways, insisting on normal structure must have been a great help in keeping sane and grounded.

What a distressing thing to strike in the dead of the night without warning.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: portanucis on August 13, 2011, 11:22:35 am
6" BL will be 6 inch Breach Loading.

If you really want you can read the manual here!!!

http://www.archive.org/stream/HandbookForThe6-inchBreechLoadingMarkXiiGun1917.G.2111717/BL6inchMkXIINavalGunManual1917#page/n1/mode/2up

Thank You Tegwen,
I'm sure the manual is of great interest to those who understand it . I'm afraid it's beyond me as I haven't the slightest knowledge of weapons.

Portanucis
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on August 14, 2011, 09:17:10 pm
To add to the long list of objects lost overboard:

After food and a dish, here comes a table cloth. Will the fishes get one day a table?  ::)

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-70442/ADM%2053-70442-017_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on August 14, 2011, 09:50:41 pm
Perhaps the sea will put them on the continental shelf.  ;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Randi on August 14, 2011, 10:06:46 pm
 :P
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: dorbel on August 14, 2011, 10:18:24 pm
The life of armed guards, put aboard a strange ship and told, "Take her into Stornoway" could be very interesting. On the 5th August 1917, Sub-Lt Wilson and an AG, usually a PO and 4 ratings, were put on board the Swedish SS "Jarl" from HMS "Orcoma". The Jarl was then sunk by a U-boat on the 9th, about 130 miles SW of the Faroes, fortunately without loss of life and later in the month while in Liverpool, the log reports the loss of their revolvers, holsters and sundry ammunition! Perhaps these items were stopped from their pay.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on August 14, 2011, 10:29:51 pm
"What? You are accusing us of deliberately chucking away our weapons, just so the U-boat crew wouldn't see as a threat?"
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Thursday Next on August 15, 2011, 01:53:43 pm
Well, it might have been a bit of a giveaway if you were trying to pass yourself off as just a regular member of the crew!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on August 15, 2011, 04:56:53 pm
The things they make boys do.
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-46005/ADM%2053-46005-005_1.jpg

06.00. Exd Boys at boat pulling and over masthead.

I have seen lots of boat pulling before but never "over masthead".

Presumably they had to run up the rigging to the very top of the mast and back down again. Poor little beggars, particularly at 06.00.

Isnt there something in the Geneva convention about cruel and unusual punishments?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on August 15, 2011, 06:07:16 pm
Though my fear of heights was fully developed before I was fifteen, at that age I was indestructible and wouldn't have allowed myself to be left (far) behind,  although 6.00am has never been my favourite time.
I believe the Geneva Conventions refer to opponents; we can treat "our own" with less consideration. Or rather, we could ... before Health & Safety became all encompassing.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: portanucis on August 16, 2011, 09:36:55 am

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-46015/ADM%2053-46015-014_0.jpg

More items lost overboard.
Apparently pollution of the sea it was not a problem then.

Portanucis
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on August 19, 2011, 09:44:27 pm
Marines also have their competitions.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-70442/ADM%2053-70442-118_1.jpg

And a good seaman has to be able to swim.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-70442/ADM%2053-70442-119_0.jpg

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: tastiger on August 22, 2011, 02:04:39 am
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-58290/ADM%2053-58290-034_0.jpg

Secured for typhoon

I can't find anything on the web, but it didn't sound very good.

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on August 22, 2011, 02:42:20 am
Even today the track of a hurricane or typhoon is difficult to predict precisely. Back then it would have been more tentative. Once an alert was given, the word would have been spread far and wide by radio and telegraph to put as many people as possible on their guard.
It may go/have gone elsewhere or fizzle(d) out without adverse consequences.

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: tastiger on August 22, 2011, 02:46:11 am
Even today the track of a hurricane or typhoon is difficult to predict precisely. Back then it would have been more tentative. Once an alert was given, the word would have been spread far and wide by radio and telegraph to put as many people as possible on their guard.
It may go/have gone elsewhere or fizzle(d) out without adverse consequences.

That explains why everything was fine the next day. :o
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: tastiger on August 22, 2011, 05:46:27 pm
After the first empty threat of a storm (see above), we now have a real storm hitting us.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-58291/ADM%2053-58291-009_1.jpg
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-58291/ADM%2053-58291-010_0.jpg

From the web: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/China_tropical_cyclone_rainfall_climatology#Hong_Kong
Apparently, it was the third wettest typhoon Hong Kong has received.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on August 22, 2011, 06:22:43 pm
After the first empty threat of a storm (see above), we now have a real storm hitting us.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-58291/ADM%2053-58291-009_1.jpg
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-58291/ADM%2053-58291-010_0.jpg

From the web: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/China_tropical_cyclone_rainfall_climatology#Hong_Kong
Apparently, it was the third wettest typhoon Hong Kong has received.


Here are the current warnings and means of transmission:
http://paguro.net/expat-life/local/hong-kong-china-sar/all-documents-hong-kong/chinasar_hongkong_climate
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Randi on August 22, 2011, 06:36:58 pm
HMS Birmingham --- 955. Entered thick fog.  1002 Fired depth charge
I guess they didn't have a fog horn ;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: portanucis on August 23, 2011, 03:58:35 pm
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-46016/ADM%2053-46016-015_1.jpg

Not much to celebrate on board the Lancaster on Christmas Day 1916. More coal, shovels and other items (indecipherable ?) accidently lost overboard.

Portanucis
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on August 23, 2011, 04:33:01 pm
My reading is that they were empty sacks, 15 of them that would hold 2 cwt each - Pattern no. 3, that went over the side, not the coal.
As for the shovels, it looks as though he's just put the inventory number 645, Naval shovels, 3 of them.
I find it difficult to reconcile my reading of the last one, in that company, but I think it's 1 mails (bag) Patt 444.
It's the Royal Navy's precise, pedantic phraseology.  8) innit?


Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on August 23, 2011, 06:22:11 pm
A very aptly named ship - the weather includes lightning from 2 - 6 am, and at 9am who should arrive but SS Lightning?

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-36256/ADM%2053-36256-010_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: portanucis on August 24, 2011, 04:01:53 pm
My reading is that they were empty sacks, 15 of them that would hold 2 cwt each - Pattern no. 3, that went over the side, not the coal.
As for the shovels, it looks as though he's just put the inventory number 645, Naval shovels, 3 of them.
I find it difficult to reconcile my reading of the last one, in that company, but I think it's 1 mails (bag) Patt 444.
It's the Royal Navy's precise, pedantic phraseology.  8) innit?

Thanks Bunting Tosser.
I admire your excellent eyesight  and your profound knowledge of the Royal Navy.

Portanucis
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on August 24, 2011, 04:14:21 pm
Portanucis,
You are exceedingly kind, but my knowledge arises from my experience of losing and crashing things, and getting things wrong ...
Did someone ask you to cheer me up?
Ta.
Bunts
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on August 24, 2011, 10:21:28 pm
Sometimes it is good being far away from Home: You get invited by the Colony for a luncheon and only seamen attended.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-70442/ADM%2053-70442-177_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: sean0118 on August 26, 2011, 09:18:12 am
How do you lose a torpedo? Let me know if I'm reading this wrong.  ???

"Hands employed sweeping for "Hydra's" lost torpedo"

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-38217/ADM%2053-38217-019_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on August 26, 2011, 10:43:23 am
Yes, you're absolutely right.  I'm not entirely sure how you lose one, but there's an interesting recent thread about how you go about looking for one!  It's in Ships Battles & People, called Hunt the Torpedo, and began on August 18th, so not far back.  I know there's probably some way of posting a link to it, but I'm afraid I don't know what it is .... :)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: sean0118 on August 26, 2011, 11:32:24 am
Thanks Helen, that thread made for an interesting read.   ;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: dorbel on August 26, 2011, 12:37:26 pm
It will be a practice torpedo, fired and intended to surface and be retrieved. Sometimes they failed to surface! Then the boat crews will go out and sweep, trailing a rope between two boats along the sea bed in the area. When they snag it they'll either try to catch it in a net or send a diver down if it isn't too deep.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: sean0118 on August 26, 2011, 12:59:08 pm
That seems right, Colne seemed to be working with Pincher. There was also diving boat alongside Colne a day or so later, no mention if they found the torpedo...
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on August 26, 2011, 06:22:44 pm
And destroyer Torch showed me how they sometimes spend 3 days looking and diving before giving up to get a new torpedo issued.  Those practice torpedoes must be very expensive!

Destroyer HMS Torch has just experienced 3 very sloppy days.  See the links for details, but here is the summary:

Oct. 14th (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-63333/ADM%2053-63333-025_0.jpg), they lost a torpedo during exercises and had to spend hours looking for it.
Oct. 15th (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-63333/ADM%2053-63333-025_1.jpg), they kept looking, with divers.
Also on Oct. 15th, they lost overboard a very complex mock buoy.
Oct. 16th (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-63333/ADM%2053-63333-026_0.jpg), after further looking they had to give up.

No one's idea of fun.  What kind of torture do the other crews in the flotilla perpetrate on them after this mess?

EDIT:  This was added to their woes on Oct. 19th (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-63333/ADM%2053-63333-027_1.jpg), making for a very, very bad week!!
     Drifter No.32 put hole in ship's side port side abreast 49 frame.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on August 26, 2011, 09:19:54 pm
Welland's log, 9 May 1918: http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-68388/ADM%2053-68388-007_1.jpg

2.0 SS Atlantique torpedoed  S/M attacked by Depth charges
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on August 28, 2011, 05:02:06 pm
Bluebell's log, 11 November 1921: http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-71521/ADM%2053-71521-024_0.jpg

12.0 Fired 21 gun salute for H.M. the King of Italy's birthday.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on September 01, 2011, 10:51:08 pm
HMS Ambrose:

Captain (S) came onboard to say goodbye to the Ships Company.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-70443/ADM%2053-70443-073_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on September 02, 2011, 12:55:08 pm
Same ship a few days later:

Discharged 1 Pte (Private) RMLI to shore. (Discharged by purchase).

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-70443/ADM%2053-70443-076_1.jpg

I don't understand what that means to is it a Mondegreen?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on September 02, 2011, 01:12:31 pm
Not a Mondegreen.
It's a Marine who is leaving the service before his "service" is complete. He has "bought himself out", paid compensation to the naval authorities for the lack of his presence. This is an extract from "King's Regulations & Admiralty Instructions":

"602. Discharge by Purchase.- Men and boys serving in the Royal Navy under continuous or special service engagements are permitted, in exceptional cases, to purchase their discharge.

Discharge cannot be claimed as a right, however, and nothing in these Regulations shall interfere with the power of the Admiralty to suspend discharge by purchase at any time, or to refuse discharge in a particular case.

2. Application for the discharge of a man or boy by purchase should be made to his Captain. The Captain is to be careful not to entertain or forward an application without fully satisfying himself that the applicant has good and substantial reasons for seeking the discharge.

3. On the home stations discharge by purchase may be authorised by the Commanders-in-Chief, the Rear Admiral of the Coast of Ireland, and the Admiral Commanding Coast Guard and Reserves, without reference to the Admiralty in, the following cases:

    Where the applicant has less than three months' service.

    Where the applicant has over six years' service and satisfactory evidence is produced that he has good employment to go to.

A quarterly return is to be rendered to the Admiralty, showing the number of discharges granted under the above authority.

In other cases at home, Admiralty authority is to be obtained.

4. On foreign stations, discharges are not to be allowed, except under pressing circumstances, when the decision will rest with the Commander-in-Chief, or, in his absence, with the senior officer present, if of Flag rank.

In all cases of discharge by purchase abroad, form S. 222, showing the circumstances, is to be forwarded to the Admiralty.

5. Scale of Payments.-The following is the scale of payments for discharge from the Service for men and boys, including marines :"

then there's table that won't copy easily. If you want to see it, it's here:
http://www.pbenyon1.plus.com/KR&AI/Instruct_Capts.html#SECTION%20XIV
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Rogwherm on September 03, 2011, 02:21:29 pm
Wow.  Someone lost a lot of stuff boarding a ship, and not such a harmless loss either.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-54674/ADM%2053-54674-149_0.jpg (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-54674/ADM%2053-54674-149_0.jpg)

Lost Overboard boarding "Pestalozzi"
1 Waist Belt
1 Ammunition Pouch 1 Frog 1 Bayonet 80 rounds of 756 Ammunition, 1 Jig, 1 cleaner.

Cheers
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Rogwherm
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on September 03, 2011, 02:34:58 pm
Not a Mondegreen.
It's a Marine who is leaving the service before his "service" is complete. He has "bought himself out", paid compensation to the naval authorities for the lack of his presence. This is an extract from "King's Regulations & Admiralty Instructions":

Thanks Bunts. I think that I'll have to learn by heart the whole Kings Regulation as a good rating should do.  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on September 03, 2011, 03:12:59 pm
KR&AI was like the bible in medieval times. For the information of the cognoscenti - the Officers; ratings who knew about it were called "Barrack Room Lawyers" and deemed to be troublemakers, taking things out of context and unable to see "the bigger picture".
So you needn't bother to learn it unless you have ideas above your station; or are a troublemaker.  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on September 03, 2011, 03:20:20 pm
I'm not questioning your reading.
"80 rounds of .756 ammunition" - was he on an elephant shoot? The fact that he spelt "ammunition" twice with a single m could account for the possibly erroneous calibre and makes me wonder whether he omitted to mention that there was an unfortunate marine wearing the belt at the time.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Randi on September 03, 2011, 03:25:02 pm
KR&AI was like the bible in medieval times. For the information of the cognoscenti - the Officers; ratings who knew about it were called "Barrack Room Lawyers" and deemed to be troublemakers, taking things out of context and unable to see "the bigger picture".
So you needn't bother to learn it unless you have ideas above your station; or are a troublemaker.  ;D

That's CAPTAIN h.kohler (HMS Bristol) to you  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on September 03, 2011, 03:28:58 pm
In that case "Get your head in the book" forthwith.  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: studentforever on September 03, 2011, 05:10:04 pm
He also commanded  Challenger so a bit of respect, please.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on September 03, 2011, 06:32:14 pm
Aye, aye, Captain.
 :P
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Thursday Next on September 06, 2011, 04:10:52 pm
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-37554/C2-ADM53-37554-253_0.jpg

HMS Changuinola, 6 August 1917:

4.12am: Obs two ship's boats brng S30W a/c to inspect them.
4.15am: Obs to contain shipwrecked crew. Red to half speed.
4.20am: Stop & received on board 5 officers & 41 men of S/S "Chagford"
4.43am: Proc full spd to intcpt HMAT "Saxon"
5.12am: Signalled trawler to proceed to assistance of S/S "Chagford" torpedoed in 56 36 N 10 35 W

Although referred to in the logs at this point as "S/S", the Chagford was actually a Q ship and there is an account of what happened in E Keble Chatterton's book, "Q Ships and their story".  She had been torpedoed about 24 hours earlier, eventually being hit three times altogether, at which point her captain ordered most of the crew to abandon ship.  However, the captain and four other crew members remained in case the U-boat crew attempted to board.  They too abandoned the ship during the night as the ship was about to sink.  They were picked up at 7.30am by the Saxon, who took the Chagford in tow.  Unfortunately she finally sank just before 8am on the morning of 7 August.  The Chagford had managed to inflict considerable damage on the U-boat which attacked her and it was left unable to submerge.  This is thought to have probably been U-44 subsequently sunk by HMS Oracle on 12 August 1917.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Thursday Next on September 06, 2011, 04:56:40 pm
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-37554/C2-ADM53-37554-260_1.jpg

HMS Changuinola, 21 August 1917

An unfortunate start for our convoy duty career - five hours out of port, two ships torpedoed.  There had been mention of a destroyer escort before we actually left - where were they when we needed them?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: bpb42 on September 08, 2011, 09:32:35 pm
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-56115/ADM%2053-56115-014_1.jpg
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-56115/ADM%2053-56115-015_0.jpg

HMS Pyramus, 23rd August 1917, sailing from Muscat to Aden, picks up an SOS message from
a ship asking for help.They reach the ship, the SS Alberta Cavaletto, several hours later to find her on fire.Pyramus maintains a position close by throughout the night and next day helps by towing the
steam ship for most of the day.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CousinJenny on September 14, 2011, 05:59:29 pm
Nothing so riveting as the above, probably pretty routine for a river gunboat in China, but it made me smile.

HMS Tarantula, 20th June 1923

2230 Kong Ming entered harbour. Lowered Motor Boat.
2235 Kong Ming proceeded down River.
2245 Motor boat moored up.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-86757/ADM%2053-86757-024_1.jpg (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-86757/ADM%2053-86757-024_1.jpg)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on September 14, 2011, 06:07:32 pm
Let's hope they don't forget where they left it.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on September 14, 2011, 06:16:08 pm
HMS Bramble 15th May 1917 Maskat

"0.55 Abraham Arab placed under arrest in Irons for striking"

Disappointing that he wasn't "clapped in irons". A little applause would have been nice.

"5.0 Abraham Arab released"
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CousinJenny on September 16, 2011, 12:08:03 am
On 26 July 1923 on board HMS Tarantula they?ve been having an exciting few days.  They?ve just come through a typhoon, during which they recorded barometric pressure assiduously (every half hour round the clock).  Yesterday and this morning, weather recording is back to the normal frequency, but I?m a little alarmed that they?ve started hourly barometer readings again from 1600 hours.  It was surprisingly tense watching the pressures fall ominously and the winds rise as the typhoon approached.

During the day today, instead of the usual scrubbing of decks, praying and granting leave to the watches they were doing this ? I think my favourite is the rather dramatic end to the day.

0615 Lowered skiff and sampan. Hands employed disembarking ammunition.
0800 Hands to bathe. 0815 Retire
1300 Hands employed disembarking ammunition. 1330 One Leading Seaman discharged to Hospital.
1400 1 Hammer (2lb). 1 Cable Punch (starting). 1 Cable Punch (driving) lost overboard by accident.
1500 Hoisted sampan and skiff. Lowered Motor Boat.
1600 Let go from West Wall. 1624 Secured to No. 20 buoy.
1800 Leave to Starbd Watch till 07.00.
2100 Rounds correct.
23.15 Motor Boat returned towed by ?Tamar? launch, having caught fire at Kowloon. Fire extinguished with no damage to hull but extensive damage to engine. Hoisted M.B.

That final comment is abbreviated because they were running out of space on the page, but it does make them sound rather exasperated. :)

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-86758/ADM%2053-86758-012_1.jpg (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-86758/ADM%2053-86758-012_1.jpg)

Edit: Yup. I was right to be concerned. It's now 27 July and they're hoisting the Typhoon Signal again and doing half-hourly barometer readings.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on September 16, 2011, 12:41:45 am
On 26 July 1923 on board HMS Tarantula they?ve been having an exciting few days.  They?ve just come through a typhoon,
Edit: Yup. I was right to be concerned. It's now 27 July and they're hoisting the Typhoon Signal again and doing half-hourly barometer readings.


So the 26th was either a pretty big "eye", or a "lull" between two typhoons?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CousinJenny on September 16, 2011, 12:59:33 am
I'm thinking possibly a lull between two.

22 and 23 July were the typhoon days and the Tarantula was in Canton.  24 and 25 July were nice, ordinary, boring days, a little drying out and refitting of the awnings, cleaning things, etc, moving to Hong Kong.  Then on 26 July they had all that excitement of losing equipment, sending a man to hospital and damaging the motor boat. On 27 July the barometer started dropping faster and lower and the number 6 typhoon signal was hoisted while they furled the awnings and prepared the boat for a typhoon (the previous time they only mentioned the awnings).
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: ElisabethB on September 23, 2011, 09:21:19 pm
What comes after March 29th 1920 in the HMS Kinsha's logs ?
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-45802/ADM%2053-45802-018_1.jpg

 ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on September 23, 2011, 09:40:12 pm
now that is just down right mean!!!  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on September 23, 2011, 10:25:29 pm
now that is just down right mean!!!  ;D

Perhaps he was writing it up on April 1st.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on October 04, 2011, 08:06:48 pm
Patuca, 3rd June 1916, 8.30pm

'Intercepted Danish whaler with whale.  All'd to proceed.'

I suppose it was a good way of proving they were who they said they were ....  Though who knows what contraband that whale might have contained?

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-54675/ADM%2053-54675-008_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on October 06, 2011, 12:03:28 am
Welland's log, 20 June 1914, Hong Kong: http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-68363/ADM%2053-68363-013_0.jpg

11.30 Typhoon signals (red) hoisted.

5.45 Black Typhoon signals hoisted.

6.0 Hands empld. securing ship for typhoon.

8.0 Ship secured, awnings furled & boats turned in.

21 June 1914: http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-68363/ADM%2053-68363-013_1.jpg

11.5 Typhoon signals hauled down.

Much ado about nothing?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on October 06, 2011, 12:22:45 am
"Hope for the best; prepare for the worst."
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on October 06, 2011, 12:37:49 am
I was struck by the thought of how better the weather folks are now at tracking hurricanes...  :o
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on October 06, 2011, 08:31:09 pm
HMS Patuca, 25th June 1916, in trouble with pack ice - so much for summer!

They begin at 2.43 'Stopped engines, unable to pass through the ice'.  They dodge about, trying to get through, but by the evening are still struggling '10.5 Unable to clear'; then the weather gets even worse '11.00 Set in wet and misty', and 11.55 'Pack ice close ahead'.

I was going to stop with this page for today, but I need to go on and find out how they get out!

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-54675/ADM%2053-54675-019_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: studentforever on October 06, 2011, 09:48:15 pm
Let us know what they do, please
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on October 07, 2011, 12:29:13 am
Welland's log, 8 July 1914: http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-68363/ADM%2053-68363-022_0.jpg

9.30 Walsh A.B. fell from anchor bed into bottom of dock.  Removed to sick bay,  Tamar, badly injured.

--I tried googling his last name with the ship's name, but nothing turned up.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on October 07, 2011, 03:39:32 pm
HMS Patuca, 25th June 1916, in trouble with pack ice - so much for summer!

They begin at 2.43 'Stopped engines, unable to pass through the ice'.  They dodge about, trying to get through, but by the evening are still struggling '10.5 Unable to clear'; then the weather gets even worse '11.00 Set in wet and misty', and 11.55 'Pack ice close ahead'.

I was going to stop with this page for today, but I need to go on and find out how they get out!

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-54675/ADM%2053-54675-019_0.jpg

Update - for the next several days they keep encountering ice, but seem not to get caught up in it.  There are entries such as 'avoiding pack ice' and 'sighted ice field northward'.  And they're keeping a very close eye on the water temperature, recording it hourly a lot of the time.  From the positions it looks as though they move towards the ice during the day, but retreat a bit south at night, which was presumably safer.  I'm transcribing anything I find about it, as I think it might well be of interest to the PTB, especially a record of the precise position where they came to the edge of the ice.  This was on 27th June, and the position was 66 21 N, 20 36 W, if anyone wants to look it up.  I've no idea how that compares to the ice today.
It's fascinating stuff.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Randi on October 07, 2011, 03:49:26 pm
You might put a note in the Natural Phenomena thread (http://forum.oldweather.org/index.php?topic=1779.0) to raise the visibility.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Press-ganged by the Swiss Navy on October 08, 2011, 01:28:44 pm
Possibly some deserters?
"Discharged 7 absentees bags and hammocks to HMS Egmont" (Malta RN base)

Sapphire had just spent the last month trying to clear Turkish trenches near Y-beach to allow the army to make progress - which they didn't. Hardly the glorious adventure that many young men signed up for in 1914.  :(

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-59130/ADM%2053-59130-014_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: heffkit on October 08, 2011, 09:52:36 pm
On HMS Perth at Aden, 8th May 1918...

'2pm Discharged 1 Pt R.M.L.I. to Aden detention barracks'
[no further detail given, but I suppose as the old saw has it - no name, no pack drill...!]

then 8 hours later...

'10pm Liberty men returned 2 Ratings missing'

Definitely a bad day at the office  :-[
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: heffkit on October 08, 2011, 10:48:42 pm
I wonder whether we ought to start a new, complementary, topic - 'Non events'

e.g. From HMS Perth, 11 May 1918 (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-55094/ADM%2053-55094-008_1.jpg)

'Landing party ashore attempting to destroy dhows - None found'
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Press-ganged by the Swiss Navy on October 09, 2011, 03:17:07 pm
 ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on October 09, 2011, 06:24:25 pm
Patuca, 15th July 1916, Atlantic Patrol

6.20am  Passed school of large whales

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-54675/ADM%2053-54675-029_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: bpb42 on October 10, 2011, 11:35:50 pm
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-67728/ADM%2053-67728-013_1.jpg


HMS Virginian, 21st June 1917, on patrol north west of Scotland,

'12.40 Passed ship's lifeboat bottom up'

'2.25 Passed ship's lifeboat, black, waterlogged, mast up'
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on October 13, 2011, 09:37:34 pm
I don't know if they had too much rum or if it was the snow, but it must be a record for sailing into harbour:

HMS Orvieto tried hard to enter Liverpool harbour, engines going wild, bumping into two ships. Finally after the second try they could find their mooring.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-53899/ADM%2053-53899-007_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Randi on October 13, 2011, 10:05:57 pm
Perhaps it was because of the rain, snow, and squalls - I hope!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries - STOP PRESS...
Post by: heffkit on October 13, 2011, 10:36:20 pm
HMS Perth, 30 Jun 1918 (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-55095/ADM%2053-55095-018_0.jpg), Gulf of Aden

'Lost overboard by accident Brooms Bass. 1 Broomhead Pat: no. 457. 1'



I somehow seemed to have missed this cataclysmic event in Churchill's 'History of the English Speaking People'...
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on October 13, 2011, 10:53:36 pm
It's suspiciously carefully documented.
It would have been dark at that time of day, snow would reduce visibility and reflect light back at the bridge, and (according to the text) the first bump was the other fellow's fault.

Welcome back to Liverpool.  ::)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: jennfurr on October 13, 2011, 11:24:42 pm
I don't know if they had too much rum or if it was the snow, but it must be a record for sailing into harbour:

HMS Orvieto tried hard to enter Liverpool harbour, engines going wild, bumping into two ships. Finally after the second try they could find their mooring.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-53899/ADM%2053-53899-007_1.jpg
I read the passage to my husband and he was cracking up.  We're both picture this ship moving like a person learning how to do a parallel parking job.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: studentforever on October 14, 2011, 08:38:03 am
Ships usually picked up a pilot to go up the Mersey and often used tugs as well. Perhaps her master was being either over confident or in too much of a hurry to anchor in harbour and no doubt would suffer an interesting time with his fellow captains at a Court of Inquiry.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: heffkit on October 14, 2011, 08:55:04 am
Sounds just like an extract from 'The Navy Lark' to me...

'Left hand down a bit....

Oops.  :-[

Cor, Lumme!'
   :D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on October 14, 2011, 10:11:31 am
All your comments on that incident made me curious. I also had a good laugh.
As I was thrown a few days ahead, I cheated a bit   ::) and found that there was a court on board. As far as I know, after the adjournment the court did not return on board.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-53899/ADM%2053-53899-009_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Randi on October 14, 2011, 12:00:23 pm
 :o ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on October 14, 2011, 09:06:02 pm
Good bye Liverpool.  :'(
After nearly two months, six weeks in dry dock, two or three fires on board without damages, HMS Orvieto finally sails. This time with tug and pilot
Still very precise in her movements.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-53901/ADM%2053-53901-014_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Randi on October 14, 2011, 09:33:59 pm
Don't know if you have seen this...
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/82/Dkbkpl26.jpg)

I couldn't help noticing the Exercised abandon ship stations and particularly out collision mats. I know that both are standard practice, but I suspect the crew was a bit more attentive than usual ;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on October 14, 2011, 10:57:46 pm
No I haven't seen it. Thanks for posting it, very useful to understand where they passed.

Yes, I think that they remembered their catastrophic entrance to Liverpool, that's why the precautions taken.

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on October 15, 2011, 03:02:35 am
In some logs, Alfred Dock, East Float and West Float are said to be in Liverpool but they are across the River Mersey in Birkenhead, about two miles upstream from Canada Dock.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/de/Dkbkpl31.jpg

(It looks like this is "Plate 2")
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Randi on October 15, 2011, 07:52:42 am
Yes ;D
The address for Liverpool is: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/82/Dkbkpl26.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on October 16, 2011, 01:15:21 am
Juno's log, 23 December 1916: http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-45476/ADM%2053-45476-014_1.jpg

1.45 OOG took bullion to HMS Bramble.

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on October 16, 2011, 02:34:33 am
Juno's log, 23 December 1916: http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-45476/ADM%2053-45476-014_1.jpg

1.45 OOG took bullion to HMS Bramble.



Thank you Ma'am. I can't give you a receipt, that date is a hole in my pages.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: ElisabethB on October 16, 2011, 06:24:31 pm
silly logkeeper (HMS Kinsha 3/11/1920)
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-45810/ADM%2053-45810-005_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on October 16, 2011, 07:04:39 pm
silly logkeeper (HMS Kinsha 3/11/1920)
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-45810/ADM%2053-45810-005_0.jpg

Well, it was late ....
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: ElisabethB on October 16, 2011, 07:18:48 pm
 ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: heffkit on October 16, 2011, 08:13:32 pm
(http://i1000.photobucket.com/albums/af129/heffkit/180721-21th.jpg) Someone got carried away in transcribing pages to the log...

...15th, 16th, 17th, 18th, 19th, 20th, 21th....   :-[



could happen to anyone!  ;)

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Randi on October 16, 2011, 08:18:55 pm
 ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: ElisabethB on October 16, 2011, 08:22:00 pm
Try and pronounce that !  :o ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: heffkit on October 16, 2011, 08:39:08 pm
It's easy after several measures of grog  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on October 16, 2011, 08:47:03 pm
Maybe that's where Patuca's missing pints of rum are going ....  Every few weeks there's yet another entry saying that Cask so and so should contain a certain number of gallons and pints, and is so many pints short.  They don't seem to find any way of preventing this, but go on recording it in the log.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: heffkit on October 16, 2011, 10:00:21 pm
I can't remember where Patuca is operating - but evaporation can get quite fierce at times!! ;D


That's their story & they're sticking to it  ;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: jennfurr on October 16, 2011, 10:29:50 pm
Maybe the ants that are holed up in the barometer are drinking it?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Randi on October 16, 2011, 10:50:10 pm
 ;) ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on October 17, 2011, 12:08:01 am
Juno's log, 6 January 1917: http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-45477/ADM%2053-45477-006_0.jpg

Note "height of barometer" reading at 8 pm: 32.23 .

Has anyone ever encountered a higher reading?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: tastiger on October 17, 2011, 12:18:54 am
Juno's log, 6 January 1917: http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-45477/ADM%2053-45477-006_0.jpg

Note "height of barometer" reading at 8 pm: 32.23 .

Has anyone ever encountered a higher reading?

I've seen 36.96.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on October 17, 2011, 12:29:23 am
Thanks...was just wondering, and couldn't find anything that listed the "range" of readings that a barometer might show.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: tastiger on October 17, 2011, 12:51:49 am
Thanks...was just wondering, and couldn't find anything that listed the "range" of readings that a barometer might show.

Well, I've also seen someone post up a 99.somethingsomething reading; it was probably just an error by the captain. ;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on October 17, 2011, 01:04:57 am
Thanks...was just wondering, and couldn't find anything that listed the "range" of readings that a barometer might show.
 

http://www.sciencecompany.com/barometric/barometer.htm
"Note that when using a weather barometer (usually with a scale range between 28 and 31 inches Hg) at a location above sea level, the reading must be corrected back to sea level. This is automatically accomplished when you initially match your barometer's reading to that reported by local TV or radio weather forecast. These reported readings have already been "corrected" to sea level, thus eliminating any pressure differences due to elevation."
(Useful tip for you, there. Remember to adjust for sea level. ::) )

"Barometric Reading - Forecast

Over 30.20" Rising or steady - Continued fair
Slowing falling - Fair
Rapidly falling - Cloudy, Warmer
 
29.80" to 30.20"  Rising or steady - Same as present
Slowing falling - Little change
Rapidly falling - Precipitation likely
 
Under 29.80" Rising or steady - Clearing, cooler
Slowing falling - Precipitation
Rapid falling - Storm "
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: jennfurr on October 17, 2011, 04:30:11 am
Lowest Barometric Pressure Ever Measured = 25.69 W. Pacific  10/12/1979  Typhoon Tip
The highest barometric pressure ever recorded on Earth was 32.06 inHg measured in Tonsontsengel, Mongolia on 19 December 2001

wikipedia
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on October 17, 2011, 03:29:48 pm
I can't remember where Patuca is operating - but evaporation can get quite fierce at times!! ;D


That's their story & they're sticking to it  ;)

They're in the north Atlantic - freezing is far more likely than evaporation!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Randi on October 17, 2011, 04:26:32 pm
Don't try to confuse the issue with the facts ;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on October 17, 2011, 06:40:02 pm
 :D  :D :D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on October 17, 2011, 07:16:27 pm
HMS Bramble Persian Gulf
"6 October 1918 1 on sick list
7 October 1918 4 on sick list
8 October 1918 4 on sick list
9 October 1918 4 on sick list
13 October 1918 4 on sick list
14 October 1918 4 on sick list
15 October 1918 12 on sick list
16 October 1918 17 on sick list
17 October 1918 40 on sick list
18 October 1918 48 on sick list
19 October 1918 65 on sick list

20 October 1918 60 on sick list at Basrah
2.05am Somali Jamma Hassen died
11.50 discharged 29 ratings to hospital
12.40pm dischd. 5 Seedies & 2 W.R. Servants to hospital
12.45 dischd. 3 officers to hospital
12.50 body of Jamma Hassen left ship for burial
5.40 discharged Captain to hospital

21 October 1918 0 on sick list

22 October 1918
7.30am discharged 3 ratings to hospital
6.0pm discharged 3 ratings to hospital

23 October 1918 0 on sick list

24 October 1918
9am 6 Seedies returned from hospital
4pm 1 Seedie dischd. to hospital

25 October 1918 0 on sick list "

HMS Bramble was a modest 700 ton gunboat. I have not found the ship's complement but a couple of days at sea with 60 on the sick list must have been a testing time.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: heffkit on October 17, 2011, 08:36:53 pm
Looks like you're seeing the effects of the 1918 inluenza pandemic (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1918_flu_pandemic) in HMS Bramble - we've just gone up to 43 sick in HMS Perth in late July 1918, which is presumably the same thing...  :'(
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Press-ganged by the Swiss Navy on October 18, 2011, 08:05:21 pm
I haven't read the influenza thread for a while, but it would be interesting to compare the infection rates within a ship's company. Amethyst experienced a very similar outbreak curve, peaking at about 45 sick I think, also in 1918 whilst in Gibraltar having stopped off in Sierra Leone on the way back from the South Atlantic.  Not a time to be around methinks.  :(
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries - medical mini-saga
Post by: heffkit on October 18, 2011, 10:59:47 pm
HMS Perth, Perim Straits, 1918

15 Aug*
3.15 [am] Boarded City of Chester took off one case for Hospital (Typhoid)
[5pm] Local Dr visited ship but could not take the case into Hospital. PMO of HMS Topaze came on board to see sick man.

16 Aug**
8.30 [am] Entered Perim Harbour and discharged PMO to Topaze
[11am] Crew employed getting stores out of No 3 hold ready for fumigation

17 Aug***
7.20 [am] Fumigation plant came alongside
7.50 [am] Commenced fumigating ship
2.15 [pm] Fumigating lighter left
[6pm] Fumigation finished opened up hatches etc

18 Aug****
8.00 [am] discharged one sick passenger to Hospital also one Army NCO to shore


NB 1 not sure whether fumigation was related to either this typhoid case, or the recent ?flu epidemic on board (I will post about that separately!), or neither.
NB 2 very few hard geographical locations given in this period of log-keeping, not sure where last bit was - on 18th

*http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-55097/ADM%2053-55097-010_1.jpg (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-55097/ADM%2053-55097-010_1.jpg)
**http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-55097/ADM%2053-55097-011_0.jpg (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-55097/ADM%2053-55097-011_0.jpg)
***http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-55097/ADM%2053-55097-011_1.jpg (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-55097/ADM%2053-55097-011_1.jpg)
****http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-55097/ADM%2053-55097-012_0.jpg (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-55097/ADM%2053-55097-012_0.jpg)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries - anatomy of an epidemic
Post by: heffkit on October 18, 2011, 11:39:35 pm
In answer to Press-ganged by the Swiss Navy, I have just noticed an outbreak of something (it's not specified in the log) which may, or may not, be influenza.

As you will see, it took about 1 week to peak, another to abate significantly, then a fortnight more gradually getting back to the mid-single figures, until the end of the fifth week by which time the numbers had returned to the usual low single figures.

To look at the figures (& chart) please open the attachment.
NB the large divisions on the horizontal axis are weeks.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on October 19, 2011, 02:52:45 am
Looks like you're seeing the effects of the 1918 inluenza pandemic (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1918_flu_pandemic) in HMS Bramble - we've just gone up to 43 sick in HMS Perth in late July 1918, which is presumably the same thing...  :'(


I'm kicking myself because I had intended to postulate that it was Influenza.  :-[
After that couple of days of uncompleted sick list returns (and 6 ratings sent to hospital) we had:
"6.35 Working party of 14 Lascars arrived from Dalhousie to assist mooring".
Whether or not we were moving to quarantine, we seem to have been short of manpower.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: jennfurr on October 19, 2011, 03:53:37 am

HMS Bramble was a modest 700 ton gunboat. I have not found the ship's complement but a couple of days at sea with 60 on the sick list must have been a testing time.

80 ratings (ordinary seamen), and 6 officers
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: heffkit on October 19, 2011, 06:57:09 am
Although we must be careful not to jump to conclusions - not all infectious diseases were influenza, even in Summer 1918. The epidemic lasted from June 18 to Dec 20, so we're still at the beginning of the global process here.

My main reason for scepticism is that that particular pandemic, like the 2009 one, was the H1N1 strain which had a mortality between 1 & 20%, and tended to affect the young and healthy (i .e. our study group) preferentially*. We should be seeing that proportion of 'burial at sea' or 'discharged dead' in such an outbreak in a ship.

Diarrhoeal diseases (such as salmonellosis) could cause just as rapid an outbreak, so we should be wary of ascribing diagnoses without firm evidence.

* http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/1918_flu_pandemic
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Randi on October 19, 2011, 07:42:00 am
Very useful to have a doctor on board! ;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: mugby on October 19, 2011, 01:50:24 pm
As the current captain of the Bramble, I think I've caught what they've got, so I'm going back to bed. (If I were male, I would describe it as "man-flu" )
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on October 19, 2011, 04:34:33 pm
As the current captain of the Bramble, I think I've caught what they've got, so I'm going back to bed. (If I were male, I would describe it as "man-flu" )

Oops.
Sorry, Captain. I've already reported sending you to hospital on 20 October (today is the 19th!)
http://forum.oldweather.org/index.php?topic=209.msg28111#msg28111
Jennfurr reckons more than half the crew is there.
Wrap up warm, and tell the wardroom to keep sending up the hot grog.
signal just received from their lordships at the Admiralty. "Get well immediately".
 ;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Press-ganged by the Swiss Navy on October 19, 2011, 06:22:29 pm
"Received 27 cases of milk from Dartmouth" - 28 Oct 1915, HMS Sapphire, Brindisi, Italy

Cappuccino crisis averted  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: ElisabethB on October 19, 2011, 07:39:12 pm
Phew ! Another major disaster averted !  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on October 21, 2011, 12:16:14 am
HMS Bramble 6 November 1918 Basrah

Since 23rd October, there has been a procession of ship's company to and from hospital. The captain is back on board and funeral parties have twice been landed.

Strictly speaking, "vaccination" is intended to be a protection against TB but we have been cautioned not to jump to conclusions. So, this may be associated with the recent mass illness with "vaccination" having been misused for "inoculation":
"Hands mustered for vaccination".
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: studentforever on October 21, 2011, 08:45:16 am
I was always told that vaccination came from the technique for early small pox protection where cow pox was used as the agent. As I remember from the dim and distant past of my school latin class vacca is the latin for cow.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on October 21, 2011, 04:32:33 pm
Quote
From Wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vaccine#History
The term vaccine derives from Edward Jenner's 1796 use of cow pox (Latin variola vaccinia, adapted from the Latin vaccīn-us, from vacca cow), to inoculate humans, providing them protection against smallpox.
...
Prior to vaccination, inoculation was practised, and brought to the West in 1721 by Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, who showed it to Hans Sloane, the King's physician.
...
Louis Pasteur generalized Jenner's idea by developing what he called a rabies vaccine, and in the nineteenth century vaccines were considered a matter of national prestige...

Diphtheria vaccine was developed in the 20s.  Polio vaccine came in the early 50s (I remember getting that one after some of my classmates died of it.)  The other early vaccines mentioned (measles, mumps, and rubella) didn't exist in the 1940s and  early 50s because I and my younger siblings all were raised with the traditional treatment for childhood diseases - go play with sick friends so you catch them while you are very young.  It mostly worked, but wasn't pleasant.

Could the crew be getting some kind of old-fashioned innoculation (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inoculation), using the high-status 'vaccine' label?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on October 21, 2011, 05:02:29 pm
Diphtheria vaccine was developed in the 20s.  Polio vaccine came in the early 50s (I remember getting that one after some of my classmates died of it.)  The other early vaccines mentioned (measles, mumps, and rubella) didn't exist in the 1940s and  early 50s because I and my younger siblings all were raised with the traditional treatment for childhood diseases - go play with sick friends so you catch them while you are very young.  It mostly worked, but wasn't pleasant.

Could the crew be getting some kind of old-fashioned innoculation (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inoculation), using the high-status 'vaccine' label?


Thanks, Janet,
I was too idle, or sleepy, to check on other pointy medical interventions, but I did wonder.

I was always told that vaccination came from the technique for early small pox protection where cow pox was used as the agent. As I remember from the dim and distant past of my school latin class vacca is the latin for cow.

And do you also remember "Agricola"? Not a Roman countryside drink, but "farmer".

"Arma virumque cano ... "
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on October 21, 2011, 05:31:19 pm
hey, I have a book about Agricola and Roman Britain -  :o

Kathy
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on October 21, 2011, 05:40:33 pm
hey, I have a book about Agricola and Roman Britain -  :o

Kathy
He didn't do much farming, though.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: studentforever on October 21, 2011, 09:03:09 pm
Oh yes, Bunts! And I can still recite the famous latin love poem
amo
amas
amat
...
as well; in fact I might even remember some more verses if I rack my (failing) brains.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: ElisabethB on October 21, 2011, 10:07:13 pm
amamus, amatis, amant (if memory serves me right  ;D)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: heffkit on October 21, 2011, 10:27:31 pm
Perfect!

And looking forwards... amabo, amabis, amabit, amabimus amabitis amabunt   ;)


We used 'Latin for Beginners' at school (almost invariably vandalised to 'Eating for Beginners')
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: ElisabethB on October 21, 2011, 10:32:51 pm
 ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Press-ganged by the Swiss Navy on October 22, 2011, 08:04:25 am
HMS Sapphire seems to be the love boat  :-*:-

"Read banns of marriage (3rd time) of P.O.T. Vergine, R. Jarvis, S Pewnell & J. Diblin"  (corrections to the names welcome)

26 August 1917, Bombay

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-59136/ADM%2053-59136-016_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on October 22, 2011, 02:26:44 pm
I think the third bachelor of this ship is S. Pennell.
Certificate of banns is (normally) valid for three months so, fingers crossed, they should be hitched before Christmas, which would leave them with eleven months before the Armistice.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: tastiger on October 22, 2011, 08:30:19 pm
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-46574/ADM%2053-46574-044_1.jpg

9:30 A.M. Rear-Admiral Grasset and Staff visited Ship and invested Commander-in-Chief with Insignia of Commander of the Legion of Honour.

3:00 P.M. (ish) Discharged ratings on C.inC.'s personal Staff to Admiralty House.

Definitely one of the more interesting pages from this ship. Sorry for taking this page from you Jennfurr.  :(
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Press-ganged by the Swiss Navy on October 22, 2011, 08:36:02 pm
Thanks, Cap'n Bunts!  ;) I bet at the wedding(s) they drank lots of gin.  (Bombay Sapphire - geddit. Boom Boom.  I'm here all week and don't forget to tip the waitress)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on October 22, 2011, 10:39:48 pm
Thanks, Cap'n Bunts!  ;) I bet at the wedding(s) they drank lots of gin.  (Bombay Sapphire - geddit. Boom Boom.  I'm here all week and don't forget to tip the waitress)


I've seen the stuff. It looks very pretty, but we officer types stick to the pink variety, and just sign the chit.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: jennfurr on October 22, 2011, 11:14:00 pm
Thanks, Cap'n Bunts!  ;) I bet at the wedding(s) they drank lots of gin.  (Bombay Sapphire - geddit. Boom Boom.  I'm here all week and don't forget to tip the waitress)


I've seen the stuff. It looks very pretty, but we officer types stick to the pink variety, and just sign the chit.

pink gin fizz?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on October 26, 2011, 12:13:08 am
Welland's log (on Dardanelles Patrol), 19 Feb 1915: http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-68367/ADM%2053-68367-012_1.jpg

8.5 Turkish battery near Kum Kale opened fire.  Proceeded out of range.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on October 26, 2011, 02:11:36 am
Welland's log, 26 February 1915: http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-68367/ADM%2053-68367-016_0.jpg

10.0  Took seaplane in tow.

10.15  Shipped seaplane, proc'd to Tenedos.

5 March 1915:  http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-68367/ADM%2053-68367-019_1.jpg
11.30 Proceeded full speed to assist fallen seaplanes.
12.10 As req for recovering wreckage & attending seaplanes.
3.0 Fired on by concealed field battery.
5.0 Night defence stns provided ammunition.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: LupusUK on October 26, 2011, 07:34:40 pm
HMS Usk 18th April 1915 Dardanelles

8.25 Fired on hostile aeroplane

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-66569/ADM%2053-66569-027_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on October 26, 2011, 08:10:14 pm
WHY!!!

Please see the 8.30 am entry:

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-62874/ADM%2053-62874-008_1.jpg

This sort of thing drives me batty!  What were they doing that they had to do it under flag of truce?  ???

ack...

Kathy W.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Randi on October 26, 2011, 08:19:53 pm
Perhaps it was in German hands at that time?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on October 26, 2011, 09:08:23 pm
I'm wondering why the ship went there in the first place - if it was at the time an enemy port, thus the flag of truce, why did the ship have to go there, as opposed to Zanzibar, which was its base at the time.  Where did the motor boat come from? - was some neutral party leaving Dar-es-Salaam? Some sort of humanitarian mission? 

Kathy
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on October 26, 2011, 09:41:48 pm
It may have been that, retrieving a negotiating team:

"By early 1916, there were over 1,000 African Schutztruppe
in the capital (Dar es Salaam). The British Navy bombarded Government House and the
railway workshops in December 1914, but otherwise the town itself did not
figure in military action until British forces moved in unopposed to occupy
Dar es Salaam on 4 September 1916 after a protracted siege."
http://eprints.soas.ac.uk/3189/1/Brennan_%26_Burton_chapter.pdf
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on October 27, 2011, 10:08:08 am
If I remember well, HMS Challenger did the same thing at Tanga Bay a few month earlier. The purpose was to sent letters and medical stores to POWs as well as letters to the local governor. A German speaking officer allways accompanied each vessel who met the Germans. Usualy the Enemy would sent a small craft and than meet the English boat off shore.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Press-ganged by the Swiss Navy on October 28, 2011, 01:27:27 pm
HMS Goliath lobbed a few shells into Tanzania in March 1915 on the way to get sunk at the Dardanelles..

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-43263/ADM%2053-43263-012_0.jpg
http://www.oldweather.org/voyages?ship=Goliath
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on October 28, 2011, 02:06:44 pm
HMS Goliath lobbed a few shells into Tanzania in March 1915 on the way to get sunk at the Dardanelles..

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-43263/ADM%2053-43263-012_0.jpg
http://www.oldweather.org/voyages?ship=Goliath

This type of seemingly (from the logs) random shelling of shore, without any indication of what they were aiming at, whether they hit it or anything else is very reminiscent of the roles of the Cadmus sloops, Espiegle, Clio and Odin in the Persian Gulf and Red Sea. It is always interesting to read up on the background behind these conflicts.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: jennfurr on October 28, 2011, 11:15:04 pm
From HMS Motagua:

Acting Paymaster E Hayes RNR dismissed from service by sentence of Court Martial.

Unfortunately, I don't know what he did, as it happened prior to my starting on her, and my pages are skipping a lot of days.  I looked around a bit by url surfing but haven't run across it yet.

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on October 28, 2011, 11:46:10 pm
I doubt the "why" will be online - I think that's one of the court records sealed for 99 years. :(
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on October 29, 2011, 12:00:48 am
From HMS Motagua:

Acting Paymaster E Hayes RNR dismissed from service by sentence of Court Martial.

Unfortunately, I don't know what he did, as it happened prior to my starting on her, and my pages are skipping a lot of days.  I looked around a bit by url surfing but haven't run across it yet.


Jumping to conclusions is my main form of exercise, so apologies to Mr Hayes ...
The association of the noun "paymaster" and the verb "cashier" leads me to suspect that there may have been a financial element to his departure. I do not intend to imply that any irregularity was deliberate; he may have employed a non-standard accounting procedure, as I did - my system was superior(!), but the Royal Navy was probably inflexible in its procedures.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: jennfurr on October 29, 2011, 02:34:08 am
I had one paymaster who was disciplined for losing the keys to the safe and not reporting it.  As soon as this ship's done (should be soon - it's jumped from 78% to 90+% in a manner of days), I'm going to go see if anything's mentioned.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: heffkit on October 29, 2011, 02:45:40 pm
http://www.oldweather.org/voyages?ship=Goliath

Brilliant! I had no idea that there were movies available for any of the ships' voyages - it's fascinating watching Goliath go up the East coast of Africa!

However, I was a bit surprised by the Captain's operational decision regarding negotiating Suez...

(http://i1000.photobucket.com/albums/af129/heffkit/150416-HMSGoliathSuez.png)

...whilst it would have taken a heck of a lot of camels and native labourers, at least the threat from submarines would have been significantly less.

(although, I can't erase from the back of my mind a Pythonesque vision of thousands of men being berated by the captain whilst pulling a ship over the desert, desperately trying to escape from the submarine behind, itself being pulled by hundreds of other men!!  :D )
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Randi on October 29, 2011, 05:35:04 pm
 ;D ;D ;D

Starboard = right
Port = left  ;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: jennfurr on October 29, 2011, 05:49:33 pm


...whilst it would have taken a heck of a lot of camels and native labourers, at least the threat from submarines would have been significantly less.

(although, I can't erase from the back of my mind a Pythonesque vision of thousands of men being berated by the captain whilst pulling a ship over the desert, desperately trying to escape from the submarine behind, itself being pulled by hundreds of other men!!  :D )

I've got the picture of the cast doing that skit in my head and I'm laughing hysterically.  My husband thinks it's a great idea too!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on October 29, 2011, 05:50:44 pm
I think a lot of things we read about in the logs would be great Python material  ;D

Kathy
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Thursday Next on October 29, 2011, 06:17:20 pm
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-37094/ADM53-37094-027_1.jpg

The Carnarvon goes onto a war footing.

I was lucky enough to get Armistice Day on the Changuinola, but this is the first time I have had the start of the War.  As I am on the third pass through the logs (what's left of it!) I feel very fortunate to have had this page to transcribe.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: heffkit on October 30, 2011, 12:07:04 am
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-37094/ADM53-37094-027_1.jpg

The Carnarvon goes onto a war footing.

I was lucky enough to get Armistice Day on the Changuinola, but this is the first time I have had the start of the War.  As I am on the third pass through the logs (what's left of it!) I feel very fortunate to have had this page to transcribe.

I'm just impressed that you can make out what the Surgeon Lieutenant actually wrote!  :)




on a serious note, though, it does send a shiver down the spine - I wonder how surprised the W/T operator was to receive the message?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on October 30, 2011, 01:00:13 am
I logged that period for the old sloop Torch, in the south Pacific.  It marked a total change in procedures.  Because she was so very old and slow, it also meant she was immediately stripped of almost all her experienced crew and officers, and members of the RNVR sailed her down to Aukland to be retired.

She taught me how a ship that primarily depends on sails for motive power reacts to small changes in wind, but there is no way she could have survived any part of that war.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Press-ganged by the Swiss Navy on October 30, 2011, 07:10:17 am
Ok, so we're all used to seeing "Lost overboard [spanners, rope, bucket, bag of potatoes etc]"  how about this one from Christmas Day 1917 -

"0.20 Seedie boy overboard."
 "Stop and recovered."

Did he jump or was he pushed? And what is a Seedie boy anyway?

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-59140/ADM%2053-59140-015_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Randi on October 30, 2011, 07:27:33 am
Ok, so we're all used to seeing "Lost overboard [spanners, rope, bucket, bag of potatoes etc]"  how about this one from Christmas Day 1917 -

"0.20 Seedie boy overboard."
 "Stop and recovered."

Did he jump or was he pushed? And what is a Seedie boy anyway?

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-59140/ADM%2053-59140-015_1.jpg

See: http://forum.oldweather.org/index.php?topic=671.msg27743#msg27743
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Press-ganged by the Swiss Navy on October 30, 2011, 05:18:00 pm
Thanks randi_2!

Oh, a quick message to anyone who has worked on HMS Bee. Sapphire met her in Muskat (Oman) in February 1918 - some way from the Yangtzee, but perhaps she was the Slow Boat to China.  I wanted to cross check with Bee's logs but I can't find it as the log sheets seem to be mixed up (respect to Captain and crew of the Bee who logged soooo many weather records)

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-59142/ADM%2053-59142-007_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on October 31, 2011, 11:11:50 pm
Welland's log, 25 March 1915:  http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-68367/ADM%2053-68367-029_1.jpg

10.30 Boarded Greek steamer.  Removed suspicious character for investigation.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on November 01, 2011, 10:46:31 pm
Welland's log, 4 April 1915: http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-68368/ADM%2053-68368-005_0.jpg
8.5 Proc'd astern of Prince of Wales.
8.40 Enemy forts opened fire.
10.30 Proc'd as req for Tenedos.  13 kts.  Hands preparing kites for returning.
11.45 Went alongside storeship & returned 2-6 ft kites, drew 1-9 ft kite.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on November 02, 2011, 12:09:44 am
Welland's log, 11 April 1915: http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-68368/ADM%2053-68368-008_1.jpg

11.0 Ship fired on by evening riflemen on shore.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on November 02, 2011, 11:38:53 am
Welland's log, 11 April 1915: http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-68368/ADM%2053-68368-008_1.jpg

11.0 Ship fired on by evening riflemen on shore.

That's a mondegreen.  ;D

It says:

11.00 Ship fired on by enemy riflemen on shore.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: LupusUK on November 02, 2011, 08:58:01 pm
HMS Juno 16 Sept 1917

Answered HMS Britomart's distress signal
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-45483/ADM%2053-45483-011_0.jpg

Any Britomart crew know what that was about?

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries (lost overboard)
Post by: heffkit on November 02, 2011, 09:25:28 pm
HMS Clio, Red Sea, 12 Feb 18 (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-38075/ADM%2053-38075-009_0.jpg)
(http://i1000.photobucket.com/albums/af129/heffkit/Clio180212-coirfender.png)

'One Coir Fender lost overboard by accident, also one anchor stock (40 lbs)'


PS might it be worth setting up a separate thread (or sub-thread, if such a being exists) for 'lost overboard...' items?
Just a thought!  :-\

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries (lost overboard)
Post by: Janet Jaguar on November 02, 2011, 09:37:21 pm
HMS Clio, Red Sea, 12 Feb 18 (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-38075/ADM%2053-38075-009_0.jpg)
(http://i1000.photobucket.com/albums/af129/heffkit/Clio180212-coirfender.png)

'One Coir Fender lost overboard by accident, also one anchor stock (40 lbs)'


PS might it be worth setting up a separate thread (or sub-thread, if such a being exists) for 'lost overboard...' items?
Just a thought!  :-\


Only if you want to search/find all the old ones and then talk one of the moderators into manually transferring each to the new thread.  Or use the "quote" function to copy them manually yourself. :o

On the other hand, starting any new thread you want for future "lost overboard by an idiot" notes, that's free and open to anyone with the will. ;D  (That translation of the phrase was a genuine mondegreen by a newbie who read a badly scrawled "accident" as "an idiot" - considered very appropriate by all. ;) )
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on November 02, 2011, 09:45:42 pm
HMS Juno 16 Sept 1917

Answered HMS Britomart's distress signal
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-45483/ADM%2053-45483-011_0.jpg

Any Britomart crew know what that was about?
\

I used the barometer page to find the previous and same day logs from the Britomart herself.  They apparently didn't tell the log keeper why they were in distress.
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-36243/ADM%2053-36243-009_1.jpg
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-36243/ADM%2053-36243-010_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries (lost overboard)
Post by: heffkit on November 02, 2011, 09:56:18 pm
On the other hand, starting any new thread you want for future "lost overboard by an idiot" notes, that's free and open to anyone with the will. ;D  (That translation of the phrase was a genuine mondegreen by a newbie who read a badly scrawled "accident" as "an idiot" - considered very appropriate by all. ;) )
I'd be willing to take up this challenge...
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on November 02, 2011, 10:16:13 pm
It's all yours! :)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: heffkit on November 02, 2011, 10:29:48 pm
Fingers crossed, here we go...  :)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on November 02, 2011, 11:35:09 pm
Fingers crossed, here we go...  :)

You can always tell kids born well after WWII by the fact that they have no regard for, or (perhaps) no knowledge of the expression "Never volunteer!"
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on November 03, 2011, 12:02:39 am
Welland's log, 11 April 1915: http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-68368/ADM%2053-68368-008_1.jpg

11.0 Ship fired on by evening riflemen on shore.

That's a mondegreen.  ;D

It says:

11.00 Ship fired on by enemy riflemen on shore.

Oh, my goodness!  Thank you for catching that.  I will correct it!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: tastiger on November 03, 2011, 12:07:21 am
Fingers crossed, here we go...  :)

You can always tell kids born well after WWII by the fact that they have no regard for, or (perhaps) no knowledge of the expression "Never volunteer!"

 ;D

You're right; I've never heard of that expression.  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on November 03, 2011, 12:12:11 am
Quote
You can always tell kids born well after WWII by the fact that they have no regard for, or (perhaps) no knowledge of the expression "Never volunteer!"

Now you will have to explain exactly why the WWII generation does say it! ;D  I - and the early baby boomer generation - remember older people using it, but it never really took in my consciousness.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries (lost overboard)
Post by: heffkit on November 03, 2011, 01:12:54 am
Only if you want to search/find all the old ones and then... use the "quote" function to copy them manually yourself. :o

On the other hand, starting any new thread* you want for future "lost overboard by an idiot" notes, that's free and open to anyone with the will. ;D

Done - both!   ;)


*here (http://forum.oldweather.org/index.php?topic=2155.0)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on November 03, 2011, 02:13:05 am
 ;D

I stickyed it for you, to make all that effort permanent.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: heffkit on November 03, 2011, 07:54:40 am
Why thank you, JJ!   ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: DJ_59 on November 03, 2011, 10:26:39 am

That was great stuff, heffkit.  It makes a great addition to our collection here.  Thanks.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: heffkit on November 03, 2011, 06:29:38 pm
My pleasure, DJ_59 - I've had so much help and encouragement from the forum, it's great to be able to make a contribution in return that might be of some use to the community!  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: LupusUK on November 03, 2011, 07:44:35 pm
HMS Juno 16 Sept 1917

Answered HMS Britomart's distress signal
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-45483/ADM%2053-45483-011_0.jpg

Any Britomart crew know what that was about?
\

I used the barometer page to find the previous and same day logs from the Britomart herself.  They apparently didn't tell the log keeper why they were in distress.
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-36243/ADM%2053-36243-009_1.jpg


http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-36243/ADM%2053-36243-010_0.jpg

I managed to edit the link to get the page for the 17th which gives more information
Diver reported Britomarts port tail end shaft fractured
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-45483/ADM%2053-45483-011_1.jpg

Sounds painful  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: DJ_59 on November 03, 2011, 07:49:14 pm

Yeah, you don't even want to know where they put the Cortisone shot for that.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on November 04, 2011, 12:37:01 am
Welland's log, 25 April 1915: http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-68368/ADM%2053-68368-015_1.jpg

8--- Boarded Italian steamer "Washington" of Venice from Alexandria to Vomilat etc.  Detained her until orders re her disposal received.  Cargo conditional contraband, & passengers under suspicion.

3.45 Closed SS Washington.  Placed prize crew on board.

4.30 Proc'd, escorting SS "Washington"

11.30 Sent boat to "Washington"

PS--if anyone has any better guesses as to the destination of this ship ???, I'd love to hear them.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: jennfurr on November 04, 2011, 01:00:49 am
Welland's log, 25 April 1915: http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-68368/ADM%2053-68368-015_1.jpg

8--- Boarded Italian steamer "Washington" of Venice from Alexandria to Vomilat etc.  Detained her until orders re her disposal received.  Cargo conditional contraband, & passengers under suspicion.

3.45 Closed SS Washington.  Placed prize crew on board.

4.30 Proc'd, escorting SS "Washington"

11.30 Sent boat to "Washington"

PS--if anyone has any better guesses as to the destination of this ship ???, I'd love to hear them.

I'm drawing a blank on this one.  All I can find is that she's a passenger transport ship, and that she's torpedoed and sunk off the coast of Italy in a year.  Even the Fuzzy Gazetteer is stumped on this one.  I'd say it's "vomit" and call it even?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: heffkit on November 04, 2011, 01:11:57 am
Heave to, Welland...   ;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on November 04, 2011, 01:42:28 am
Heave to, Welland...   ;)


(Nnnnh!)
I hope that "Heave" works in American English.
It's too good to miss, so I'll risk patronising szukacz with an explanation of "heave": one meaning is the involuntary contraction of abdomenal area and stomach immediately prior to "being sick" or vomiting.
While I'm at it, "to wretch" is the attempt to vomit but without producing any discharge. If you've ever been sea-sick you will recognise the combination heaving and wretching; even when the stomach has emptied its contents, the action can continue for ages after dry land has been reached. (And at least one train from Dun Laoghaire didn't have toilets, but it did have big, opening windows.)

I hope that no one is eating supper, breakfast, lunch, dinner, tea ....
 
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on November 04, 2011, 02:06:52 am
Jennfurr, coming from Alexandria to your patrol are, V~~~~ has to be in the Aegean, but looking at both Google and David Rumsey maps, I can't find anything like that in the Aegean or on my old map from Torch in the Black and Marmara Seas.  I did try.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: jennfurr on November 04, 2011, 02:19:15 am
Jennfurr, coming from Alexandria to your patrol are, V~~~~ has to be in the Aegean, but looking at both Google and David Rumsey maps, I can't find anything like that in the Aegean or on my old map from Torch in the Black and Marmara Seas.  I did try.

Oh lordy - I just plotted the lat/long of the Welland at noon (near Izmir, Turkey).  If the Washington is going from Alexandria to the Vomit-city, it could be any of the small Greek Islands or something near Turkey end of the Welland's patrol.  Either way, that leaves a lot of room for language error.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on November 04, 2011, 02:26:45 am
Jennfurr, coming from Alexandria to your patrol are, V~~~~ has to be in the Aegean, but looking at both Google and David Rumsey maps, I can't find anything like that in the Aegean or on my old map from Torch in the Black and Marmara Seas.  I did try.

Oh lordy - I just plotted the lat/long of the Welland at noon (near Izmir, Turkey).  If the Washington is going from Alexandria to the Vomit-city, it could be any of the small Greek Islands or something near Turkey end of the Welland's patrol.  Either way, that leaves a lot of room for language error.


I think it ends with an "h" but the only thing I could find was Voula south of Athens. On the coast but no suggestion of a port.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on November 04, 2011, 03:43:29 pm
 :o  You all are amazing--generously expending your time to figure out the destination of a particular ship, briefly mentioned in the Welland's log.  Although the mystery remains, I am humbled by the energy that each and all of you brought to working on the problem.

Thank you.

C.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on November 04, 2011, 03:57:05 pm
Inspired to do a little more fuzzy gazeteering, I must ask:  what do you think of Vounia in Cyprus?  If I squint and take away the downstroke on the "g" of Washington from the line above....  Could it just be a misspelling?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: jennfurr on November 04, 2011, 04:07:18 pm
Inspired to do a little more fuzzy gazeteering, I must ask:  what do you think of Vounia in Cyprus?  If I squint and take away the downstroke on the "g" of Washington from the line above....  Could it just be a misspelling?
I saw that city, but it still didn't fit to me...  and if that's an i superimposed with a g, then we're missing his displaced i-dot.

...and ship research is what I do in the wee hours of the night/morning when the baby's up!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: heffkit on November 05, 2011, 09:44:16 pm
HMS Princess, 12 Dec 16 (http://i1000.photobucket.com/albums/af129/heffkit/Princess181212-breakfast.png)

OK, I accept it's not particularly riveting, but has anyone else come across this:

(http://i1000.photobucket.com/albums/af129/heffkit/Princess181212-breakfast.png)

In my experience, this is the first time in months of logs that anyone has had breakfast!!

[EDIT  -20 mins later]

...and tiffin!  ;D

(http://i1000.photobucket.com/albums/af129/heffkit/Princess181212-tea.png)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Randi on November 05, 2011, 09:52:04 pm
I've seen it a few times. I think it is when the log keeper is bored. ;)
Sometimes supper or tea, more frequently dinner, rarely up spirits.

Here are some mentions new loggers dropped all mention of location --- but meals noted (http://forum.oldweather.org/index.php?topic=694.msg10137#msg10137)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: heffkit on November 05, 2011, 11:35:29 pm
HMS Princess, 13 Dec 16 (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-55863/ADM%2053-55863-008_1.jpg)

Had occasion to reprimand Acting Lieut F Keir RNR for negligently performing his duties as officer of the watch during the middle watch on the morning of the 12th. December.
C L Lewin captain R.N. 
Read by me. L Forbes Keir. Actg Lieut. RNR
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on November 05, 2011, 11:36:08 pm
ah, 4.00  Tea everyday on the Foxglove - as first, I thought that was captivating -  Look, they have tea!, but after a while, I was just yeah, yeah, tea and then supper  ;D

Kathy
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on November 06, 2011, 01:00:15 am
HMS Cumberland 5 Dec. 1917 at sea (eastbound from US)

"passed 6 masted schooner standg. S.Ward"

Mentioning the 6 masts suggests he was impressed, as am I.
Just one short of the record, apparently.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schooner
Not very pretty, IMO; ungainly like SS Eastland.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Press-ganged by the Swiss Navy on November 06, 2011, 08:25:12 am
 ;D  That 7-mast schooner looks like the outcome of a pub conversation....or you can imagine a the exchange between a blustering ruddy-faced trader and cringing navel architect:

 "I want more masts!! More sails! It will make it go faster so I can make more money. That upstart Wilberforce said I was a fool, but I bet him a hundred dollars that it would work and could beat his vulgar coal-fired steamers " 
 "Well, sir, it might go a bit faster, but turning her might be a tricky"; 
 "Don't give me excuses give me results! Or I swear you will never work in this town again!"
 *sigh* "Yes, sir."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_W._Lawson_(ship)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on November 06, 2011, 01:05:38 pm
ah, 4.00  Tea everyday on the Foxglove - as first, I thought that was captivating -  Look, they have tea!, but after a while, I was just yeah, yeah, tea and then supper  ;D

Kathy

In the past, when I've run across a new event (like "Tea!"), I would always transcribe it.  On the Welland, the "new" phrase was "Night defence stns. provided ammunition."  After the 40th time, I'm less inclined to do so, as it has now be come "routine,"  much like "Hands cleaning ship and chipping paint, as req'te."   But then, something unusual will get bundled into a particular entry or added at the end, and then I usually transcribe the whole entry, routine stuff and all.  It's a struggle between what we "should" transcribe, and how much additional effort I feel like expending...
Still, as I have been reminded, the focus is on the weather stuff, and the rest is just icing on the cake for those of us who like the brief glimpses into shipboard life back then.

C.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on November 06, 2011, 01:25:37 pm
I know - I have stopped recording the mundane - cleaning, painting, tea, supper, etc., but I also will include it if it is a part of something else -

Kathy
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on November 06, 2011, 01:30:48 pm
;D  That 7-mast schooner looks like the outcome of a pub conversation....or you can imagine a the exchange between a blustering ruddy-faced trader and cringing navel architect:

 "I want more masts!! More sails! It will make it go faster so I can make more money. That upstart Wilberforce said I was a fool, but I bet him a hundred dollars that it would work and could beat his vulgar coal-fired steamers " 
 "Well, sir, it might go a bit faster, but turning her might be a tricky"; 
 "Don't give me excuses give me results! Or I swear you will never work in this town again!"
 *sigh* "Yes, sir."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_W._Lawson_(ship)

See also:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_W._Lawson_%28ship%29
almost 500 ft and a crew of 19 including captain and pilot.
Compare that with:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Preu%C3%9Fen_%28ship%29
almost 500 ft and double the crew.
Both came to a sorry and premature end: 5 & 8 years service respectively, 17 lives lost on the former (gruesome circumstances) but none on the latter.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: heffkit on November 06, 2011, 02:47:53 pm
ah, 4.00  Tea everyday on the Foxglove - as first, I thought that was captivating -  Look, they have tea!, but after a while, I was just yeah, yeah, tea and then supper  ;D

Kathy

In the past, when I've run across a new event (like "Tea!"), I would always transcribe it.  On the Welland, the "new" phrase was "Night defence stns. provided ammunition."  After the 40th time, I'm less inclined to do so, as it has now be come "routine,"  much like "Hands cleaning ship and chipping paint, as req'te."   But then, something unusual will get bundled into a particular entry or added at the end, and then I usually transcribe the whole entry, routine stuff and all.  It's a struggle between what we "should" transcribe, and how much additional effort I feel like expending...
Still, as I have been reminded, the focus is on the weather stuff, and the rest is just icing on the cake for those of us who like the brief glimpses into shipboard life back then.

C.

Sums our job up perfectly, CHommel (and wendolk):

the quotidian for a given ship is taken as read, the exceptional is transcribed...   ;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: heffkit on November 06, 2011, 03:38:02 pm
HMS Princess, 12 Dec 16 (http://i1000.photobucket.com/albums/af129/heffkit/Princess181212-breakfast.png)

OK, I accept it's not particularly riveting, but has anyone else come across this:

(http://i1000.photobucket.com/albums/af129/heffkit/Princess181212-breakfast.png)

In my experience, this is the first time in months of logs that anyone has had breakfast!!

[EDIT  -20 mins later]

...and tiffin!  ;D

(http://i1000.photobucket.com/albums/af129/heffkit/Princess181212-tea.png)

and now, 18 days later, a third meal...!

(http://i1000.photobucket.com/albums/af129/heffkit/Princess181230-dinner.png)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on November 06, 2011, 04:23:53 pm
Hello heffkit

Here you got the whole collection on meals on one day, as they usually have onboard of HMS Mantua while at harbour. ;D

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-48292/ADM%2053-48292-014_0.jpg

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: heffkit on November 06, 2011, 06:22:42 pm
Hello heffkit

Here you got the whole collection on meals on one day, as they usually have onboard of HMS Mantua while at harbour. ;D

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-48292/ADM%2053-48292-014_0.jpg

Very impressive - not just a full set, but all piped, too!  ;D ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Press-ganged by the Swiss Navy on November 06, 2011, 07:08:21 pm

See also:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_W._Lawson_%28ship%29
almost 500 ft and a crew of 19 including captain and pilot.
Compare that with:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Preu%C3%9Fen_%28ship%29
almost 500 ft and double the crew.
Both came to a sorry and premature end: 5 & 8 years service respectively, 17 lives lost on the former (gruesome circumstances) but none on the latter.
[/quote]

Nice!

This one you can actually go on holiday on if you have a few guineas to spare....
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Clipper
http://www.starclippers.com/

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on November 06, 2011, 09:52:24 pm
Hello heffkit

Here you got the whole collection on meals on one day, as they usually have onboard of HMS Mantua while at harbour. ;D

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-48292/ADM%2053-48292-014_0.jpg

Very impressive - not just a full set, but all piped, too!  ;D ;D

Haggis four times a day ???
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: heffkit on November 06, 2011, 11:00:04 pm
Roll on Burns Night...  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on November 06, 2011, 11:39:35 pm
HMS Cumberland 7 Dec 1917 at sea (Eastbound, Nth Atlantic)

Shepherding a convoy of 12 ships.
Winds increasing throughout the night to force 11 (highest I've seen in Nth Atlantic)
Courses were 5 degrees either side of due East until SSW wind reached force 10 then ship headed SSW into wind at 1 knot. (Sauve qui peut! * as the French have it.)

8 Dec
2.0am Force 10 "3 of convoy in sight"
8.0am Force 6 "1 of convoy in sight"
wind veers steadily to NW, ship turns to keep head into wind
11.0am A/c to N78E
12noon A/c to N72E
3.0pm Force 6 "6 ships of convoy in Co."
6.0pm Force 6 "9 ships of convoy in Co."

Despite this inclement weather, there is no mention of anything lost or damaged.

9 Dec
11.0am "10 ships of convoy in Co."

* Often translated as "Everyman for himself" but I am advised that it's more of a "Save yourself, if you can."
Randi, Els?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on November 06, 2011, 11:41:16 pm
Roll on Burns Night...  ;D
No bread!
You'll have neeps and tatties like everyone else.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on November 07, 2011, 12:06:52 am
Welland, 16 May 1915: http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-68368/ADM%2053-68368-026_0.jpg

1.30 As req for attending on Doris during bombardment of searchlights on shore. 
3.30 Resumed patrol.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on November 07, 2011, 12:45:00 am
Welland's log, 19 May 1915: http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-68368/ADM%2053-68368-027_1.jpg
8.45 Hands empl'd refitting cab pendant & cleaning guns
9.15 Fired on by guns at Palio Tabia Point.

--Good thing they'd just finished cleaning theirs.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on November 07, 2011, 02:56:20 am
Welland's log, 19 May 1915: http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-68368/ADM%2053-68368-027_1.jpg
8.45 Hands empl'd refitting cab pendant & cleaning guns
9.15 Fired on by guns at Palio Tabia Point.

--Good thing they'd just finished cleaning theirs.
"Oh, you're not going to fire that, are you? I've only just got it clean!"
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: jennfurr on November 07, 2011, 03:30:43 am
Welland's log, 19 May 1915: http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-68368/ADM%2053-68368-027_1.jpg
8.45 Hands empl'd refitting cab pendant & cleaning guns
9.15 Fired on by guns at Palio Tabia Point.

--Good thing they'd just finished cleaning theirs.
"Oh, you're not going to fire that, are you? I've only just got it clean!"
No, it's "hurry up - put the guns back together - they're firing at us!"
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: jennfurr on November 07, 2011, 03:34:47 am
Roll on Burns Night...  ;D
No bread!
You'll have neeps and tatties like everyone else.
Stop it!  You guys keep making me look things up because I don't speak your version of English!!

(I knew tatties, but not neeps)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: studentforever on November 07, 2011, 07:47:27 am
No Jenfurr, neeps isn't English it's Scots which the SNP regard as a separate language but this isn't the place to go down that route.  There are people down in the South East of England who wouldn't understand it either.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on November 07, 2011, 09:43:15 am
Stop it!  You guys keep making me look things up because I don't speak your version of English!!
(I knew tatties, but not neeps)

Sorry!
(Not really) ;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on November 07, 2011, 03:45:53 pm
Roll on Burns Night...  ;D
No bread!
You'll have neeps and tatties like everyone else.
Stop it!  You guys keep making me look things up because I don't speak your version of English!!

(I knew tatties, but not neeps)

And the really genuine article is 'champit tatties and bashed neeps' ....  ::)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on November 07, 2011, 04:10:32 pm
And the really genuine article is 'champit tatties and bashed neeps' ....  ::)

You mean some people cook them ???

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on November 07, 2011, 04:43:28 pm
And the really genuine article is 'champit tatties and bashed neeps' ....  ::)

Presumably "champit" and "bashed" are two different sorts of batter ...
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on November 07, 2011, 08:45:10 pm
And the really genuine article is 'champit tatties and bashed neeps' ....  ::)

Presumably "champit" and "bashed" are two different sorts of batter ...

More mashed than battered ....
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: heffkit on November 07, 2011, 10:52:49 pm
And the really genuine article is 'champit tatties and bashed neeps' ....  ::)

Presumably "champit" and "bashed" are two different sorts of batter ...

More mashed than battered ....
Sounds like we're getting dangerously close to that 'Glasgow kiss' again...  ;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on November 07, 2011, 11:39:17 pm

More mashed than battered ....

Oh, yes!
 ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Randi on November 09, 2011, 08:49:34 am
HMS Bristol - 16 July 1914 - Puerto Mexico
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-69477/ADM53-69477-016_1.jpg

10:00am - Empl'd preparing Ship for refugees + as req

4:00pm - Embarked refugees, members of Ex President Huerta's household



18 July - Puerto Mexico (still)
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-69477/ADM53-69477-017_1.jpg

12:30pm - Landed refugees

 ???



20 July - Puerto Mexico (still)
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-69477/ADM53-69477-018_1.jpg

3:00pm - General Huerta visited ship

4:00pm - Embarked refugees

6:45pm - Sailed "Dresden" with General Huerta



28 July - Vera Cruz
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-69477/ADM53-69477-025_1.jpg

3:00pm - Disembarked Refugees. (Mexican)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on November 10, 2011, 01:44:31 am
Welland, 25 May 1915:  http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-68368/ADM%2053-68368-030_1.jpg

11.30 Stopped.  Received 1 Turk & 1 Greek, prisoners, from Greek caique suspected of espionage.

6.30 Received 5 prisoners from fishing boat.  Placed them under armed guard.

Wikipedia says a caique is a "...traditional fishing boat used found among the waters of the Ionian or Aegean seas."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ca%C3%AFque

26 May 1915: http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-68368/ADM%2053-68368-031_0.jpg

12.0 (Midnight) Discharged 3 prisoners to "Wear" under armed guard.

10.0 Discharged 2 released prisoners to Greek caique.

6.45 Fired at by field battery.

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on November 10, 2011, 01:55:39 am
Welland, 27 May 1915: http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-68368/ADM%2053-68368-031_1.jpg

8.30 Closed "Wear."  Discharged 2 Turkish prisoners to "Wear".
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on November 10, 2011, 02:05:59 am
Welland's log, 29 May 1915: http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-68368/ADM%2053-68368-032_1.jpg

7.0 Drew fresh meat.  Landed escort to search for absentees.
10.0 Escort & 4 prisoners returned. 
10.15 Landed escort
12.15 Escort & 3 prisoners returned.  Weighed & proc'd as reqte. for leaving harbour.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on November 10, 2011, 02:18:17 am
Welland, 30 May 1915: http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-68368/ADM%2053-68368-033_0.jpg

6.35 Fired on by enemy submarine (Turkish) as req. for chasing same at full speed, gun action, engaged submarine.

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on November 10, 2011, 11:45:56 pm
More action on the Welland, 2 June 1915: http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-68369/ADM%2053-68369-004_0.jpg

8.40 Proc'd as req for intercepting Turkish caique.
9.0 Captured caique, brought 3 prisoners onboard.
10.40 Proc'd for Port Iero with prize in tow, Co S15E  8.5 kts.
3.45 Turned over prize to "Euryalus"
7.30 Discharged 3 prisoners to "Euryalus."

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on November 11, 2011, 12:08:29 am
Welland's log, 4 June 1915: http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-68369/ADM%2053-68369-005_0.jpg

7.30 Closed "Wear".  Co & speed as req for patrol, & searching for survivors of Casabianca.
9.15 Boarded Greek caique.

Googled "Casabianca" and found the following on the "Wreck Site"  ( http://www.wrecksite.eu/wreck.aspx?58599 )

CASABIANCA was a French Navy Torpedo Cruiser of 970 tons of the D?iberville Class. In 1913 she was converted to a minelayer. On the night of the 3rd/4th June 1915, Turkey, off Smyrna she was sunk when hitting one of her own mines. The Allies attempted to blockade Smyrna and close off the Gulf of Smyrna with minefields. During the operation, "Casabianca" blew up and sank on one of her own mines.

6 June 1915:  http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-68369/ADM%2053-68369-006_0.jpg

4.30 As req for entering Port Afano.  Action Stns.
5.10 Opened fire on Turkish snipers & shipping, and assisted in covering Kennet's whaler.
6.0  Destroyed stranded picket boat by gunfire.
8.45 Hands cleaning ship & stowing fired cylinders. 4-12 pr 8 cwt empty cylinders lost overboard during action.
10.30 Read prayers. Piped down.
5.15 Stopped as req for salvage of gear from waterlogged cutter of ~~ "Casabianca"
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on November 11, 2011, 12:50:01 am
Really in the thick of it ...
Better to destroy one of our abandoned picket boats than one of our working submarines.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on November 14, 2011, 10:47:13 pm
Clio's log, 4 April 1918: http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-38077/ADM%2053-38077-005_0.jpg

0.40 Stopped & boarded dhow, took crew prisoners, & sank dhow.

5 April 1918: http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-38077/ADM%2053-38077-005_1.jpg

10.30 Handed over to military custody 9 prisoners of war.

6 April 1915: http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-38077/ADM%2053-38077-006_0.jpg

9.10 Took dhow in tow from Camaran launch  Crew in custody on board.
1.30 Handed over to Military, prize dhow & five prisoners.
Title: Re: Changing the clocks
Post by: heffkit on November 16, 2011, 12:45:56 pm
HMS Princess, 22 May 17 (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-55868/Z1-ADM53-55868-014_0.jpg) - en route from Zanzibar to Durban

(http://i1000.photobucket.com/albums/af129/heffkit/Princess170522-clocksretarded.png)

It just struck me, I wonder whether there was a standard procedure for recording the time of clock changes...
Would the recorded time (in this case 5.00 - or just possibly 5.50!!) be the old time or the new time?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on November 16, 2011, 04:34:45 pm
It just struck me, I wonder whether there was a standard procedure for recording the time of clock changes...
Would the recorded time (in this case 5.00 - or just possibly 5.50!!) be the old time or the new time?


Having lain awake far longer than 9 minutes worrying about that very point, I determined that the time shown would be the new time, as the expression used is in the past tense. That decision solved my insomnia.
dorbel will be able to answer from personal experience rather than a linguistic assumption.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: heffkit on November 16, 2011, 07:06:15 pm
It just struck me, I wonder whether there was a standard procedure for recording the time of clock changes...
Would the recorded time (in this case 5.00 - or just possibly 5.50!!) be the old time or the new time?

Having lain awake far longer than 9 minutes worrying about that very point, I determined that the time shown would be the new time, as the expression used is in the past tense. That decision solved my insomnia.
dorbel will be able to answer from personal experience rather than a linguistic assumption.
The trouble with linguistics is that a participle, whilst commonly past (as in 'was retarded'), can be present ('is being retarded') or future ('is about to be retarded'), and can even be adjectival (as in 'the retarded clock')  - the logs strip the language of its finesse...

...so we have to rely on experiential empiricism, methinks 

         - and I hope that doesn't bode for another night's buntian insomnia... ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on November 16, 2011, 08:19:46 pm
The trouble with linguistics is that a participle, whilst commonly past (as in 'was retarded'), can be present ('is being retarded') or future ('is about to be retarded'), and can even be adjectival (as in 'the retarded clock')  - the logs strip the language of its finesse...

...so we have to rely on experiential empiricism, methinks 

         - and I hope that doesn't bode for another night's buntian insomnia... ;D

Mere semantics, my Dear Sir.
I have no cause the doubt the word of an officer and a gentleman. He has composed a complete sentence, albeit passive, using the perfect tense intransitively. The fact that, in general, logkeepers write in jargon will not shake my faith in this officer's grammatical integrity.
In addition to that, I have a conscience bottle of Dr. Macallan's Sleeping Mixture so, as helenj would doubtless attest, "all manner of thing shall be well". Not that I'm suggesting that she has ever been treated by the good Dr. Macallan. (Although it wouldn't surprise me if she had.)  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on November 16, 2011, 08:39:10 pm
I like to visit the Captain, Morgan by name, when I am under the weather or in need of treatment.  I understand Drs. Beam and Walker also have a thriving practice.

 ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on November 16, 2011, 08:45:20 pm

In addition to that, I have a conscience bottle of Dr. Macallan's Sleeping Mixture so, as helenj would doubtless attest, "all manner of thing shall be well". Not that I'm suggesting that she has ever been treated by the good Dr. Macallan. (Although it wouldn't surprise me if she had.)  ;D

Terrible confession coming up - I'm a Scot (more or less) who doesn't like whisky.  Gin and tonic is more my tipple ....   ;)

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on November 16, 2011, 08:47:05 pm
I like to visit the Captain, Morgan by name, when I am under the weather or in need of treatment.  I understand Drs. Beam and Walker also have a thriving practice.

 ;D

You are, obviously, a virtuous, spiritual person.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on November 16, 2011, 08:59:40 pm
 ;D ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: heffkit on November 16, 2011, 09:20:32 pm
In addition to that, I have a conscience bottle of Dr. Macallan's Sleeping Mixture so, as helenj would doubtless attest, "all manner of thing shall be well". Not that I'm suggesting that she has ever been treated by the good Dr. Macallan. (Although it wouldn't surprise me if she had.)  ;D

Any friend of Julian is a friend of mine...  ;D

  ...also, if needed in my case for any storm, it's Dr Port (which is quite appropriate here on several levels - not least sea!)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on November 16, 2011, 10:15:07 pm
Any friend of Julian is a friend of mine...  ;D

  ...also, if needed in my case for any storm, it's Dr Port (which is quite appropriate here on several levels - not least sea!)

Yep, always nice to vada their dolly old eeks.
Hope the storms don't occur during working hours.
Title: Coals to Newcastle...?
Post by: heffkit on November 16, 2011, 10:25:55 pm
HMS Princess, 16 Jun 1917
 (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-55869/Z1-ADM53-55869-011_0.jpg)
(http://i1000.photobucket.com/albums/af129/heffkit/Princess170617-drtohosp.png)

.. or perhaps more physician heal thyself?   ;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on November 16, 2011, 11:21:53 pm
Clio's log, 19 April (although the log keeper did not fill in this page, it's 1918): http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-38077/ADM%2053-38077-012_1.jpg

11.0 5 prisoners of war embarked.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: JamesAPrattIII on November 21, 2011, 03:20:08 am
I have one from HMS Odin that you don't see very often 28 Jan 1920 "Landing party foot  inspection" or words to that effect.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on November 21, 2011, 03:29:21 am
I have one from HMS Odin that you don't see very often 28 Jan 1920 "Landing party foot  inspection" or words to that effect.

Looking for signs of Marianas Trench Foot?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on November 21, 2011, 10:38:35 pm
Clio's log, 12 June 1918: http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-38079/ADM%2053-38079-009_0.jpg

5.35 (a.m.) Armed party returned with Mustapha & staff, secure from Night Defence.

5.55 (p.m.) Discharged Mustapha & staff to shore.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Gixernutter on November 22, 2011, 06:48:32 pm
HMS Juno, 5th April 1916, (in Bushire I think as no location, but sending supplies to shore field gun crews). Log entry attached shows Mr Bradshaw - Gunner, being 'Cautioned' for an excessive wine bill. Good job they can't see my wife's......

Link: http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-45469/ADM%2053-45469-005_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Gixernutter on November 22, 2011, 10:42:45 pm
HMS Juno, secured snugly in harbour for weeks, with nothing untoward happening. Suddenly on 12th April, she up sticks, steams full speed down Red Sea (even through the night which is almost unheard of, even in war) until 5-54pm on 13th when she suddenly stops. See http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-45469/ADM%2053-45469-009_1.jpg

Log entry says 'transacts business with HMS'.......

Blank, Nada, Zip. The Commodore is away, so maybe the Captain is having a private venture?

However, the excitement is not over, as Juno then proceeds onward at full speed. More to follow later...?

Nope. Got to Bombay and anchored up. Can only think they had placed a take away order......  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on November 26, 2011, 10:10:29 am
Unusual way to celebrate Christmas on HMS Lancaster

Esquimalt, Christmas Day 1918.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-46039/ADM%2053-46039-015_1.jpg

See 7.30pm.

"Fire in Gunners Ready Use Store. Went to fire stations."

Fortunately it didnt last long and was not serious as they "Secured" at 7.35.

K
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Gixernutter on November 26, 2011, 09:51:27 pm
HMS Clio, 9th July 1919 off Port Sudan; involved in searching for the Tug "Wapping". No idea what has happened to the tug or what caused to her to be 'mis-placed'.

See link at 2-45pm: http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-38086/ADM%2053-38086-007_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: lollia paolina on November 27, 2011, 10:30:04 am
HMS Cumberland December 1918 :

Navigating Officer, Lt. C.dr. (N) A. Beauchamp St. John, is using green ink to write December logs. Here is a sample page:

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-39073/ADM%2053-39073-008_1.jpg

I was wondering why he chose green ink. :)
It is quite hard to read logs, as green ink faded, especially in the date area. Possibly something else happened as some logs look like if ink has been washed away.
   


Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on November 27, 2011, 12:54:52 pm
I bet there were quite a few sighs of relief at the end of this day:

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-57790/ADM%2053-57790-007_1.jpg

Kathy
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: tastiger on November 27, 2011, 03:09:21 pm
HMS Cumberland December 1918 :

Navigating Officer, Lt. C.dr. (N) A. Beauchamp St. John, is using green ink to write December logs. Here is a sample page:

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-39073/ADM%2053-39073-008_1.jpg

I was wondering why he chose green ink. :)
It is quite hard to read logs, as green ink faded, especially in the date area. Possibly something else happened as some logs look like if ink has been washed away.
   

In a December on Suffolk, the captain started writing in purple ink. These captains and their fascination with colors. ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: jennfurr on November 27, 2011, 03:43:02 pm
oh that green is horrid!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on November 27, 2011, 09:52:14 pm
Yep.
It's almost "Sea Green" on my printer.
Apologies, Lieut. Lollia, I got that book at the end of the evening. Half a dozen pages and I was going cross-eyed. You certainly made good progress. I think some transcribers must have given up at that point because, despite your recent activity, I still have December pages to transcribe.

Who's a lucky boy, then?  ;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: szukacz on November 28, 2011, 09:37:16 am
"Held swimming sport in Colliope Dock".
Wiki:
The Calliope Dock is a historical stone drydock on the grounds of the Devonport Naval Base, in Devonport, Auckland, New Zealand. It was built in 1888 to service ships of the British Royal Navy, and is still in use today.
I hope that they had water!  ;D
Calliope (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-73188/ADM%2053-73188-082_1.jpg)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on November 28, 2011, 04:25:11 pm
I found this to be an interesting page from the Ribble - there were at least 54 different zig zag patterns.  I wonder if new patterns were developed for each individual convoy, based on the number of ships in it, or if there was a general guide detailing all the possible patterns - does anyone know about this?  Here is the page -

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-57790/ADM%2053-57790-024_1.jpg

Kathy
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: szukacz on November 28, 2011, 04:50:39 pm
HMS Chatham
10.30 American Consul came in board
10.50 American Consul left ship. Fired salut 11 guns  8)

20 minutes walk and the boom of 11 guns.  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: lollia paolina on November 28, 2011, 06:11:05 pm
Yep.
It's almost "Sea Green" on my printer.
Apologies, Lieut. Lollia, I got that book at the end of the evening. Half a dozen pages and I was going cross-eyed. You certainly made good progress. I think some transcribers must have given up at that point because, despite your recent activity, I still have December pages to transcribe.

Who's a lucky boy, then?  ;)

Hi Bunting Tosser,
I hope you reached December 22nd, 1918. At Noon, Navigating Officer ran out of green ink and I am under the impression he ran away, too.
From that point a new handwriting, very clear indeed, appears. The new Navigating Officer used black ink and that makes reading much more comfortable. :)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Gixernutter on November 28, 2011, 06:44:53 pm
Yep.
It's almost "Sea Green" on my printer.
Apologies, Lieut. Lollia, I got that book at the end of the evening. Half a dozen pages and I was going cross-eyed. You certainly made good progress. I think some transcribers must have given up at that point because, despite your recent activity, I still have December pages to transcribe.

Who's a lucky boy, then?  ;)

Hi Bunting Tosser,
I hope you reached December 22nd, 1918. At Noon, Navigating Officer ran out of green ink and I am under the impression he ran away, too.
From that point a new handwriting, very clear indeed, appears. The new Navigating Officer used black ink and that makes reading much more comfortable. :)
I don't envy anyone transcribing the log with 'sea green' ink. That is awful! Good luck.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on November 29, 2011, 01:16:41 am

Hi Bunting Tosser,
I hope you reached December 22nd, 1918. At Noon, Navigating Officer ran out of green ink and I am under the impression he ran away, too.
From that point a new handwriting, very clear indeed, appears. The new Navigating Officer used black ink and that makes reading much more comfortable. :)

Thanks for the good news, Silvia. I hadn't.
I've not been hiding today, a five year old (and a girl at that  ::) ) has been demanding more attention and patience than I thought I possessed; and her mother is no easier; and the laptop is out on loan.  :-\

OK. Teeth gritted. Spirits raised. Ready to walk on water.  ;D

Bunts
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on November 29, 2011, 01:20:07 am
HMS Chatham
10.30 American Consul came in board
10.50 American Consul left ship. Fired salut 11 guns  8)

20 minutes walk and the boom of 11 guns.  ;D


"And if you dare to come back, you'll get more of the same!"  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on November 29, 2011, 02:35:12 am
I found this to be an interesting page from the Ribble - there were at least 54 different zig zag patterns.  I wonder if new patterns were developed for each individual convoy, based on the number of ships in it, or if there was a general guide detailing all the possible patterns - does anyone know about this?  Here is the page -

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-57790/ADM%2053-57790-024_1.jpg

Kathy

During my time on HMS Ribble, I remarked on this variety of ZZ.
Janet J posted: http://forum.oldweather.org/index.php?topic=1105.msg24231#msg24231
And, I think, bpb42 reposted DJ_59's http://www.history.navy.mil/library/online/onipubno30.htm
"There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy."
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: bpb42 on November 29, 2011, 01:18:44 pm
Hi Bunts,
              I didn't post that USN document, but I did post some pages from HMS Virginian showing diagrams of the zig-zag patterns they were using.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-67710/ADM%2053-67710-012_1.jpg

Regards,
              Bernie
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on November 29, 2011, 02:15:56 pm
Hi Bunts,
              I didn't post that USN document, but I did post some pages from HMS Virginian showing diagrams of the zig-zag patterns they were using.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-67710/ADM%2053-67710-012_1.jpg

Regards,
              Bernie


Thanks, Bernie.
I knew you were implicated in some way that made an impression on my always poor, now deteriorating memory.  :-[

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on November 29, 2011, 02:35:44 pm

Hi Bunting Tosser,
I hope you reached December 22nd, 1918. At Noon, Navigating Officer ran out of green ink and I am under the impression he ran away, too.
From that point a new handwriting, very clear indeed, appears. The new Navigating Officer used black ink and that makes reading much more comfortable. :)


Ah! Bliss!
Made it.
I'm going to report the Green Ink Monster to the PTB.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: lollia paolina on December 01, 2011, 09:29:45 am
HMS Cumberland : May 21st, 1919
Baptised in the Church of England the children of Charles Joseph Henry Goring and Winnie Oustina Goring (nee Linwood).

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-39075/0061_1.jpg

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: studentforever on December 01, 2011, 10:04:15 am
Fascinating - four of them. I think the name of the father is Charles, the nee means that her name before marriage or maiden name was Linwood. We have borrowed the french form, blame the Normans.  I suspect that there was no anglican priest on the island and so the visit of HMS Cumberland (with Chaplain?) offered an opportunity to baptise their children.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: lollia paolina on December 01, 2011, 10:19:32 am
Fascinating - four of them. I think the name of the father is Charles, the nee means that her name before marriage or maiden name was Linwood. We have borrowed the french form, blame the Normans.  I suspect that there was no anglican priest on the island and so the visit of HMS Cumberland (with Chaplain?) offered an opportunity to baptise their children.

The system does not accept the correct spelling for nee. I am sorry the first e has an acute accent, but I could not find a way to convince the forum 'to type' that letter.  :)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: bpb42 on December 02, 2011, 01:21:32 pm
Approaching Halifax, NS, on 25th Sept' 1918, HMS Virginian attacks an iceberg..

  '9.30 Exercised action on iceberg. 9 rounds per gun.
 10.10 Cease fire.'

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-67743/ADM%2053-67743-015_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on December 02, 2011, 01:31:33 pm
Approaching Halifax, NS, on 25th Sept' 1918, HMS Virginian attacks an iceberg..

  '9.30 Exercised action on iceberg. 9 rounds per gun.
 10.10 Cease fire.'

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-67743/ADM%2053-67743-015_1.jpg

Titanic Avenged!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Randi on December 02, 2011, 01:37:22 pm
Approaching Halifax, NS, on 25th Sept' 1918, HMS Virginian attacks an iceberg..

  '9.30 Exercised action on iceberg. 9 rounds per gun.
 10.10 Cease fire.'

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-67743/ADM%2053-67743-015_1.jpg

Titanic Avenged!
;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on December 02, 2011, 01:42:45 pm
Probably one of the most riveting pages I have transcribed.

I just joined HMS Victorian to help finish her off and two pages in I got to this one.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-67414/ADM%2053-67414-015_0.jpg

It tells of the arrival of her convoy from Sydney to London, including the gradual wind down of the watch level, the end of zig zagging, the unloading of guns and setting of mines to safe etc. You can almost feel the relief of all involved as they arrive from that huge journey.

I hope I havent upset any of her regular crew by posting this and transcribing the final day of that journey that you have all worked on.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on December 02, 2011, 02:22:24 pm
I had a day like that on the Ribble (on convoy escort duty) - you could almost feel the tension as the ships stopped zigzagging and formed a single line to enter the harbor the convoy was bound for - all the ships made it and I heard the sigh of relief despite the distance and time.

Kathy

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on December 02, 2011, 02:27:17 pm
Fascinating - four of them. I think the name of the father is Charles, the nee means that her name before marriage or maiden name was Linwood. We have borrowed the french form, blame the Normans.  I suspect that there was no anglican priest on the island and so the visit of HMS Cumberland (with Chaplain?) offered an opportunity to baptise their children.

The system does not accept the correct spelling for nee. I am sorry the first e has an acute accent, but I could not find a way to convince the forum 'to type' that letter.  :)


For the sake of completeness:
HMS Cumberland 21 May 1919 Georgetown Grand Cayman

"Baptised into the Church of England:
Carmen Elmina born Jan 13 1909;
Huxley Max March 5 1911;
Melville Joseph July 6 1913;
Randolph Edward Aug 27 1916;
Haig Ferdinand Nov 26 1918;
being the children of Charles Joseph Henry Goring, Law Agent & Winnie Oustina Goring (nee Linwood) of Grand Cayman I, B.W.I."
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Caro on December 02, 2011, 03:08:47 pm
Probably one of the most riveting pages I have transcribed.

I just joined HMS Victorian to help finish her off and two pages in I got to this one.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-67414/ADM%2053-67414-015_0.jpg

It tells of the arrival of her convoy from Sydney to London, including the gradual wind down of the watch level, the end of zig zagging, the unloading of guns and setting of mines to safe etc. You can almost feel the relief of all involved as they arrive from that huge journey.

I hope I havent upset any of her regular crew by posting this and transcribing the final day of that journey that you have all worked on.

I believe Victorian was on her way from Sydney, Nova Scotia, to London.
The relief was no less intense.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on December 02, 2011, 04:04:00 pm
Thanks Caro. The North Atlantic convoys is an area of OW I have barely touched so please forgive my ignorance that there was a Sydney in Nova Scotia.

As you say though, the relief must have been the same wherever the convoy had come from.

K
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Caro on December 02, 2011, 04:39:56 pm
I remember this story from many years ago: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/2172858.stm  ;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on December 03, 2011, 12:13:13 am
Clio's log, 13 January 1914: http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-38067/C2-ADM53-38067-0053_1.jpg

8-0-0.  Saluted Japanese Admiral with 15 guns.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: DJ_59 on December 03, 2011, 12:30:56 am
I remember this story from many years ago: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/2172858.stm  ;)

Pickup trucks and lobster??  "Big disappointment" is a major understatement.

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on December 03, 2011, 12:56:34 am
HMS Cumberland 19 Jul 1919 Oban

"8am Dressed ship overall in honour of Peace Day. Hands rigging illuminating circuits
Noon. Paraded guards. Fired 21 gun salute & Feu de joie. 
Provost Sheriff of Oban on board
4pm Ship open to visitors
10pm Illuminated ship
11pm Fired 21 gun salute Fired V.B.S. & Very lights, rockets etc."

Peace Day wasn't peaceful everywhere: http://www.aftermathww1.com/peaceday.asp

(And no, I don't know what V.B.S. is/are.)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on December 03, 2011, 01:00:27 am
I suspect they did not use the same travel agent for their next trip. 

Cape Breton Island has some very beautiful, windswept scenery.  My husband and I traveled there many years ago.

I also remember that during the trip, our car's clutch went out, and we eventually were referred to a young mechanic who actually tightened the clutch for us and refused to take any payment for the repair.  Simply amazing.  I have had a pretty high opinion of Canadians ever since.  Truly kind, honest, wonderful people.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: lollia paolina on December 03, 2011, 12:03:11 pm
HMS Thistle - April 29th, 1919 :

9/0 Landed Dental Party

11/15 Dental Party returned

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-62911/ADM%2053-62911-017_1.jpg

and April 30th Dental Paty landed again :)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Randi on December 03, 2011, 03:26:07 pm
HMS Virginian - going from Avonmouth (UK) to New York
I have faithfully recorded as written the noon DR and Obs lat/long
They have, miraculously, placed us in the (very, very inland - and very, very off route) Aral Sea.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-67742/ADM%2053-67742-004_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on December 04, 2011, 03:35:29 am
 ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Gixernutter on December 05, 2011, 11:25:21 pm
HMS Virginian - going from Avonmouth (UK) to New York
I have faithfully recorded as written the noon DR and Obs lat/long
They have, miraculously, placed us in the (very, very inland - and very, very off route) Aral Sea.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-67742/ADM%2053-67742-004_1.jpg
Obviously chose the scenic route. Simples!  :D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on December 06, 2011, 03:25:10 pm
HMS Atraea has been presented the Battle Practice Cup by the Commander in Chief.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-34351/ADM53-34351-114_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on December 06, 2011, 04:49:07 pm
HMS Atraea has been presented the Battle Practice Cup by the Commander in Chief.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-34351/ADM53-34351-114_0.jpg

I wonder who they competed against?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on December 06, 2011, 10:30:31 pm
Welland's log, 8 November 1916: http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-68379/ADM%2053-68379-007_0.jpg

8.5 Co & speed as reqt. for reconnoitering Gulf Sandouli. Enemy's battery on northern shore fired on "Welland."  (all short)  Fired 13 Rds in reply. (Common ??? shell)

(Probably should have put this in handwriting help, but it was riveting, too...)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Gixernutter on December 06, 2011, 10:38:27 pm
Welland's log, 8 November 1916: http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-68379/ADM%2053-68379-007_0.jpg

8.5 Co & speed as reqt. for reconnoitering Gulf Sandouli. Enemy's battery on northern shore fired on "Welland."  (all short)  Fired 13 Rds in reply. (Common ??? shell)

(Probably should have put this in handwriting help, but it was riveting, too...)
Common shell means normal high explosive as opposed to armour piercing, illuminating, incendiary, common pointed etc. Wiki has a good article here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_British_ordnance_terms
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on December 07, 2011, 12:04:37 am
Thanks, Gixernutter! 
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: heffkit on December 07, 2011, 12:38:33 am
HMS Astraea, Simonstown, 4 Jan 14 (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-34351/ADM53-34351-138_0.jpg)

'9.15 Ship's company medically examined.'

(http://i1000.photobucket.com/albums/af129/heffkit/Astraea140103-medexamined.png)


The mind boggles - I bet the MO was checking for 'self-inflicted recreational medical problems'!  :o
Anybody else come across similar aboard other ships?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on December 07, 2011, 01:48:38 am
[
'9.15 Ship's company medically examined.'

The mind boggles - I bet the MO was checking for 'self-inflicted recreational medical problems'!  :o
Anybody else come across similar aboard other ships?

You mean they may have suffered an injury from an encounter with a German motorcycle or small car - NSU?

Yep. I had one of those; a report of medical exam, I mean. Not an unfortunate encounter. 
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: heffkit on December 07, 2011, 12:05:03 pm
I think we understand each other, Bunts... ;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on December 07, 2011, 12:12:07 pm
I think we understand each other, Bunts... ;)
"Little pink pills and a wire brush? Thanks, Doc."
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: lollia paolina on December 07, 2011, 02:10:28 pm
HMS Thistle, December 12th, 1919:

10.30 Lecture on Hygene by doctor

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-62919/ADM%2053-62919-008_0.jpg

:)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: szukacz on December 07, 2011, 09:50:56 pm
HMS Warspite
9.00 Regatta started  8)

We have a race fan.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: jennfurr on December 08, 2011, 04:28:07 am
3pm - C De Silva reported on board by authority of RNO  for passage to Bombay

9:30pm - C De Silva placed under arrest for unruly conduct.


Now that's a fine bit of work!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on December 08, 2011, 10:22:52 am
3pm - C De Silva reported on board by authority of RNO  for passage to Bombay

9:30pm - C De Silva placed under arrest for unruly conduct.


Now that's a fine bit of work!

Um, which ship was C De Silva on?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: jennfurr on December 08, 2011, 01:45:08 pm
sorry!

Trent

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-63497/ADM%2053-63497-009_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Gixernutter on December 08, 2011, 06:44:17 pm
3pm - C De Silva reported on board by authority of RNO  for passage to Bombay

9:30pm - C De Silva placed under arrest for unruly conduct.


Now that's a fine bit of work!
By chance do you think that he didn't want to go to Bombay?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on December 08, 2011, 06:46:53 pm
3pm - C De Silva reported on board by authority of RNO  for passage to Bombay

9:30pm - C De Silva placed under arrest for unruly conduct.


Now that's a fine bit of work!
By chance do you think that he didn't want to go to Bombay?

I think they got fed up with the continual "Are we nearly there yet?"
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on December 08, 2011, 09:23:59 pm
Royal visitor to Harwich:  HMS Canterbury, 26th February 1918.

9am  Landed every available man for Review by HM the King
1pm  Manned ship
3pm  Manned ship.  Cheered HM the King on passing.

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-36986/0016_0.jpg

Probably the most exciting day for a long time - so far the highlight of the log has been sailing from Chatham to Harwich!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on December 08, 2011, 11:12:10 pm
It's the midnight watch change on HMS Barham at Portland, and the air pressure has just ventured up to 36.35.  Could this be defined as oppressive weather?

Cheers,
Steeleye
 ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on December 08, 2011, 11:47:02 pm
In early November 1920, about the only event of note on HMS Barham (apart from the somewhat oppressive weather above) has been a 'London Party' going ashore most days to drill.  On 10 November, the log notes "0645 London Party and mourners left ship for London".  Does anyone know of a notable who of his/her branch in early November 1920?

On further thought ... probably they were going to London for the 2nd anniversary of Armistice Day.

Cheers,
Steeleye
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on December 08, 2011, 11:59:27 pm
It's the midnight watch change on HMS Barham at Portland, and the air pressure has just ventured up to 36.35.  Could this be defined as oppressive weather?

Cheers,
Steeleye
 ;D

It could be regarded as time to send for a technician or an optician.
Highest recorded in UK (1900-49) was 1053.6 mbar (31.113") Aberdeen 1902:
http://booty.org.uk/booty.weather/climate/1900_1949.htm
Elsewhere:
"Highest air pressure ever recorded: 1085.6 mb (32.06 inHg); Tosontsengel, Kh?vsg?l Province, Mongolia, December 19, 2001.[123] This is the equivalent sea-level pressure; Tosontsengel is located at 1,300 metres (4,300 ft) above sea level."
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_weather_records#Other_categories
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on December 09, 2011, 12:13:15 am
Interesting, bunts.  Also interesting to try to find records for lowest recorded air pressure, which isn't referred to on Wikipedia - possibly because barometers tend to break in hurricanes/typhoons/cyclones.  A quick google search gave me 933 hPa (27.55") for a cyclone off north Queensland in 1918.  The lowest I've come across yet in the logs was 29.03 in the North Atlantic on the Carnarvon, which I thought was getting pretty low.

Nasty weather in Scotland over night; not a good time to be at sea.  I wonder what the pressure got down to?

Cheers.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on December 09, 2011, 12:23:09 am
In early November 1920, about the only event of note on HMS Barham (apart from the somewhat oppressive weather above) has been a 'London Party' going ashore most days to drill.  On 10 November, the log notes "0645 London Party and mourners left ship for London".  Does anyone know of a notable who of his/her branch in early November 1920?

On further thought ... probably they were going to London for the 2nd anniversary of Armistice Day.

Cheers,
Steeleye

That was the year that the permanent Cenotaph was erected:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/remembrance/how/cenotaph.shtml
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on December 09, 2011, 12:38:09 am
Interesting, bunts.  Also interesting to try to find records for lowest recorded air pressure, which isn't referred to on Wikipedia - possibly because barometers tend to break in hurricanes/typhoons/cyclones.  A quick google search gave me 933 hPa (27.55") for a cyclone off north Queensland in 1918.  The lowest I've come across yet in the logs was 29.03 in the North Atlantic on the Carnarvon, which I thought was getting pretty low.

Nasty weather in Scotland over night; not a good time to be at sea.  I wonder what the pressure got down to?

Cheers.
The earliest I could find was 1800 on 8th Dec. That was 960 off Aberdeen. Presumably it was lower during the day.
http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/weather/uk/uk_latest_pressure.html
If Philip, or someone else who knows about these things, is around we may become better informed.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on December 09, 2011, 01:39:25 am
It's all happening on the Barham this morning ... actually on the Barham on 18 November, 1920:
'0830 Landed 10 officers and 90 men to compete in Cross Country race for Arbuthnot Trophy.'

Ne mention of how successful they were - probably safe to assume that they didn't win anything (but it's all about the competition, isn't it - just like 'collecting' OW weather obs). I also wonder how the 10 + 90 were selected, as the opportunities for cross country training on a battleship would be somewhat limited.  The Arbuthnot Trophy is named for Sir Robert Arbuthnot, who met his end at Jutland (see  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sir_Robert_Arbuthnot,_4th_Baronet (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sir_Robert_Arbuthnot,_4th_Baronet) ).  An interesting character, but I'm not sure I would have been too enthused about serving under him.

Cheers
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on December 09, 2011, 01:57:59 am
It really is all go on the Barham in November 1920.  From the log for 20 November:
'Race for Rodman Cup took place.  Cutters 2 miles.'

The Rodman Cup was presented by Admiral Rodman USN, who commanded the US battle squadron that served with the Grand Fleet in WW1.  It is a cutter race open to all ships in the fleet and is competed for annually.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on December 09, 2011, 02:08:49 am
Raven II log, 1917, Colombo to the Maldives: http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-57314/ADM%2053-57314-038_1.jpg

5.53 Hove up & full ah searching for Plane which failed to return from Ani Atoll

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on December 09, 2011, 04:07:16 am
Raven II log, 1917, Colombo to the Maldives: http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-57314/ADM%2053-57314-038_1.jpg

5.53 Hove up & full ah searching for Plane which failed to return from Ani Atoll

They never found the plane, but both crewmen showed up 2 weeks later:
Because they were not on the casualty list on Naval-History.net, I went fishing ahead on the logs.  On the 6th May 1917, there is this note:
Quote
Flgt. Sub. Lieut. Smith & Lieut Mead RNVR previously reported lost, returned on board from Maldive Is.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-57314/ADM%2053-57314-053_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on December 09, 2011, 06:14:35 am
More from November 1920 on the Barham:

'Natives of Scotland, Ireland and Channel Isles proceeded on long leave.'

This is a new one on me; does it mean that they get extra time to get home over the rest of the crew?

Cheers,
Steeleye
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on December 09, 2011, 07:29:20 am
It's been seen before, and yes it was done.  Something about respecting how much more important it is when the men are that close to home, and trusting the men to do better at staying out of trouble when with their families.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: studentforever on December 09, 2011, 09:02:02 am
I was talking to a bloke who was ex-RN while I was on holiday on the Mull of Kintyre and he said that leave was extended by at least a day for those who lived north of a particular line and he didn't get it because he lived in Campbeltown but had to travel north of the line to get home.  I think he also said that those living in the outer Hebrides and Northern Isles got even more.  I think the idea was to provide a more equal 'time at home' rather than 'time off ship'. (The Mull of Kintyre is that long peninsula dropping down on the west of the Firth of Clyde.)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on December 09, 2011, 10:11:10 am
Thanks, professional student,

I didn't make a note of when the 'Natives of Scotland etc' went on their 'long leave', but it was at least a few days before the port watch went on their two weeks long leave (16-30 December).  While there was a log mention of the port watch returning from their leave, there has been no mention of the 'Natives' returning.  Suspicious!  I wonder if they are still holed up on the Mull of Kintyre, sampling the well-known liquid refreshment of those parts.

On another note, while there was a number of riveting entries for the Barham in November 1920, December was a little different, and can be summarised as follows:
     Number of log pages:     31
     Number of weather obs   0

Somewhat less than riveting, although there was a note that a 'Beef Party landed' on three separate occasions.  A quick web search did not help, although I found reference to a Beef Party on HMAS Hobart.  Is there anyone out there in OWland with knowledge of this esoteric event?

Cheers,
Steeleye
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on December 09, 2011, 11:07:15 am
HMS Raven II 21 April 1917 Indian Ocean

"4.4 out plane
5.53 Searching for plane that failed to return from Ani Atoll
Flgt Lt Smith age 22; Lt Mead RNVR age 29 believed drowned
One Lee Enfield Rifle & one Webley Revolver NH stores lost in plane 8018
11.55 a/c 53?W Additional lookouts placed  S.Light used all night "

22 April 1917 similar location

"3.11 Sighted oily patch & biscuit"

I found them - alive.
Because they were not on the casualty list on Naval-History.net, I went fishing ahead on the logs.  On the 6th May 1917, there is this note:
Quote
Flgt. Sub. Lieut. Smith & Lieut Mead RNVR previously reported lost, returned on board from Maldive Is.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-57314/ADM%2053-57314-053_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on December 09, 2011, 11:48:05 am
a Beef Party (there was one on the Aphis or Thistle - they are starting to blend together!  :o ) went ashore to get meat for the ship, as opposed to taking say live creatures on board - The Thistle took on 15 live sheep one day  :P.  I would imagine they got sides of beef and it would take several men to bring it all on board.

Kathy
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: studentforever on December 09, 2011, 01:40:17 pm
Ben-My-Chree has had visits from a 'Beef Boat', presumably a lighter with supplies from the local butcher. Did the Navy use freezers in WWI or did the long-life meat have to be dried or salted as in the olden days?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on December 09, 2011, 02:12:11 pm
There were freezer boats - one was named the Frozen Orange Peel - they were a part of the Royal Fleet Axillary.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: studentforever on December 09, 2011, 02:38:25 pm
What a fantastic name even if I'd hate to have had it on my cap band!  It should have improved the catering though having the option of frozen meat.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on December 10, 2011, 01:48:38 am
Ben-My-Chree has had visits from a 'Beef Boat', presumably a lighter with supplies from the local butcher. Did the Navy use freezers in WWI or did the long-life meat have to be dried or salted as in the olden days?

I made captain of the HMS Torch - one of our doubled-up ships (2 ships' logs with the same name.)  The older Torch was a 3 masted 19th century sloop, retired from active service at the start of the war because she was simply too old and slow.  She was sold after the war to a freight company who used her to experiment with turning her hold into a meat freezer that could make the long trip from New Zealand to England, arriving with the meat in healthier shape than some English beef being sold in the same market.  But more temporary frozen storage was in place for a few decades at that point. 
http://forum.oldweather.org/index.php?topic=1206.msg13589#msg13589
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Gixernutter on December 10, 2011, 10:13:46 am
HMS Barham, Greenock, 31st May 1921, "Hands make & mend clothes, being 5th anniversary of The Battle of Jutland."

Barham was there, so I guess it's a significant moment as she was hit a number of times, so would have suffered casualties.

See: https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-70949/0126_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on December 10, 2011, 12:16:09 pm
Caledon, that was all your fault!!!

From the log of HMS Galatea August 1917 in the north sea.
12 0 Caledon a/c 16 pts to Port without signal.
12 3 Hard a Port. Stop starb.
12 31/2 Collision observed between Nos 2 & 3 destroyers in Port Line (Oreole (?) & Patriot)


https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-42346/0011_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: LupusUK on December 10, 2011, 12:46:55 pm
HMS Barham, Greenock, 31st May 1921, "Hands make & mend clothes, being 5th anniversary of The Battle of Jutland."

Barham was there, so I guess it's a significant moment as she was hit a number of times, so would have suffered casualties.

See: https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-70949/0126_0.jpg

http://www.hmsbarham.com/ship/diary.php
This site lists 26 killed and 37 wounded at the Battle of Jutland
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Gixernutter on December 10, 2011, 06:45:37 pm
HMS Barham, Greenock, 6th June 1921; log shows an entry "1800 Optional Bathing." I know 1800 refers to the time (6 pm), but never knew bathing was optional! Mind you, the sea temp was a tad brisk at 54F!

See: https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-70949/0129_0.jpg

Edited date - 6th, not 7th!  ::)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on December 10, 2011, 07:06:15 pm
Caledon, that was all your fault!!!

From the log of HMS Galatea August 1917 in the north sea.
12 0 Caledon a/c 16 pts to Port without signal.
12 3 Hard a Port. Stop starb.
12 31/2 Collision observed between Nos 2 & 3 destroyers in Port Line (Oreole (?) & Patriot)


https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-42346/0011_0.jpg

I checked at http://www.battleships-cruisers.co.uk/destroyers_before_1900.htm, and found two candidates for the destroyer colliding with Patriot:

Oracle (the most likely) and Oreste.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on December 10, 2011, 07:25:09 pm
Caledon, that was all your fault!!!

From the log of HMS Galatea August 1917 in the north sea.
12 0 Caledon a/c 16 pts to Port without signal.
12 3 Hard a Port. Stop starb.
12 31/2 Collision observed between Nos 2 & 3 destroyers in Port Line (Oreole (?) & Patriot)


https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-42346/0011_0.jpg

I checked at http://www.battleships-cruisers.co.uk/destroyers_before_1900.htm, and found two candidates for the destroyer colliding with Patriot:

Oracle (the most likely) and Oreste.
This cropped up quite recently with HMS Oriole seeming a candidate:
http://forum.oldweather.org/index.php?topic=1454.msg31899#msg31899 (et seq with personal connection.)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on December 10, 2011, 07:27:02 pm
Greetings Tegwen & H.K,

Blowing the writing way up in Powerpoint makes it look very much like 'Oriole' (the spelling in the bible I use (Le Fleming,'Warships of World War 1')).

Cheers
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on December 10, 2011, 07:38:04 pm
I checked the link you gave Bunts and the page discussed is the same as the one Tegwen posted.

Hello Steeleye

Nice job.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on December 10, 2011, 10:49:36 pm
Yep.
I was trying to provide a lead into PeteB9's
It's Oriole - a repeat M class destroyer built in 1916 - my Grand dad (a leading stoker) would have been on board her in 1917

which follows.  ;)
Title: Season's Greetings (1915)!
Post by: heffkit on December 11, 2011, 12:18:42 am
HMS Astraea, 17 Jan 15 (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-34352/ADM53-34352-150_0.jpg)

(http://i1000.photobucket.com/albums/af129/heffkit/Astraea150117-Xmascards.png)


We've had a couple posted before, on 1 Jan (Caesar, 1915 (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-36573/ADM%2053-36573-004_1.jpg)) and 17 Feb (Carnarvon same year (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-37094/ADM53-37094-128_1.jpg))

That reminds me...  :-[
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on December 11, 2011, 11:38:18 pm
Raven II's logs, 1917 (~12 November): http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-57316/ADM%2053-57316-069_1.jpg

S/S Kabinga while leaving berth drove down on ship badly holeing Port cutter & carrying away about half the rails on Foxcle pt side
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Geoff on December 12, 2011, 08:12:33 am
Not sure what's going on here! I'm on HMS Valiant in March 1920 somewhere in the Mediterranean and at 2:24 am we have:
"Destroyers attacked Battle Fleet"

Then at 10am: "Opened fire with 15in guns?"

There was also a submarine attack at 4pm

This must be exercises I suppose as the war ended in 1918.

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-88602/0010_1.jpg (https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-88602/0010_1.jpg)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on December 12, 2011, 10:06:38 am
Probably getting a bit of revenge for some misdemeanor committed on the football pitch at the last inter-ship 'friendly'.  ("Oops, sorry ... is it bleeding much?")

 :-[
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Gixernutter on December 13, 2011, 12:11:33 am
HMS Warspite log entry of 17th August 1921, whilst in Devonport  (Plymouth) has an observed weather condition of 'ps' for noon. As temps are in 60sF and we are in August, I doubt this is accurate! My best guess is the log-keeper wrote 's' instead of 'c' (dyslexia rules KO?).

See:- https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-91693/0120_0.jpg

Or is it a valid recording and the snow pictogram is incorrect? You thoughts and comments are eagerly awaited!  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on December 13, 2011, 02:40:57 am
"p" is "passing showers" so I'm guessing he included the "showers" in his abbreviation.  Transcribe it as written, as he has very clear handwriting.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Gixernutter on December 13, 2011, 07:35:57 pm
Thanks Janet, I shall obey the last order given!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: jennfurr on December 14, 2011, 04:42:25 am
How about 180 degrees from "Riveting"??? 

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-47266/0003_0.jpg

ooooooooh the excitement!

...and it's gone on for at least a week.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Randi on December 14, 2011, 07:03:38 am
 ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on December 14, 2011, 12:29:00 pm
wow, my heart is pounding with excitement!  :P
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on December 14, 2011, 12:33:05 pm
That has to be a new category of prize!  Perhaps the 'Does anything happen at sea' prize?   :D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: jil on December 14, 2011, 04:39:08 pm
Not sure what they are getting upto on HMS Ben-My-Chree  :o

Any ideas? I don't think I want to search on google!

Link to page in case I've done the attachment wrong - entry at 1.45 pm

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-35181/0015_1.jpg

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on December 14, 2011, 04:46:15 pm
Not sure what they are getting upto on HMS Ben-My-Chree  :o

Any ideas? I don't think I want to search on google!

Link to page in case I've done the attachment wrong - entry at 1.45 pm

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-35181/0015_1.jpg

I was wondering whether it was a party to do something with an airstrip, but as far as I can see from the log page what they have is a seaplane, which seemed to rule that one out.
I hope someone knows - I'm with you on not wanting to put that into google!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on December 14, 2011, 04:54:23 pm
Not sure what they are getting upto on HMS Ben-My-Chree  :o

Any ideas? I don't think I want to search on google!

Link to page in case I've done the attachment wrong - entry at 1.45 pm

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-35181/0015_1.jpg

I was wondering whether it was a party to do something with an airstrip, but as far as I can see from the log page what they have is a seaplane, which seemed to rule that one out.
I hope someone knows - I'm with you on not wanting to put that into google!
Probably a good decision.
I see she's at Rabbit Island. There's bound to be some Bunny Girls around.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on December 15, 2011, 02:48:07 am
Not sure what they are getting upto on HMS Ben-My-Chree  :o

Any ideas? I don't think I want to search on google!

Link to page in case I've done the attachment wrong - entry at 1.45 pm

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-35181/0015_1.jpg

I was wondering whether it was a party to do something with an airstrip, but as far as I can see from the log page what they have is a seaplane, which seemed to rule that one out.
I hope someone knows - I'm with you on not wanting to put that into google!
Probably a good decision.
I see she's at Rabbit Island. There's bound to be some Bunny Girls around.

I agree about googling - all common words, we'd never sort it out.  Could they have been turning a field into some kind of air strip for landing?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on December 16, 2011, 04:12:35 am
From Canterbury -

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-36993/0006_0.jpg

Typical British understatement!  :o  Please see the 8:00am entry -

Kathy
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: lollia paolina on December 16, 2011, 10:06:21 am
HMS Blenheim Oct 6th, 1914: Navigating Officer was not sure of what he was reading :)

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-35573/0082_0.jpg

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on December 16, 2011, 01:15:53 pm
From Canterbury -

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-36993/0006_0.jpg

Typical British understatement!  :o  Please see the 8:00am entry -

Kathy

So if I understand this page correctly, they're altering course every few minutes to "avoid the hostile aircraft" and the log keeper kept track of all the course changes?!?  Talk about keeping a cool head while under fire...   :o
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on December 16, 2011, 01:18:29 pm
I know - the part that cracks me up tho, is that there is no description of shots fired, etc., AND it is not until the middle of the morning that you get a explanation for all the course changes.  It is just a/c a/c a/c BOOM Engaged Enemy Aircraft then back to a/c a/c....just makes me laugh  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Danny252 on December 16, 2011, 10:03:51 pm
From Canterbury -

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-36993/0006_0.jpg

Typical British understatement!  :o  Please see the 8:00am entry -

Kathy

So if I understand this page correctly, they're altering course every few minutes to "avoid the hostile aircraft" and the log keeper kept track of all the course changes?!?  Talk about keeping a cool head while under fire...   :o

He does that all the time, actually. Even on training runs it's a course change every half hour/hour.

Ben-My-Chree's crew apparently got some time ashore for a football match (1.15pm)! No mention of results, though. Then, 2 days later, an evening concert is held on board - you'd never guess there was a war on.
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-35184/0006_1.jpg
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-35184/0007_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: tastiger on December 16, 2011, 10:37:32 pm
HMS Barham, August 10th, 1921

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-70949/0161_1.jpg

2200: Warrant officers held dance on Qualet Deck
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Danny252 on December 17, 2011, 09:34:38 pm
HMS Ben-My-Chree 7th Dec 1915

From what I can make out, the ship was attacked by hostile aircraft and took some damage:
9.31 G Qs (General Quarters?) F Qrs
9.37 Heave round fire main
9.41 Cease fire
9.41 Repel hostile aircraft
9.58 Abandon Ship
10.10 Prepare to be taken in tow
10.36 Away all boats crews
10.54 ~ fire engine, after ~
11.27 Secure
11.30 Let go port anchor and weigh by hand

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-35186/0006_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: heffkit on December 18, 2011, 03:44:33 am
HMS Barham, August 10th, 1921

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-70949/0161_1.jpg

2200: Warrant officers held dance on Qualet Deck
What is a 'Qualet' deck?
I thought it should be 'Quarter' deck, but agree it looks more like 'Qualet' - or possibly 'Quater' :)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on December 18, 2011, 05:30:11 am
I think definitely "Quater" - as in 'drifter' and 'warrant', he has the typical habit of trailing crosses on his t's.  But he's forgotten how to spell.  (What were they drinking during this unusual dance?) ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: jil on December 20, 2011, 09:07:44 pm
Ben-my-Chree appears to have a Wolseley car on board! 1.40 pm entry. Earlier in the day they also had a Gnome engine delivered (and it is 1st June not April  ;D)

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-35191/0003_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on December 21, 2011, 12:05:42 pm
Ben-my-Chree appears to have a Wolseley car on board! 1.40 pm entry. Earlier in the day they also had a Gnome engine delivered (and it is 1st June not April  ;D)

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-35191/0003_1.jpg

Hi

This rang a bell with me so I did some searching. In fact I think that bell must have been wrong, but I did find this, which contains some useful history relating to Ben-my-Chree, including her role in the Turkish attack on Perim in 1916.

http://www.oca.269squadron.btinternet.co.uk/history/squadron_history/269_chronicle_pt1_narrative.pdf

Hope it is of interest to all of her crew. Sorry if you have all seen it already.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on December 21, 2011, 01:14:25 pm
Mine Spotting!!!

Just one page from HMS Galatea to indicate how dangerous shipping was in 1918.

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-42346/0162_0.jpg

She is coming back towards Rosyth from close to the Danish Coast and in one day she spots 4 mines of 3 different types. One German and two British.

See the entries for 06.25 and 3.52, 4.34 and 5.15 am

How a ship was supposed to proceed at night in that type of sea is beyond me.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on December 21, 2011, 03:58:48 pm
Mine Spotting!!!

Just one page from HMS Galatea to indicate how dangerous shipping was in 1918.

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-42346/0162_0.jpg

She is coming back towards Rosyth from close to the Danish Coast and in one day she spots 4 mines of 3 different types. One German and two British.

See the entries for 06.25 and 3.52, 4.34 and 5.15 am

How a ship was supposed to proceed at night in that type of sea is beyond me.

Not devised for this particular circumstance, but the phrase "Navigating by Guess and by God" seems appropriate.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: jil on December 21, 2011, 05:39:38 pm
Ben-my-Chree appears to have a Wolseley car on board! 1.40 pm entry. Earlier in the day they also had a Gnome engine delivered (and it is 1st June not April  ;D)

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-35191/0003_1.jpg

Hi

This rang a bell with me so I did some searching. In fact I think that bell must have been wrong, but I did find this, which contains some useful history relating to Ben-my-Chree, including her role in the Turkish attack on Perim in 1916.

http://www.oca.269squadron.btinternet.co.uk/history/squadron_history/269_chronicle_pt1_narrative.pdf

Hope it is of interest to all of her crew. Sorry if you have all seen it already.
Tegwen,
Great link, I've only had a quick look through so far but it looks really interesting. Spotted some familiar names and getting a bit of background of what was actually going on when all they mention in the log is that they hoisted some seaplanes out and then back in again.
Thanks!!!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Danny252 on December 22, 2011, 02:33:21 am
21 Nov 1916: Port Mudros is bombed by enemy seaplanes. Ark Royal's account:

9:40 Two hostile seaplanes appeared from E'ward. A.A. Guns on port side opened fire. Enemy dropped bombs and retired; Schneider from No. 2 tent (pilot Sub Lt Brandon) pursuing and engaging. Damage by enemy bombs; nil; damage to enemy unknown

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-34100/0067_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on December 22, 2011, 03:49:05 am
21 Nov 1916: Port Mudros is bombed by enemy seaplanes. Ark Royal's account:

9:40 Two hostile seaplanes appeared from E'ward. A.A. Guns on port side opened fire. Enemy dropped bombs and retired; Schneider from No. 2 tent (pilot Sub Lt Brandon) pursuing and engaging. Damage by enemy bombs; nil; damage to enemy unknown

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-34100/0067_1.jpg

Just out of interest, what browser are you using? The reason I ask (I use XP & Firefox) is that HMS Ark Royal pages appear "washed out" and tricky to read. I checked that page using Chrome and the writing really is much easier to read.
Note to others If your pages have pale writing, give Chrome a go. Generally, I prefer F/fox but not for this circumstance.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on December 22, 2011, 04:27:10 am
Bunts: I just re-installed chrome and had a look at some Grafton pages that I have been transcribing in the past few days and which were so washed out that I  was spending endless hours snipping/powerpointing/stretching etc.  I've just looked at the same pages using chrome and it's like there's a whole new world out there.  The difference is amazing!

I'll post your findings on the Grafton help desk forum page (ships, battles and people) - appropriately acknowledged!  You may just be responsible for preserving a lot of sanity among the crew.

Cheers,
Steeleye
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Danny252 on December 22, 2011, 04:24:01 pm
Just out of interest, what browser are you using? The reason I ask (I use XP & Firefox) is that HMS Ark Royal pages appear "washed out" and tricky to read. I checked that page using Chrome and the writing really is much easier to read.
Note to others If your pages have pale writing, give Chrome a go. Generally, I prefer F/fox but not for this circumstance.

I'm using Firefox, and whilst it's washed out, it's still legible for me. On occasion I have to move the weather "dots" out of the way to read numbers, but I've done so many pages on A.R. that I know his (or their, I've seen the style change subtly on occasion) handwriting inside out!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on December 22, 2011, 11:12:19 pm
From the log of HMS Grafton, 10 October 1917:

    Hoisted Eqyptian Ensign half mast. Fired salute 21 minute guns

Reason for the flag half-masting and salute was the funeral of Hussein Kemal, First Sultan of Egypt on that day
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: jennfurr on December 23, 2011, 02:06:29 pm
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-47268/0022_0.jpg

On Lord Minto,

(added punctuation for the forum posting to make it easier to read - he tends to misspell words regularly, use odd capitalization, and not use any punctuation in his sentences)

"Took over Escort [of] Unca from Glenesk bound West. Unca steamed away & left us out of sight I kept blowing M.F. but he would not take any notice.  Gave up the chase and return to station of patrol."

I know M.F. isn't what I'm thinking (mental Mondegreen?) but I'm laughing about my version - sounding "hey you mother f----- get back here!" and they just blow him off.

...also note at 10.20 and 10.50 how he write his lower-case p's.  his m's are similarly written with no attaching "hump" at the top.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: tastiger on December 25, 2011, 06:48:04 pm
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-62838/0016_0.jpg

11:23 PM: Felt and heard a report as of an explosion

HMS Theseus 28 June, 1918
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on December 25, 2011, 11:38:58 pm
On board the Isis in September 1914, operating just west of the Isles of Scilly, west of Cornwall.  For the past few weeks, she and her sisters (Doris and Juno ) have been intercepting and checking up to half a dozen cargo ships every day going to/from NW Europe.  At this time, they were presumably trying to round up any ships heading for Germany.  The majority of ships are British, Dutch or French and all are sent on their way except for the Charlois, on passage from New York to Amsterdam.  For some reason, her cargo or papers aroused suspicion and a prize crew was put on board to take her to Plymouth.

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45020/ADM%2053-45020-020_1.jpg (https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45020/ADM%2053-45020-020_1.jpg)

It's possible that this is the Charlois that was sunk by submarine on 19 March 1917.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on December 26, 2011, 12:48:42 am
And another Dutch ship (Niew Amsterdam) gets hauled in by the Isis and a prize crew sent on board.

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45020/ADM%2053-45020-026_1.jpg (https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45020/ADM%2053-45020-026_1.jpg)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: lollia paolina on December 26, 2011, 10:48:13 am
HMS Jessamine, November 29th, 1915:

9.45 Spoke to s/s 'Etonia' (?) of Liverpool who had sent out S.O.S. having mistaken HMS 'Jessamine' for enemy submarine. Ordered her to cancell signal.

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45361/ADM%2053-45361-030_1.jpg

I need help for the name of the ship who had sent out SOS. S/S Etonia is my reading at the moment. :)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on December 26, 2011, 10:52:06 am
Hi Lollia,

I think it's SS Etonian - part of the Leyland line, who operated from Liverpool across the Atlantic.

http://www.theshipslist.com/ships/lines/leyland.html
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: lollia paolina on December 26, 2011, 11:11:21 am
Thank you Helenj! I edited the transcription  :)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on December 26, 2011, 11:34:29 am
The navigation officer on the Isis at the start of the war, who had immaculate, tiny writing, has been replaced by a gentleman whose writing is passable but whose spelling is dreadful.  At the end of every day, I think some kind soul goes through his day's entries and fixes up some of the spelling as there is a lot of crossings-out.  For example, how many people knew that 'Sweedish' ships came from 'Sweeden', or that when approaching another vessel you were 'cloasing' that vessel.  It's so hard not to fix the spelling!  He also has a happy knack of reversing his wet and dry bulb temperature readings.
 :'(
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on December 26, 2011, 12:40:24 pm
That just goes to show how jumpy everyone must have been!  :o
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: LupusUK on December 26, 2011, 05:51:07 pm
HMS Hannibal 1st Jan 1916 in Alexandria

HMS Mallow arrd. with 155 survivors of SS Persia

SS Persia had been torpedoed on 30th Dec
http://www.cix.co.uk/~dliddlea/timeguns/fate-sspersia.html
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Press-ganged by the Swiss Navy on December 26, 2011, 06:52:20 pm
There are several things of note on this page from HMS "Euryalus":

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-41220/ADM%2053-41220-030_0.jpg

1. Kephalo (near the entrance to the Dardanelles) is like Piccadilly Circus in Dec 1915 with all these ships coming and going (which rather slows the transcribing process)
2. At midday 2 hostiles planes flew over, dropped 3 bombs but apparently missed all the ships swarming about
3. I need help with the entry for 7pm  "7.0 sent 1 private R.M.L.I. ashore as Lieut. Bermanh~~~" ??? I can't make up the rest of the name and I don't understand the sentence...did the private get promoted?

S
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on December 26, 2011, 07:02:20 pm
"sent 1 private RMLI ashore as Lieut. Berman's servant(?)"

I'm not sure about the final word.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on December 26, 2011, 10:32:14 pm
Submarine attack on Isis at 0435, 10 November 1914, just outside Queenstown (now Cork), Ireland.  This must have been a popular hunting ground for U boats as the Lusitania was sunk nearby about 6 months later.
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45020/ADM%2053-45020-045_0.jpg (https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45020/ADM%2053-45020-045_0.jpg)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on December 26, 2011, 10:47:37 pm
I feel that I should apologise for my earlier post regarding the new navigation officer on the Isis.  The more logs I transcribe, the more I think he has a serious case of dyslexia (sometimes an 'N' is written backwards).  Also, I suspect that he is very new on the job, as his logs are frequently edited for both spelling and terminology, probably by a more experienced senior.  On the attached page, apart from fixing the spelling, the phrase "ship was placed into dry dock" has been changed to "ship worked into dry dock".  An example of on-the-job training.
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45020/ADM%2053-45020-045_1.jpg (https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45020/ADM%2053-45020-045_1.jpg)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on December 27, 2011, 03:26:27 am
For that, he has very neat handwriting.  I think you are right, those corrections could almost be explained to outsider as someone fixing their own work.  They are simply giving him a remedial writing class on the job.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Press-ganged by the Swiss Navy on December 27, 2011, 09:08:27 am
"sent 1 private RMLI ashore as Lieut. Berman's servant(?)"

I'm not sure about the final word.

Thanks JJ! I like your thinking  ;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on December 27, 2011, 10:39:32 am
Nasty weather on the Isis on Patrol SW of Ireland in December 1914.  Air pressure was down to slightly more than 29" for more than a day, winds of Force 8-10.  On the last day of the storm, 'Winds increased to hurricane force in squalls".  Not a pleasant time to be on the briny!
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45020/ADM%2053-45020-056_0.jpg (https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45020/ADM%2053-45020-056_0.jpg)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Press-ganged by the Swiss Navy on December 27, 2011, 04:21:05 pm
Yaargh....makes m' feel sea-sick just thinkin' about it   :P  (or is that the Xmas grog?)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on December 27, 2011, 07:23:39 pm
No doubt a bit rougher than the Zurichsee gets for the Swiss Navy!
 :)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on December 27, 2011, 09:24:00 pm
HMS Himalaya, 13th August 1916, off the east coast of Africa:

11.00 Received W/T signals of distress from seaplane.
11.5 Observed seaplane & proceeded to her assistance.  ...
0.20 Seaplane onboard.  Weighed anchor
3.5 Seaplane hoisted out & taken to hangar.

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-44356/ADM%2053-44356-078_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on December 28, 2011, 12:55:01 am
HMS Jessamine's log, 9 Nov 1915: https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45361/ADM%2053-45361-020_1.jpg

1.55 a/c West. vessel rolling heavily with high beam (?) sea.

4.00 Boisterous weather continues

10 Nov 1915: https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45361/ADM%2053-45361-021_0.jpg

2.20 a/c S70W.  2/25 a/c N70W 2/45 Boisterous weather continues.
10 am: Bad weather continues.

7 pm: Weather moderating.

Written in the center of the page, where barometric data would be entered: "Mercurial barometer damaged apparently by rolling."   

Oddly enough, there's another barometric reading farther down the page.  Did they have spare barometers on the ships?
Probably should have put this in the Handwriting Help string, but thought they were riveting, too.  If there are other ideas about the word following "high" in the 9 Nov 1915, 1.55 pm entry, I'd love to hear them...

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on December 28, 2011, 01:15:13 am
HMS Jessamine's log, 9 Nov 1915: https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45361/ADM%2053-45361-020_1.jpg

1.55 a/c West. vessel rolling heavily with high beam (?) sea.


It is beam, as in "abeam", ship's side.
Nothing to do with car headlights.
= high sea on ship's beam.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on December 28, 2011, 01:23:42 am
Ah, sailors' shorthand...   Still, I would not have wanted to be onboard the ship, with the "boisterous sea"... :P
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on December 28, 2011, 01:36:39 am
Ah, sailors' shorthand...   Still, I would not have wanted to be onboard the ship, with the "boisterous sea"... :P

It's great fun on a clear night when the ship is pitching and rolling. You can stand at the foot of a mast and watch the masthead describe circles around a convenient star. Then take a walk to the rail on the leeward side ...
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on December 28, 2011, 03:19:05 am
Another torpedo attack reported on the Isis (at 1115) just outside Queenstown.
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45020/ADM%2053-45020-059_0.jpg (https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45020/ADM%2053-45020-059_0.jpg)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on December 28, 2011, 03:38:29 am
More excitement on the Isis in a couple of weeks SW of Ireland than I had in 6 months on the Lancaster off the west coast of South America.  After avoiding a submarine attack outside Queenstown harbour, Isis has run straight back into more feral Atlantic weather.  Air pressures down round 28.6" for a day or so, winds and sea state both around 8 (~50ft seas).

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45020/ADM%2053-45020-059_1.jpg (https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45020/ADM%2053-45020-059_1.jpg)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on December 28, 2011, 05:49:32 am
Friendly fire?  From the log of Isis on the afternoon of 16 December 1914:
"Stopped & spoke SS "Principelles" (Brit) Bristol to Halifax.  This steamer had to be stopped by firing across bows as she paid no attention to signals."

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45020/ADM%2053-45020-062_0.jpg (https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45020/ADM%2053-45020-062_0.jpg)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on December 28, 2011, 05:54:07 am
If I remember my Hornblower stories, that is a warning shot - "if you don't obey my signals, I'll assume you are NOT friendly"
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on December 28, 2011, 06:08:45 am
How about a wake-up call?  Both ships have recently been through several days of appalling weather and I suspect that people were trying to catch up on a bit of sleep!  Possible that the Isis was getting a little tetchy with the SS for their lack of attention.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Press-ganged by the Swiss Navy on December 28, 2011, 07:53:23 am
No doubt a bit rougher than the Zurichsee gets for the Swiss Navy!
 :)

Arrgh, you'll find me swapping the decks of my pre-dreadnought canoe on Lake Constance/Bodensee on my way to raid German shops where stuff is slightly more affordable.
------
meanwhile, another interesting log entry from HMS Euryalus: having got everyone out of Gallipoli, Admiral Sir Rosslyn Wemyss, boards the ship at Malta for a jaunt eastwards -
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-41220/ADM%2053-41220-048_1.jpg

I can't read all the names, if you can help, there is a Major Sawmary?

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on December 28, 2011, 09:28:15 am
Dear Admiral Press-Ganged,

I reckon your "Sawmary" is "Saumarez".  There are references to several "Major Saumarez" in google, including one reference in 1916.  In the line at 2.0, the name is 'Godfrey' and the Captain in the second-last line is 'Yeo'.

Any others?

Cheers
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Press-ganged by the Swiss Navy on December 28, 2011, 04:46:31 pm
Thank yee kindly, Cap'n Steeleye.

The writing has got a bit tricksy since leaving Malta. There is an entry here that at first glance looks like "3 Lady Boys joined ship on Admiral's staff" but on second look I think they they more likely to be Seedy Boys...

The ship also seems to be carrying lots of writers - "2nd writer discharged to 'Prosephine' " and "3rd writer to 'Implacable' " 
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on December 28, 2011, 05:25:45 pm
Sometimes I wish they would write just a bit more.  This is from Himalaya on 24th August 1916:
7.00 Seaplane left
7.35 Received urgent signals from seaplane
7.36 Proceeded in seaplane's direction 48 ?knots
7.50 Engines & courses as req
8.10 Stopped
8.30 Seaplane hoisted aboard

And that's it - so what was the problem?  Had the seaplane come down and needed to be rescued?  Or had he just forgotten his sandwiches?   :D

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-44356/ADM%2053-44356-084_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: PeteB9 on December 28, 2011, 06:21:41 pm
HMS Chatham

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-37562/014_1.jpg (https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-37562/014_1.jpg)


"Mustered by open list, distributed HRH Princess Mary's Xmas gifts"

Fair enough but it's April 23rd. Maybe the post was very slow to Bombay?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: LupusUK on December 28, 2011, 07:54:38 pm
Sometimes I wish they would write just a bit more.  This is from Himalaya on 24th August 1916:
7.00 Seaplane left
7.35 Received urgent signals from seaplane
7.36 Proceeded in seaplane's direction 48 ?knots
7.50 Engines & courses as req
8.10 Stopped
8.30 Seaplane hoisted aboard

And that's it - so what was the problem?  Had the seaplane come down and needed to be rescued?  Or had he just forgotten his sandwiches?   :D

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-44356/ADM%2053-44356-084_0.jpg

7.36 entry should be 48 revs
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on December 28, 2011, 08:35:37 pm
Thanks, Lupus - better eyes than mine!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: GiulioTP on December 28, 2011, 11:58:06 pm
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-37431/010_1.jpg

quite and eventful/terrifying evening
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on December 29, 2011, 01:01:37 am
Sometimes I wish they would write just a bit more.  This is from Himalaya on 24th August 1916:
7.00 Seaplane left
7.35 Received urgent signals from seaplane
7.36 Proceeded in seaplane's direction 48 ?knots
7.50 Engines & courses as req
8.10 Stopped
8.30 Seaplane hoisted aboard

And that's it - so what was the problem?  Had the seaplane come down and needed to be rescued?  Or had he just forgotten his sandwiches?   :D

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-44356/ADM%2053-44356-084_0.jpg

7.36 entry should be 48 revs
Nicely done LupusUK; 48 knots may have been as fast as the plane.  ;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on December 29, 2011, 01:42:42 am
A thoroughly miserable Boxing Day 1914 for the crew of the Isis.  After severe gales and storms (force 9-10) in the weeks leading up to Christmas, a storm late on the 26th peaked at Force 11-12. 

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45020/ADM%2053-45020-067_0.jpg (https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45020/ADM%2053-45020-067_0.jpg)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on December 29, 2011, 01:55:16 am
A thoroughly miserable Boxing Day 1914 for the crew of the Isis.  After severe gales and storms (force 9-10) in the weeks leading up to Christmas, a storm late on the 26th peaked at Force 11-12. 

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45020/ADM%2053-45020-067_0.jpg (https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45020/ADM%2053-45020-067_0.jpg)

That would help the turkey go down or, in my case, come up again.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: LupusUK on December 29, 2011, 08:46:47 am
Thanks, Lupus - better eyes than mine!

Nicely done LupusUK; 48 knots may have been as fast as the plane.  ;)

I can't claim superior eyesight (maybe superior spectacles ;D), more the fact that 48 knots seemed implausibly high and it matched the entry in the revolutions per minute column
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on December 29, 2011, 03:24:32 pm
Thanks, Lupus - better eyes than mine!

Nicely done LupusUK; 48 knots may have been as fast as the plane.  ;)

I can't claim superior eyesight (maybe superior spectacles ;D), more the fact that 48 knots seemed implausibly high and it matched the entry in the revolutions per minute column

Even better than superior eyesight - superior knowledge!   :D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on December 29, 2011, 05:54:41 pm
HMS Himalaya, 18th September 1916.

10.20am Italian refugee & servant embarked.

I'm wondering who might have been important enough to be noted in the log this way ...

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-44356/ADM%2053-44356-099_0.jpg

Well, he didn't hang around for long.  The following day the Italian refugee and his servant were transferred to the Whaler Echo.  It was a busy day; they also discharged 1 prisoner of war to HMS Talbot; and embarked one armourers' crew and one prisoner from Echo.

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-44356/ADM%2053-44356-099_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Press-ganged by the Swiss Navy on December 29, 2011, 06:25:08 pm
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-37431/010_1.jpg

quite and eventful/terrifying evening

yikes! passing around wreckage, mines and then hitting one - ouch!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on December 30, 2011, 12:20:47 am
Jessamine's log, 10 December 1915: https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45361/ADM%2053-45361-038_0.jpg

9.30 1st batch of libertymen returned.
10.40 2nd batch of libertymen returned & whilst dingy was alongside ladder it capsized.  All men reported safe.  dispatched whaler to search for dingy. & land to find 2 absentees.

11 December 1915: https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45361/ADM%2053-45361-038_1.jpg

1.30 Whaler returned to ship, not having recovered dingy.
9.30 Dingy returned in tow of whaler.
10.45 Stopped & received absentee from HMS Primrose.

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on December 30, 2011, 01:19:45 am
How rowdy does a party have to get to do THAT? ;D ::)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on December 30, 2011, 01:42:11 am
I don't recall that verse in "What shall we do with the drunken sailor?"
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Thursday Next on December 30, 2011, 01:08:06 pm
A near miss for the Hildebrand, 2 July 1915:

"Psd object, apparantly a mine, 40 yards on starbd side. Lat 57 46 N. Long 11 18 W"

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-44344/ADM%2053-44344-077_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Press-ganged by the Swiss Navy on December 30, 2011, 03:16:22 pm
Here's one for Star Trek/Shakespeare fans: https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-41220/ADM%2053-41220-093_0.jpg

6.16 Arrived Telegraph ship "Patrick Stewart"

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Randi on December 30, 2011, 03:21:17 pm
Beautiful writing! :'(
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Press-ganged by the Swiss Navy on December 30, 2011, 06:23:57 pm
yes, too good to last though..April was good: https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-41220/ADM%2053-41220-100_0.jpg

May is terrible: https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-41220/ADM%2053-41220-102_1.jpg

- neat? yes, legible?- only just

Any new crew warmly welcomed...it's the most interesting ship I've done so far (or perhaps that's a sign of OW addiction.... :-\)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on December 30, 2011, 08:32:04 pm
HMS Himalaya seems to be a kind of floating supermarket, dodging around the coast of east Africa, delivering food (and sometimes people) to all the other ships.  Mostly it's bread and meat, but today Salamander got a much more varied delivery:
15lbs meat, 40lbs bread, 1 basket oranges, 1 basket vegetables, 1 bag potatoes, 1 bag onions.  Hope they had some good cooks on board ...

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-44356/ADM%2053-44356-130_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on December 30, 2011, 11:24:08 pm
Jessamine's log, 27 December 1915: https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45361/ADM%2053-45361-046_1.jpg

8.00 Fierce Gale & high head sea.  S/S pitching & straining heavily frequent squalls of hurricane force.

revolutions as required to nurse vessel in seaway.

9.45 Huge sea struck vessel breaking adrift sounding machines, smashing funnel to Captains Cabin & other damage.
Ship hove to.  Sounding boom carried away.

6.37 Put about. s/c N78E
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on December 31, 2011, 01:12:02 pm
Here's one for Star Trek/Shakespeare fans: https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-41220/ADM%2053-41220-093_0.jpg

6.16 Arrived Telegraph ship "Patrick Stewart"

What are the odds that she will meet HMS Enterprise?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on December 31, 2011, 03:21:45 pm
they are likely to go through the same wormhole. ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on December 31, 2011, 04:52:13 pm
Would that be a sand-worm hole?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Thursday Next on December 31, 2011, 06:16:09 pm
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-44344/ADM%2053-44344-089_1.jpg

HMS Hildebrand 27 July 1915

We put an armed guard on the SS Trondhjemsfjord with orders to take her in to Kirkwall at 4am.  The Wreck Site says she was torpedoed by U41, and reassuringly adds that there were no casualties.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on January 01, 2012, 09:37:12 am
From the log of the Isis, 23 February 1915:
'Stopped.  Boarded SS 'Drottning Sophie' (Swedish).  Made prisoners of 3 German subjects eligible for military service.'

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45020/ADM%2053-45020-099_1.jpg (https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45020/ADM%2053-45020-099_1.jpg)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Thursday Next on January 01, 2012, 05:23:53 pm
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-44344/ADM%2053-44344-089_1.jpg

HMS Hildebrand 27 July 1915

We put an armed guard on the SS Trondhjemsfjord with orders to take her in to Kirkwall at 4am. The Wreck Site says she was torpedoed by U41, and reassuringly adds that there were no casualties.

This incident is mentioned in "The Big Blockade" (E Keble Chatterton) and the account there goes that the Master of the Trondhjemsfjord lied to the Commanding Officer of the U-boat and did not tell him that they had a British armed guard on board.  Lt Crawford and his men were disguised as crew and evacuated into the boats prior to the U-boat firing a torpedo.  They were all picked up by the Norwegian barque Glance and then transferred to the Swedish SS Orlando.  The armed guard was then transferred to the trawler Princess Juliana and eventually arrived at Thurso.

The wife of the Trondhjemsfjord's Master was travelling with him, and I can't resist quoting the following: "The good wife provided Crawford with some of her husband's clothes, and, by that practised art of dissimulation so natural to her sex, packed the officer's uniform among her own effects preparatory for removal in one of the boats."  Oh well, the book was written in 1932!

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on January 01, 2012, 06:49:17 pm

The wife of the Trondhjemsfjord's Master was travelling with him, and I can't resist quoting the following: "The good wife provided Crawford with some of her husband's clothes, and, by that practised art of dissimulation so natural to her sex, packed the officer's uniform among her own effects preparatory for removal in one of the boats."  Oh well, the book was written in 1932!

And some things never change.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Thursday Next on January 01, 2012, 06:56:38 pm

The wife of the Trondhjemsfjord's Master was travelling with him, and I can't resist quoting the following: "The good wife provided Crawford with some of her husband's clothes, and, by that practised art of dissimulation so natural to her sex, packed the officer's uniform among her own effects preparatory for removal in one of the boats."  Oh well, the book was written in 1932!

And some things never change.

 ::)  ::)  ::)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on January 01, 2012, 06:59:56 pm

The wife of the Trondhjemsfjord's Master was travelling with him, and I can't resist quoting the following: "The good wife provided Crawford with some of her husband's clothes, and, by that practised art of dissimulation so natural to her sex, packed the officer's uniform among her own effects preparatory for removal in one of the boats."  Oh well, the book was written in 1932!

And some things never change.

Well I can see what new year resolution you haven't made ....  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on January 01, 2012, 07:05:12 pm
 ;D ;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Randi on January 01, 2012, 07:16:42 pm
I assume that E Keble Chatterton did not think to ask himself what would have happened if the uniform had been less well hidden and had been found by the Germans....
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on January 02, 2012, 02:20:50 am
... and here's a variation on the interminable paint chipping and cleaning ship - cleaning torpedoes on the Isis:


Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on January 02, 2012, 03:45:56 am
I assume that E Keble Chatterton did not think to ask himself what would have happened if the uniform had been less well hidden and had been found by the Germans....
"Oh, that's my son's. He's been to a fancy dress party."
(Well ... it worked for Prince Harry.)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on January 02, 2012, 09:56:25 am
From the Isis, a Mr Baker ('skipper' - but of what?) joined the ship to  await court-martial.

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45020/ADM%2053-45020-111_0.jpg (https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45020/ADM%2053-45020-111_0.jpg)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on January 02, 2012, 12:18:40 pm
From the Isis, a Mr Baker ('skipper' - but of what?) joined the ship to  await court-martial.

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45020/ADM%2053-45020-111_0.jpg (https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45020/ADM%2053-45020-111_0.jpg)

Queenstown, was one of the bases for the "Q-Ships"
see http://www.archive.org/stream/qshipstheirstory00chatuoft#page/n11/mode/2up by E. Keble Chatterton (the well known champion of equal recognition for women  ;D )
I seem to recall that (some) these ships had "two" crews: some merchant seamen, some R.N.. Could it be that Mr. Barker (note spelling) was the master of such a vessel?
That's my first thought ...
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on January 02, 2012, 12:23:55 pm
or maybe he was a "skipper" as in jumping ship?  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on January 03, 2012, 01:29:13 am
Spelling fixed, Bunts ... that was a very subtle 'r'.

 :-[
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on January 03, 2012, 03:18:06 am
"Subtle"  ???
I must get a copy of your dictionary, where Subtle = Self Important.  ;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on January 03, 2012, 03:28:13 am
You've lost me, Bunts.  'Subtle" (Shorter Oxford), amongst many other meanings, 'tenuous', 'not easily ... perceived', 'fine or delicate, especially to such an extent as to elude observation or analysis'.  The 'r' in 'Barker' cetrainly eluded me on the first reading.
 ???
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Jeff on January 03, 2012, 06:29:24 am
"Caesar" sold some dead men's effects but I haven't seen any notice that any crew members died.

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-36596/0004_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on January 03, 2012, 01:08:56 pm
You've lost me, Bunts.  'Subtle" (Shorter Oxford), amongst many other meanings, 'tenuous', 'not easily ... perceived', 'fine or delicate, especially to such an extent as to elude observation or analysis'.  The 'r' in 'Barker' cetrainly eluded me on the first reading.
 ???
Quite so, Steeleye. It's an accusation seldom made against me; "obvious" and "predictable" are the words Mrs Bunts normally uses.  ;D She mentions others, but they are not suitable for antipodean eyes and ears.  ;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Randi on January 03, 2012, 02:19:35 pm
 :-*
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on January 03, 2012, 06:47:35 pm
Quiite a shopping list on Himalaya - they're at Zanzibar, and record receiving these stores:
9996 lbs flour, 1336 milk, 2990 lbs sugar, 2028 lbs corned beef, 360 lbs rabbit, 200 lbs oat meal, 200 lbs lard, 177 galls rum, 52 galls lime juice, 78 galls vinegar, 504 ~ peas.
Their fridge is going to be absolutely jampacked.

A bit later they also get:
3 c/s ?but and 12 c/o whisky for Wardroom Mess.

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-44356/ADM%2053-44356-164_1.jpg

Can anyone make out what kind of peas they got, and what the Wardroom Mess got 3 cases of?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on January 03, 2012, 06:50:23 pm
I think it says:

 split peas
3 c/s beer
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on January 03, 2012, 06:59:28 pm
Thanks very much, Kathy, they both look convincing; I'll go back and correct my entry.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Thursday Next on January 03, 2012, 07:02:40 pm
What's that about a Computer at 9.20pm?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on January 03, 2012, 07:42:49 pm
 ;D :D  I think that is computed
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on January 03, 2012, 07:54:06 pm
Yes, I think you're right!  Himalaya may have a refrigerator, and a couple of seaplanes, but I don't think its technology is quite as advanced as a computer.  (Actually at the moment it probably only has one seaplane, as the other one crashed and got wrecked - fortunately the crew were picked up and as there's no mention of anyone being discharged to hospital, I can only assume that they were OK).
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on January 04, 2012, 04:12:53 am
From the Isis, 1 May 1915, in Queenstown:
"Starbd watch empld provisioning ship and painting bow-wave."
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45020/ADM%2053-45020-138_1.jpg (https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45020/ADM%2053-45020-138_1.jpg)

False bow-waves seem to have been one of the more common anti-submarine subterfuges employed over the years.  On the worldnavalships.com website there is an amusing photo of HMS Medusa (ex-M29), a monitor with a top-speed of 10 knots when new, with a 'bow-wave' that gives the impression that she's doing 15-20!
 :o
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on January 04, 2012, 04:52:02 am
and that teaches me even one more new thing naval.   ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Randi on January 04, 2012, 07:23:31 am
From the Isis, 1 May 1915, in Queenstown:
"Starbd watch empld provisioning ship and painting bow-wave."
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45020/ADM%2053-45020-138_1.jpg (https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45020/ADM%2053-45020-138_1.jpg)

False bow-waves seem to have been one of the more common anti-submarine subterfuges employed over the years.  On the worldnavalships.com website there is an amusing photo of HMS Medusa (ex-M29), a monitor with a top-speed of 10 knots when new, with a 'bow-wave' that gives the impression that she's doing 15-20!
 :o
8)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: GiulioTP on January 05, 2012, 03:44:51 am
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-34691/0029_1.jpg

10:30 K36 alongside with survivors from SS Euston

apparently sunk due to enemy action
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on January 05, 2012, 05:05:17 am
According to WreckSite.com:

http://www.wrecksite.eu/wreck.aspx?57628
SS Euston [+1917]

SS Euston, built by J. Blumer & Co., Sunderland in 1910 and owned at the time of her loss by Euston SS. Co. Ltd. (E. Thomas Radcliffe & Co.), London, was a British steamer of 2841 tons.
On October 25th, 1917, Euston, on a voyage from Malta to Mudros with a cargo of coal, was sunk by the German submarine UC-34 (Horst Oberm?ller), 37 miles SW from Cape Matapan. 1 person was lost.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Jeff on January 05, 2012, 07:04:30 am
A marriage on board HMS Caesar at 1.30 pm between a sailor and a woman we only know by her name:

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-36596/0012_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on January 05, 2012, 07:12:01 am
From the Isis, 26 May 1915, in Queenstown:
'Hands employed provisioning ship & hoisting in propellor blades.'


Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on January 05, 2012, 02:50:08 pm
A marriage on board HMS Caesar at 1.30 pm between a sailor and a woman we only know by her name:

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-36596/0012_1.jpg
We've had banns of marriage read:
http://forum.oldweather.org/index.php?topic=209.msg28419#msg28419
but I don't recall mention of a marriage, itself, before.
I believe that it was not then permissible for a marriage to be conducted on board a RN ship. As she was in port, it may have been in a local church.
Interesting.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on January 06, 2012, 02:32:15 am
There was also a marriage service performed on HMS Lancaster in Esquimalt (British Columbia) on 2 November 1918 between Lt A.G. Palliser and Miss E Freeman. It's possible that I transcribed this one before I was aware of the 'Riveting' thread.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-46038/ADM%2053-46038-004_0.jpg (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-46038/ADM%2053-46038-004_0.jpg)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on January 06, 2012, 08:21:34 am
I've spent the last few weeks (ship time, that is) on the Isis, based in Bermuda and patrolling north towards Baltimore and New York.  On every patrol there is sharp drop in the sea temperature from the mid 70s to the mid 60s in the space of a few hours when traveling northwards, and vice versa when going south.  A bit of googling shows that Isis appears to be moving in and out of the Gulf Stream (eg http://seacoos.org/Data%20Access%20and%20Mapping/Currents_product_desc/ (http://seacoos.org/Data%20Access%20and%20Mapping/Currents_product_desc/)).  I hadn't realised that the Gulf Stream had such a sharp western boundary.

Nice to know that we can see some real oceanography in our old data!
 ;D ;D ;D


Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: jil on January 07, 2012, 10:06:06 am
HMS Ceres reports that HMS Cassandra struck a mine and sank. The log is for 5th Dec 1918 so it's not got much safer just because the war's over.

According to Wiki 10 men were lost and rest of crew evacuated but Ceres doesn't mention this.

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-37501/004_1.jpg

Checked the next day and found they had HMS Vendetta alongside with 9 officers and 128 men, survivors from Cassandra.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: jil on January 08, 2012, 09:30:15 am
HMS Ceres 30th Dec 1918 firing on a barracks at Riga, Latvia where troops had mutinied. For several days previous to this they had also been sending out armed parties to march through the town.

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-37501/017_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on January 08, 2012, 07:55:41 pm
From HMS Glory, 13 February 1918:
'Mourners for Russian admirals funeral left ship.'
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-43039/ADM%2053-43039-065_1.jpg (https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-43039/ADM%2053-43039-065_1.jpg)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on January 09, 2012, 01:59:19 am
As a change from the more common 'Discharged 2 ratings to hospital', HMS Glory reports:
'Received one cot case from shore.'
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-43039/ADM%2053-43039-077_0.jpg (https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-43039/ADM%2053-43039-077_0.jpg)

Given that this was in Murmansk in the spring, between the Russian Revolution and the Civil War, he was probably much better off on board!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: GiulioTP on January 09, 2012, 07:55:55 pm
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-34692/0017_0.jpg

just over a month later
3:00 "Survivors from SS Jane Radcliffe on board for accomodation"

http://www.wrecksite.eu/wreck.aspx?57629


and just a couple of days later
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-34692/0018_0.jpg

6.30 "27 survivors from portugese steam ship "Tongue" on board for accomodation"
I think the log keeper might be misspelling the name of this ship:
http://www.wrecksite.eu/wreck.aspx?168638

and another wreck

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-34693/0015_0.jpg

7.00 "Received 4 officers, Survivors SS Birkhall"
http://www.wrecksite.eu/wreck.aspx?145159
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on January 10, 2012, 04:23:08 am
On HMS Glory, 3rd April 1918:
"Cautioned Sub Lieut. Thompson, R.N.R. for being down below in his cabin when officer of the watch at 1.15 am on April 3rd."
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-43039/ADM%2053-43039-094_1.jpg (https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-43039/ADM%2053-43039-094_1.jpg)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on January 10, 2012, 04:39:54 pm
I suspect that no one is very happy when Himalaya arrives and docks!  On just one day in Cape Town they record:

Gardiner, domestic, placed under sentry's charge
Givnan ? stoker placed under arrest for breaking ship  (I suspect this means breaking out, rather than breaking it up, but I could be wrong!)
Landed escort for Simonstown to bring back Lambert, Stoker from HMS Minerva
Gardiner, domestic returned to duty (having probably slept it off?)
Gibbons, Stoker RNR, transferred to HMS Mantua for passage to England (he was court martialled about 10 days ago and has been in the cells ever since, so this is probably to be sent to prison)
Escort returned with Stoker Lambert
Landed patrol to arrest Smith domestic
Patrol returned with prisoner

I suspect the local authorities are asking, 'when did you say you were sailing?'

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-44356/ADM%2053-44356-233_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on January 10, 2012, 10:56:29 pm
HMS Glory, 22 April 1918:
'Fire reported in after bread room flat (ventilating fan driving room). Oak~ found smouldering. Secure."
Any suggestions as to what was smouldering?
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-43039/ADM%2053-43039-104_0.jpg (https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-43039/ADM%2053-43039-104_0.jpg)
 ???
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: amamdury on January 10, 2012, 11:04:57 pm
HMS Bacchus
2.0 Discharged torpedo for TB 04~ to Europa's pinnace
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-34684/0018_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on January 11, 2012, 03:17:15 am
HMS Glory, 22 April 1918:
'Fire reported in after bread room flat (ventilating fan driving room). Oak~ found smouldering. Secure."
Any suggestions as to what was smouldering?
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-43039/ADM%2053-43039-104_0.jpg (https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-43039/ADM%2053-43039-104_0.jpg)
 ???
Oakum. It's a tar impregnated fibrous material sometimes made from old rope used for caulking between planking to make joints watertight (although I think "waterproof" is more accurate as it's to repel water rather than contain it; but that's just me.)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on January 11, 2012, 03:23:37 am
HMS Bacchus
2.0 Discharged torpedo for TB 04~ to Europa's pinnace
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-34684/0018_1.jpg

I've considered 0, 6, & 8, there are examples of those, but I think it's 3.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: amamdury on January 11, 2012, 04:16:41 am
Thanks Bunts  :)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CousinJenny on January 11, 2012, 06:11:34 pm
On 21 February 1916 on the Euryalus they're not just cleaning the decks they're holystoning them.  Boy is that ship going to shine!  Mind you, they're preparing for coaling at the same time, so I'm imagining someone going spare a few hours later at the mess being made of their nice clean deck

"I just spent hours holystoning that lot, now look at it!!"  ;D


https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-41220/ADM%2053-41220-066_1.jpg (https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-41220/ADM%2053-41220-066_1.jpg)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: amamdury on January 11, 2012, 07:17:58 pm
Nice mix of holystone & coal and it will be a nice battleship grey, just the job  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Thursday Next on January 11, 2012, 08:24:38 pm
The Wikipedia article on holystoning is quite interesting (for anyone who hasn't already looked it up):
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holystone

particularly the bit about it causing excessive wear on the decks!  :D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: GiulioTP on January 12, 2012, 03:47:15 am
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-34694/0005_1.jpg

7:00 Three survivors from SS Roxburgh sent on board for accomodation by order of SNO

http://www.wrecksite.eu/wreck.aspx?163423
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: ElisabethB on January 13, 2012, 04:31:09 pm
HMS Caesar - Constantinople - 21 Sept. 1919
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-36598/0013_1.jpg

A Civilian brought on board by Military Police found stabbed in Back

Next day : One civilian to hospt
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-36598/0014_0.jpg

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on January 14, 2012, 10:26:18 am
HMS Glory, 21 July 1918:
"Landed ship's tug of war team."

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-43039/ADM%2053-43039-155_1.jpg (https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-43039/ADM%2053-43039-155_1.jpg)

It might be summer, but in Murmansk they were probably pleased with the chance to keep warm.  Or perhaps they were just after a bit of variety - I've been 'on board' since December 1917 and they haven't gone anywhere in 7 months.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on January 14, 2012, 04:52:52 pm
HMS Himalaya, 17th July 1917:

8.30am 1 PO and 20 men landed for recruiting procession.
11.30  Recruiting Party returned.

They're in Cape Town, so I'm not entirely sure who they're trying to recruit.

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-44357/ADM%2053-44357-032_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on January 15, 2012, 01:59:24 am
HMS Himalaya, 17th July 1917:

8.30am 1 PO and 20 men landed for recruiting procession.
11.30  Recruiting Party returned.

They're in Cape Town, so I'm not entirely sure who they're trying to recruit.


South Africa was part of the British Empire and provided many troops for the Western Front. 
"The story of African soldiers in the First World War has received little attention at a popular level until recently. The facts are that both France and Britain drew heavily upon their colonies for manpower during the war. An estimated 500,000 Africans were deployed in the French and British forces; some as labourers, others as fighting soldiers."
http://alshaw.blogspot.com/2007/12/african-soldiers-in-world-war-one.html


"Jan Christiaan Smuts, OM, CH, ED, KC, FRS, PC (24 May 1870 ? 11 September 1950) was a prominent South African and British Commonwealth statesman, military leader and philosopher. In addition to holding various cabinet posts, he served as Prime Minister of the Union of South Africa from 1919 until 1924 and from 1939 until 1948. He served in the First World War and as a British field marshal[1] in the Second World War."
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jan_Smuts
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on January 15, 2012, 07:44:22 am
On HMS Glory, 11 August 1918:
'Lost overboard by Charles Rolls A.B. one goose neck hose connection. Charged 2/2.'

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-43039/ADM%2053-43039-168_1.jpg (https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-43039/ADM%2053-43039-168_1.jpg)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on January 17, 2012, 01:56:08 am
From the log of HMS Glory, 17 October 1918:
'Lieut. W.B. Wood, RNR did not return on board HMS 'Glory' on 16th inst. when ordered to do so by signal.'
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-43039/ADM%2053-43039-204_1.jpg (https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-43039/ADM%2053-43039-204_1.jpg)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Press-ganged by the Swiss Navy on January 17, 2012, 06:02:36 am
Euryalus 23 Sep 1916:

"Dressed ship with masthead flags in honour of the Holy Carpet"

Holy Carpets, Batman! What's this about?  ;D

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-41220/ADM%2053-41220-181_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Jeff on January 17, 2012, 07:12:33 am
Euryalus 23 Sep 1916:

"Dressed ship with masthead flags in honour of the Holy Carpet"

Holy Carpets, Batman! What's this about?  ;D

It's a Muslim pilgrimage: http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=FB0D12FA345813738DDDAA0994D8415B828DF1D3

Note the date of this article.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on January 17, 2012, 08:17:41 am
Can there be a stranger entry than this one from the log of HMS Glory on 31 October 1918 (and subsequent days):
'All hands mustered for gargling.'
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-43039/ADM%2053-43039-211_1.jpg (https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-43039/ADM%2053-43039-211_1.jpg)

People have been succumbing to illness (mainly Spanish flu, one assumes) on a regular basis in the 'Russian Intervention' fleet in Murmansk.  'Gargling' indicates how desperate things were becoming - and only 11 days to the Armistice , with a lot of people not going to get there.

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Press-ganged by the Swiss Navy on January 17, 2012, 06:35:45 pm
Thank's Jeff! I've learned something new today.

Entry from the next day: Dressed ship. Salute of 18 guns in honour of Carpet, being landed from "Hardinge". Flag transferred to "Hardinge"

Euryalus 23 Sep 1916:

"Dressed ship with masthead flags in honour of the Holy Carpet"

Holy Carpets, Batman! What's this about?  ;D

It's a Muslim pilgrimage: http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=FB0D12FA345813738DDDAA0994D8415B828DF1D3

Note the date of this article.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on January 18, 2012, 05:16:35 am
HMS Glory, 24 November 1918:
'R.A. Green presented D.S.M. to Bugler Gutteridge.'
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-43039/ADM%2053-43039-226_0.jpg (https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-43039/ADM%2053-43039-226_0.jpg)

Congratulations, Bugler Gutteridge!
 :)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on January 18, 2012, 06:35:56 am
Not exactly a 'riveting' log entry, but certainly a bit puzzling.  On 8 December 1918 on HMS Glory in Murmansk, the log notes: 'Read articles of war'.  I've not seen reference to their being read on any other ship during my time as an OWer.

Would anyone like to suggest why the articles would have been read at this time?  The armistice occurred almost 4 weeks prior to this reading.  The 'Russian Intervention' is still underway, but things appear to be pretty quiet on the Glory and on the other vessels in the fleet.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Randi on January 18, 2012, 07:38:43 am
I have seen it a few times.
Here is one link: http://forum.oldweather.org/index.php?topic=978.msg9064#msg9064
More:
http://www.hmsrichmond.org/rnarticles.htm - The 1757 version of the "Articles of War" read to the sailors on all of our ships.  The 1884 version does not seem to be digitized, but a listing of the changes made through 1884 (the version our sailors heard) can be found at Legislation concerning...
http://forum.oldweather.org/index.php?topic=1454.msg32522#msg32522 - 1884
http://forum.oldweather.org/index.php?topic=1396.msg14634#msg14634
http://forum.oldweather.org/index.php?topic=1758.msg29853#msg29853
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on January 18, 2012, 09:18:07 am
From the log of HMS Glory, 10 December 1918:
'The following officer has been logged by Capt. G. Hopwood.
Sub. Lieut. C.T. Thompson, RNR disobeyed an order, as officer of the watch, on 7/12/18, given him by the commander, thereby allowing an irregularity to take place, against the ships orders.'

Tantalising! I'd love to know what he did.
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-43039/ADM%2053-43039-236_0.jpg (https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-43039/ADM%2053-43039-236_0.jpg)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: jil on January 18, 2012, 12:23:53 pm
From the log of HMS Glory, 10 December 1918:
'The following officer has been logged by Capt. G. Hopwood.
Sub. Lieut. C.T. Thompson, RNR disobeyed an order, as officer of the watch, on 7/12/18, given him by the commander, thereby allowing an irregularity to take place, against the ships orders.'

Tantalising! I'd love to know what he did.
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-43039/ADM%2053-43039-236_0.jpg (https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-43039/ADM%2053-43039-236_0.jpg)
Unless they've got more than one Sub. Lieut. Thompson on Glory, it's the same guy already reported for being in his cabin when he should have been Officer of the Watch!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on January 18, 2012, 12:27:23 pm
In that case, the man is a complete dill! Or perhaps he's anticipating finishing up in the RN shortly and couldn't give a toss any more.
 ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: shippeb on January 18, 2012, 01:44:19 pm
Not exactly a 'riveting' log entry, but certainly a bit puzzling.  On 8 December 1918 on HMS Glory in Murmansk, the log notes: 'Read articles of war'.  I've not seen reference to their being read on any other ship during my time as an OWer.

Would anyone like to suggest why the articles would have been read at this time?  The armistice occurred almost 4 weeks prior to this reading.  The 'Russian Intervention' is still underway, but things appear to be pretty quiet on the Glory and on the other vessels in the fleet.

Hi Steeleye,

During the Napoleonic era, captains sailing without a chaplain on board (and at the time, many captains appear to have thought chaplains on board were bad luck) could either deliver a sermon of their own on Sunday, or read the Articles of War to essentially remind the crew of what behavior was expected.  Since 8 Dec 1918 was a Sunday, whether or not they had a chaplain on board, I would guess that someone felt it was time to re-read the Articles.

E.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: jil on January 18, 2012, 09:24:30 pm
HMS Implacable 13th May 1915
"Goliath" sunk off Morto Bay by torpedo fire. Sent all boats to assistance of Goliaths crew.

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-44760/ADM%2053-44760-163_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on January 19, 2012, 11:28:50 pm
HMS Isis stopped and boarde the 'triculo' late on 21 October 1915.  Just after midnight she 'Removed one suspicious person from Triculo.'  No word on why the person was suspicious.
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45020/ADM%2053-45020-237_0.jpg (https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45020/ADM%2053-45020-237_0.jpg)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on January 20, 2012, 02:48:10 pm
HMS Isis stopped and boarde the 'triculo' late on 21 October 1915.  Just after midnight she 'Removed one suspicious person from Triculo.'  No word on why the person was suspicious.
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45020/ADM%2053-45020-237_0.jpg (https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45020/ADM%2053-45020-237_0.jpg)

Most likely thought to be 'not one of us' ....
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on January 20, 2012, 03:05:15 pm
HMS Isis stopped and boarde the 'triculo' late on 21 October 1915.  Just after midnight she 'Removed one suspicious person from Triculo.'  No word on why the person was suspicious.
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45020/ADM%2053-45020-237_0.jpg (https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45020/ADM%2053-45020-237_0.jpg)

Most likely thought to be 'not one of us' ....
You mean "one of those people who can't understand English unless you shout at them"?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: CHommel on January 20, 2012, 03:07:58 pm

Most likely thought to be 'not one of us' ....

That phrase reminds me of one of my all time favorite (children's) books:  O'Sullivan Stew.   If you haven't read it, do so.  You're in for a real treat.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: MoonStar005 on January 20, 2012, 06:13:07 pm
On the HMS Isis, I think the 9th or 10th of November 1915, it said "boys at school". Who are they referring to?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on January 20, 2012, 06:20:23 pm
They had some very young crew members then - just pre-war and early in the war boys could join as young as 12 - which wasn't very different to the age at which most people left school and started work.
So the boys would still be being given some education.  I've got the same entry on Himalaya too.
If you put 'boys' into the search box you'll find some earlier queries and answers on the topic.

And welcome to the Forum!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on January 20, 2012, 06:54:06 pm
I think that ship's boys were an offshoot of the ancient apprenticeship idea that functioned as extensive trade schools.  And everyone had to structure them to care for / control young teen-age boys.  It could not have been boring. ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Randi on January 20, 2012, 07:47:13 pm
On Bristol I have often seen things like
"Leave to Watch till 7.0a.m. + to boys till 7.0p.m."
and
"Leave to part of Watch till 7.0 a.m, to men under 20 till 10.0p.m + to boys till 7.0p.m"
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: amamdury on January 20, 2012, 08:41:00 pm
Euryalus
Two armourers crew from Minerva for exam
Painter's mate to Diana for exam
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-41220/ADM%2053-41220-138_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: GiulioTP on January 20, 2012, 09:43:41 pm
19 June 1918
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-34695/0028_0.jpg
10:30 Ship placed under quarantine through epidemic of influenza

11 July 1918
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-34696/0008_1.jpg
8:10 Carpenters from Aquarius came onboard employed building 3 wood houses on deck for hydrophone officers accommodation
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: jil on January 22, 2012, 05:22:46 pm
HMS Empress 11th October 1917 - lost Seaplane

      Flight Comdr Clemson & 2nd Lt Newton in 8021 failed to return reasons unknown

Another seaplane and a French TB had been searching for them

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-40785/0063_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on January 25, 2012, 02:26:25 am
25 Apr.1918 on "Lord Minto" - a very interesting evening:
Second half of https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-47270/0026_0.jpg

7pm Arrived at No.30 buoy Heard firing also Drifter blowing steam whistle about 3 Mls in SE direction. Went up to drifter & found them trying to sink a mine which was awash. Prince Leo & Kate Lewis also closed & fired on it until dark but unable to sink it. I dropped down buoy & reported by W/T then proceeded to night station at 8.40  Expended 1 round 12pds for active sinking mine.
7.30 Received message from French Airship Reporting something suspicious seen Seven miles from us.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: jil on January 25, 2012, 10:04:01 am
HMS Empress 15th April 1918 at Port Said - they sent a fire party to SS Proton but the Proton sank a few hours later

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-40785/0170_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on January 25, 2012, 10:13:34 am
HMS Empress 15th April 1918 at Port Said - they sent a fire party to SS Proton but the Proton sank a few hours later

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-40785/0170_1.jpg

You can read the story of the Proton's fire and the resulting Albert Medal  for Commander Walter Henry Calthrop, R.N. here. It seems as if it was a very good thing that she sank/was sunk!

http://www.naval-history.net/WW1NavyBritishLGDecorationszzAlbertMedal.htm

I am not sure where Com Calthrop came from. Was he the Commander of the Empress?

K

Warning, there are some incredibly harrowing stories if you continue reading that list of citations for medals!

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: jil on January 25, 2012, 02:04:14 pm
HMS Empress 15th April 1918 at Port Said - they sent a fire party to SS Proton but the Proton sank a few hours later

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-40785/0170_1.jpg

You can read the story of the Proton's fire and the resulting Albert Medal  for Commander Walter Henry Calthrop, R.N. here. It seems as if it was a very good thing that she sank/was sunk!

http://www.naval-history.net/WW1NavyBritishLGDecorationszzAlbertMedal.htm

I am not sure where Com Calthrop came from. Was he the Commander of the Empress?

K

Warning, there are some incredibly harrowing stories if you continue reading that list of citations for medals!

Thanks for finding that. It's an amazing story. How can the log keeper of the Empress put "Fire party returned (ship sank)" considering what was actually happening? You can take the British stiff upper lip too far!
I don't think Com Calthrop is from the Empress. The Commander is E.D.Drury if I'm reading the signature correctly from the front of the log books.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on January 25, 2012, 02:15:00 pm
HMS Empress 15th April 1918 at Port Said - they sent a fire party to SS Proton but the Proton sank a few hours later

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-40785/0170_1.jpg

You can read the story of the Proton's fire and the resulting Albert Medal  for Commander Walter Henry Calthrop, R.N. here. It seems as if it was a very good thing that she sank/was sunk!

http://www.naval-history.net/WW1NavyBritishLGDecorationszzAlbertMedal.htm

I am not sure where Com Calthrop came from. Was he the Commander of the Empress?

K

Warning, there are some incredibly harrowing stories if you continue reading that list of citations for medals!

Thanks for finding that. It's an amazing story. How can the log keeper of the Empress put "Fire party returned (ship sank)" considering what was actually happening? You can take the British stiff upper lip too far!
I don't think Com Calthrop is from the Empress. The Commander is E.D.Drury if I'm reading the signature correctly from the front of the log books.
As he was contacted by 'phone, and he knew about the 240 tons of ammunition, it seems that he was shore based.
Sailing a desk isn't without its hazards.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Randi on January 25, 2012, 02:15:51 pm
I wonder if he was the commander of the port - if there is such a thing.
That part about being notified by telephone suggests land to me.

drat - too slow!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on January 25, 2012, 02:31:07 pm
Only because I didn't search for N.T.O.
Naval Transport Officer (?Navy - I didn't find it) seems a possibility. He'd have known the ships' manifests and (intended) destination.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Randi on January 25, 2012, 02:50:11 pm
The person on the phone could have told him the cargo...
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on January 25, 2012, 02:56:38 pm
True.
Although (defending my corner) in the citation he knew rather than was informed.
Pedant? Moi?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Thursday Next on January 25, 2012, 05:21:33 pm

http://www.naval-history.net/WW1NavyBritishLGDecorationszzAlbertMedal.htm

K

Warning, there are some incredibly harrowing stories if you continue reading that list of citations for medals!

Thanks for posting that, Keith.  I was very excited to find that two Startin's had received the Albert Medal.  Unfortunately I am too busy transcribing logs to spend time on researching my family history, so am still ignorant as to whether I am related to them or not!

Su (Startin)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Randi on January 25, 2012, 06:37:07 pm

http://www.naval-history.net/WW1NavyBritishLGDecorationszzAlbertMedal.htm

K

Warning, there are some incredibly harrowing stories if you continue reading that list of citations for medals!

Thanks for posting that, Keith.  I was very excited to find that two Startin's had received the Albert Medal.  Unfortunately I am too busy transcribing logs to spend time on researching my family history, so am still ignorant as to whether I am related to them or not!

Su (Startin)
Copy that to the addiction thread ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: lollia paolina on January 26, 2012, 07:13:49 am
HMS Empress, Seaplane Carrier, September 14th, 1919:

The following awarded Russian Order of St. George (4th Class):

Chief Mechanic D. Roberts 238293 RAF
Chief Mechanic H.A.C. Oland K16200 RAF
Serg.t Smith f.f. 329900 RAF
A.C. II A. Brown 243177 RAF

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-40795/0009_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: jil on January 27, 2012, 03:20:18 pm
HMS Empress 13th November 1918

Seaplanes escorting Allied fleet heading for Constantinople after the Armistice

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-40785/0294_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Thursday Next on January 27, 2012, 04:46:53 pm
HMS Hildebrand, 12 January 1917
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-44345/ADM%2053-44345-135_0.jpg

The wind was force 6/7 and described as very squally.

"Seaman Coleman whilst relieving masthead lookout was washed off foreward house receiving injuries to his back."
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: murphysmate on January 27, 2012, 08:05:49 pm
HMS Hyacinth, 20 May 1916
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-44643/ADM%2053-44643-034_0.jpg

Found HMS Manica on a reef.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on January 28, 2012, 02:53:13 am
And I found Manica's log for that date.  She did not have a happy crew!  Her captain and officers weren't even allowed to stay in command of her crew during the rescue!
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-48166/ADM%2053-48166-013_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on January 28, 2012, 03:02:46 am
Ran over the tow rope, eh?
Which of us hasn't done that?  :-\
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: h.kohler on January 28, 2012, 12:16:43 pm
I remembered having transcribed Challenger's log page for that date. Here it is:

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-37520/ADM53-37520-0032_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on January 28, 2012, 12:23:11 pm
Really fascinating to have all three accounts of this drama - an unexpected bonus of this project and the Forum!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Danny252 on January 28, 2012, 10:57:18 pm
1916 wasn't a good year for ships in East Africa! Himalaya ran aground off Mikindani, 10th Dec 1916. Depending on how you read it, you might think you paid for assistance with a few beef sandwiches!

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-44356/ADM%2053-44356-147_0.jpg

7.19 Entered channel
7.25 Run aground. Sounding 3 1/2 ftms. Full speed ahead.
7.27 Stop. Full speed astern
7.30 Stopped.
8.00 Hands employed laying out kedge anchor on Str Quarter
11.20 Whaler "Echo" anchored close on Port Quarter
12.0 Supplied "Echo" 30lb beef, 50lbs bread, 96 lbs flour
3.3 Used Engines as requisite to refloat ship
3.10 Steam cutter + 1st cutter standing by to pick up kedge anchor
3.30 Ship refloated with aid of Whaler "Echo"
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on January 29, 2012, 07:06:49 am
On HMS Isis, 26 December 1917, in Halifax, Nova Scotia:
'Landed 53 men & 1 lieut. to work about ruins ashore, caused by explosion.'

This was the explosion on 6 December in which the French SS Mont Blanc, carrying ammunition, blew up after colliding with the Norwegian SS Imo.  Approximately 2000 people were killed.  Isis was in Halifax in late November before the explosion and returned again a few days before Christmas.  They were lucky not to be there for the event.

I recall another OWer mentioning the explosion, but I can't remember if their ship was in port at the time.

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45040/ADM%2053-45040-069_0.jpg (https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45040/ADM%2053-45040-069_0.jpg)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Randi on January 29, 2012, 07:14:44 am
Here:
http://forum.oldweather.org/index.php?topic=1858.msg23111#msg23111
http://forum.oldweather.org/index.php?topic=527.msg4517#msg4517
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on January 29, 2012, 10:04:28 am
Hi randi_2, Thanks for the links.  The logs of major events can be quite fascinating - so concise and matter-of-fact, and nothing upsets the routine ('Hands to dinner' a couple of hours after the explosion).  I was transcribing the logs for Grafton when she was torpedoed near Malta.  The event was reported and the damage summarised, and then there was no further mention of it.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on January 30, 2012, 03:20:38 am
An entertaining day for HMS Isis in Hampton Roads.  After having her cable fouled by SS 'Oldbeck' drifting past dragging her anchor, Isis had multiple episodes of anchor dragging herself caused by drifting sludge ice.  While trying to coal, the coaling scow broke adrift ... and so it went on.  Hampton Roads is obviously a tricky place to coal in the depths of winter.
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45040/ADM%2053-45040-077_1.jpg (https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45040/ADM%2053-45040-077_1.jpg)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on January 30, 2012, 10:55:19 am
On convoy duty with HMS Isis in the North Atlantic, 22 January 1918:
'Thunder bolt fell close to port side.'

Five minutes later, the wind dropped suddenly from Force 10 to Force 2, and stayed down for the next several hours.  Bizarre weather.
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45040/ADM%2053-45040-085_0.jpg (https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45040/ADM%2053-45040-085_0.jpg)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Thursday Next on January 30, 2012, 03:17:44 pm
10 March 1917, HMS Hildebrand
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-44345/ADM%2053-44345-169_0.jpg

8.50am  A/c to intercept small boat
9.10  Stopped rescued survivors of British SS Newstead

The Newstead was torpedoed on 3 March 1917 by U49, so the survivors had been waiting a week to be rescued.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Thursday Next on January 30, 2012, 04:13:26 pm
12 March 1917, HMS Hildebrand
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-44345/ADM%2053-44345-170_0.jpg

"Mr G W Thornton James was this day reprimanded by the Captain for that he did on March 10th when on duty as WT operator improperly send the "Urgent Emergency Signal" in direct disregard of the verbal instructions he had received and the printed orders exhibited in the WT Cabinet [signed W Thornton-James WT RNR]"

The second element of the surname is a bit of an enthusiastic guess - I'm reasonably confident about the J and the M, though the 4th letter looks like it could be an A and the 5th could perhaps be an N.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on January 30, 2012, 05:32:30 pm
For once the signature is clearer - it seems fairly clearly 'James' there, though I agree with you that the written version is much less obvious.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: bpb42 on January 30, 2012, 10:28:37 pm
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-40875/ADM%2053-40875-050_1.jpg

HMS Endymion, 17th November 1916, at 'Salonica'

'Sent 1st Lt Clark & guard of Leading Seamen to investigate mutinous conduct of crew of HMS G21'
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: astroboyOW on February 02, 2012, 04:52:17 pm
HMS Ark Royal being fumigated for typhus.  One man has died and several others are in hospital.  Forgive my perspective, but the entry at 4:45 PM is the one that stopped me:

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-34110/0080_0.jpg

Jeff
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on February 02, 2012, 05:28:52 pm
HMS Ark Royal being fumigated for typhus.  One man has died and several others are in hospital.  Forgive my perspective, but the entry at 4:45 PM is the one that stopped me:

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-34110/0080_0.jpg

Jeff

That would definitely have stopped me too ... :(
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on February 02, 2012, 05:55:03 pm
That must have been very hard on the crew  :(  :'(
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Randi on February 02, 2012, 06:27:33 pm
HMS Ark Royal being fumigated for typhus.  One man has died and several others are in hospital.  Forgive my perspective, but the entry at 4:45 PM is the one that stopped me:

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-34110/0080_0.jpg

Jeff

That would definitely have stopped me too ... :(
Same here.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Thursday Next on February 03, 2012, 11:37:24 am
That gave me quite a jolt.  :(
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on February 03, 2012, 02:26:56 pm
The nearest thing to action on HMS Fox

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-42086/0010_0.jpg

She is near Loheiya in May 1916 in the Red Sea and has provided crew for the Launch Kamaran which is active against smugglers, presumably those bringing arms etc for the Turks or for Arabs that support them.

5.40 Kamaran returned alongside having driven ashore & burned dhow with contraband.

And the following day, just for a bit of variety.

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-42086/0010_1.jpg

5.00 Kamaran returned having driven ashore & destroyed sambak with contraband.

( Presumably in both cases Kamaran drove the ships ashore, not Kamaran was amphibious!!! Oh for some clear objects and subjects in some of these entries!).


Eventually managed to find confirmation that a sambak is another type of boat common in the Red Sea, here:
http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=Wv4ZuR4yPD8C&pg=PA62&lpg=PA62&dq="sambak"+boat&source=bl&ots=nfWWe1hewD&sig=w4XoUfxWgIRWs1Yp29hx6h1JLUY&hl=en&sa=X&ei=P_ErT-KSJsLitQahiLXVDA&ved=0CB4Q6A

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on February 04, 2012, 10:58:06 am
Generally, I have only taken a passing look at the number on the sick list on the ships that I have been working on.  This evening, I was very surprised to find that HMS Isis had 40 on the sick list on 24 June 1918 when she was westward bound in the North Atlantic.  This is almost 10% of her crew of about 450.  I then went back through the logs to see when the jump occurred.  For most of the logs, the number on the sick list ranged from 1 to 8, with a high of 12 in late March 1918.  In late June the numbers go as follows:
18 June     7 (sailed from Lamlash, Scotland)
19 June     5
20 June     5
21 June     10
22 June     14
23 June     22
24 June     40
(Looking forward, on 25 June there were 44 sick.)

The obvious culprit would be the early stages of Spanish flu.  Wikipedia makes the following the note about Spanish flu:
'In the United States, the disease was first observed at Haskell County, Kansas, in January 1918. On 4 March 1918, company cook Albert Gitchell reported sick at Fort Riley, Kansas. By noon on March 11, 1918, over 100 soldiers were in the hospital.[16] Within days, 522 men at the camp had reported sick.[17] By March 11, 1918 the virus had reached Queens, New York.[18]
 
In August 1918, a more virulent strain appeared simultaneously in Brest, France, in Freetown, Sierra Leone, and in the U.S. in Boston, Massachusetts. The Allies of World War I came to call it the Spanish flu, primarily because the pandemic received greater press attention after it moved from France to Spain in November 1918. Spain was not involved in the war and had not imposed wartime censorship.'


More on this when I've gone forward a bit further.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on February 04, 2012, 11:51:25 am
The plot thickens, then thins, on the Isis (see previous posting on the last page).  Number on sick list:
25 June     48
26 June     48
27 June     37
28 June     24
29 June     20  (arrived in Halifax)
30 June     13
1 July        10

No sick crewmen were discharged in Halifax, and there is no mention of widespread illness on board (other than the sick list).  Maybe the illness was something much more mundane than flu.

Has anyone else come across these sorts of fluctuation?
 ???
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Tegwen on February 04, 2012, 01:34:48 pm
Hi Steeleye

There is a thread 1918 - 19 Influenza epidemic here. http://forum.oldweather.org/index.php?topic=389.0

I remember HMS Odin having 68 of a nominal crew of 134 on the sick list. She had to lock up her signal books as no one with security clearance was fit enough to handle them.

However, unlike many ships she didnt lose anyone, at least no deaths were reported.

Enjoy the thread

K
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Randi on February 04, 2012, 01:47:33 pm
Here's another about No on sick list: http://forum.oldweather.org/index.php?topic=133.msg822#msg822
There was also a blog about it: http://blogs.zooniverse.org/oldweather/2011/01/hms-africa-in-action-against-orthomyxoviridae/



Also, I found this on HMS Bristol off Mexico:

June 1914
23(8), 24(8), 25(6), 26(8), 27(8), 28(9), 29(10), 30(9)

July 1914
1(11), 2(11), 3(13), 4(16), 5(18), 6(22), 7(28), 8(39), 9(56), 10(71), 11(72), 12(60), 13(54), 14(47), 15(40), 16(27), 17(20), 18(13), 19(9), 20(7), 21(11), 22(10), 23(8), 24(7)

No comment or explanation...
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Thursday Next on February 04, 2012, 03:38:29 pm
I've seen fluctuating sick lists on the Mantua, when she was on convoy duty off West Africa - the crew seemed generally to stay pretty healthy while she was on the Atlantic Patrol.  I've thought it was likely to be food poisoning/gastro-enteritis - I don't have any evidence for this, but I think it's a fair assumption that hygiene standards were a lot lower back then.

Incidentally, the Mantua has been credited with bringing the more virulent strain of Spanish flu you mentioned to Freetown.  She arrived in port with around 250 sick crew members and it spread from there.  Unfortunately the logs we have had on this project did not go up to August 1918.  Perhaps her later voyages are not of much interest to the scientists, but they must be fascinating from the historical viewpoint.  I am still hoping more logs will come up in the next tranche.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on February 05, 2012, 02:09:11 am
Hi all,
Thanks for the feedback on this - it's fascinating. I've just gone through most of the posts on the posts on the '1918-19 influenza epidemic' thread and that is obviously where I should have posted my original comment on HMS Isis.
Cheers
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on February 05, 2012, 03:39:21 am
On HMS Isis, 24 July 1918:
'Sale of effects of
R. Goodman A.B. No 114 (discharged)
E. Jaycock Boy No 160 (lost overboard)'

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45040/ADM%2053-45040-193_0.jpg (https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45040/ADM%2053-45040-193_0.jpg)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Press-ganged by the Swiss Navy on February 05, 2012, 06:18:23 am
A really busy day in Bombay - lots of crew and captain swapping with HMS Euryalus, HMS Venus, HMS Sapphire, HMS Northbrook, HMS Britomart: 30th October 1917: https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-41221/ADM%2053-41221-193_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Geoff on February 05, 2012, 08:30:07 am
Just started working on HMS Coventry and on 10th July 1920 they dressed the ship and "HMY Victoria & Albert with HM the King steamed round fleet".

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-74331/025_1.jpg (https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-74331/025_1.jpg)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: jil on February 06, 2012, 08:01:23 pm
HMS Hibernia - 8th July 1915
Landed Church party (300) for Special Service in Rosyth Dockyard conducted by His Grace the Archbishop of York

While trying to find out what this was about I found a picture showing the service which is rather impressive. I still don't know why they were having it though!

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-44275/0078_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: sunshine16 on February 06, 2012, 08:30:40 pm
22nd June 1914, HMS Topaze at Torbay = Dressed ship overall in honour of H.M King George V's coronation
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on February 06, 2012, 09:19:03 pm
HMS Hibernia - 8th July 1915
Landed Church party (300) for Special Service in Rosyth Dockyard conducted by His Grace the Archbishop of York

While trying to find out what this was about I found a picture showing the service which is rather impressive. I still don't know why they were having it though!

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-44275/0078_0.jpg

I suppose it's possible it was special simply because the Archbishop was there?  8th July doesn't sound like a particular religious feast.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Randi on February 06, 2012, 09:31:51 pm
HMS Hibernia - 8th July 1915
Landed Church party (300) for Special Service in Rosyth Dockyard conducted by His Grace the Archbishop of York

While trying to find out what this was about I found a picture showing the service which is rather impressive. I still don't know why they were having it though!

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-44275/0078_0.jpg

I suppose it's possible it was special simply because the Archbishop was there?  8th July doesn't sound like a particular religious feast.
That is what I was thinking :-\
I didn't find any obvious historical ties - but I didn't look very hard ;)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Danny252 on February 06, 2012, 10:45:07 pm
HMS St George, 24th April 1913. Engaged in fleet exercises in the channel - spent the entire morning attacking the "blue fleet"

(For a second there I thought I'd forgotten what date WW1 started!)

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-61152/0041_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on February 06, 2012, 10:56:29 pm
It gave me some pause too! She sights some RN vessels and then opens fire on them.  Some pretty serious exercises going on there and still 16 months to the kick-off.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on February 07, 2012, 12:12:07 am
It gave me some pause too! She sights some RN vessels and then opens fire on them.  Some pretty serious exercises going on there and still 16 months to the kick-off.

Just like the good old days with a Jonny Wilkinson pre-match warm up.  ;D
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on February 07, 2012, 06:00:00 am
St George, 6 May 1913:
'Fired Royal Salute of 21 guns and paraded guards in honour of Accession of King George V.'

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-61152/0047_0.jpg (https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-61152/0047_0.jpg)

The Good Ship St George was also dressed and undressed before and after the event.  Sounds a bit risque.   :o
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: LupusUK on February 07, 2012, 07:35:45 pm
HMS Hannibal, Alexandria, 21st August 1916

It was reported this afternoon, that after fumigating there was a certain amount of leakage. This was investigated at once by Fleet Surgeon, Engr Lt Sams & m.a.a. & all persons were ordered out of any place affected by fumes.

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-43712/201_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on February 07, 2012, 08:25:32 pm
How times have changed ...  HMS Himalaya, 5th April 1918, Rio de Janeiro, and getting ready to go to sea again.

'Received two bags mails for HM Principal Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs, Foreign Office, London.'

Now I expect it would all be e-mailed in a moment ...

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-44357/ADM%2053-44357-186_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: LupusUK on February 09, 2012, 06:48:50 am
HMS Hannibal, Alexandria, 8th September 1916

1.40 Officers servant found in motor boat. (somnambulist)
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-43712/212_0.jpg

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: bpb42 on February 09, 2012, 01:33:37 pm

HMS Isis, in the North Atlantic, on November 12th 1918,

'Divisions.Prayers. Read HM the Kings message to all ratings'

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45040/ADM%2053-45040-258_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on February 09, 2012, 03:30:39 pm

HMS Isis, in the North Atlantic, on November 12th 1918,

'Divisions.Prayers. Read HM the Kings message to all ratings'

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45040/ADM%2053-45040-258_1.jpg

Thanks for posting that. There are relatively few references to the Armistice in the logs and it led me to look around.
From http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/worldwars/wwone/mirror07_01.shtml
this seems to be (part of) the King's message:

"The King has sent congratulatory messages to the Navy, Army and Air Force.
Navy: 'Never in its history has the Royal Navy with God's help, done greater things for us.' "
No mention of splicing the mainbrace.

That link also lists the terms of the Armistice and other relevant details.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Janet Jaguar on February 09, 2012, 07:40:50 pm
It never occurred to me to wonder about the dangers of sleep-walking on a war ship!  Yikes!

HMS Hannibal, Alexandria, 8th September 1916

1.40 Officers servant found in motor boat. (somnambulist)
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-43712/212_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on February 10, 2012, 12:48:03 am

HMS Isis, in the North Atlantic, on November 12th 1918,

'Divisions.Prayers. Read HM the Kings message to all ratings'

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-45040/ADM%2053-45040-258_1.jpg

Thanks for posting that. There are relatively few references to the Armistice in the logs and it led me to look around.
From http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/worldwars/wwone/mirror07_01.shtml
this seems to be (part of) the King's message:

"The King has sent congratulatory messages to the Navy, Army and Air Force.
Navy: 'Never in its history has the Royal Navy with God's help, done greater things for us.' "
No mention of splicing the mainbrace.


Having said that ...

HMS Liverpool 11 Nov 1918 Mudros
7.0pm
"Spliced main brace in celebration of armistice with Germany"

I wonder when it became "The" Armistice, and Armistice with a capital letter?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on February 10, 2012, 07:15:19 am
I know it's only a typo (at least, I hope it is), but the air pressure at midnight on the Topaze while in Portland is certainly impressive!
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-63279/0135_1.jpg (https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-63279/0135_1.jpg)
 :o

Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: sunshine16 on February 10, 2012, 12:55:50 pm
On HMS Topaze, at portland on 14th Feb :
Ch Art Engr Shephard was today absent without leave for 17 hours. He did not make every endeavour to return as soon as possible. (2) He has disregarded the orders issued by the V.A.C.F. No 382 dated 10th Jan '15 whereby he did not receive the instruction to return on board being issued by a Patrol. (3) He omitted to leave his address on board.

Who's a naughty boy - did he have a Valentines Date?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: sunshine16 on February 10, 2012, 02:15:34 pm
on 20th feb, HMS Topaze, the only entry after 12:00 noon is:
Stopped in accordance with admiralty instructions.

This is followed by ablank page, then http://www.oldweather.org/classify?vessel_id=4edec02c14d0450578003659

which I thinks says
Following received from Admiralty to all ships number 122 alterations in Harwich Approach cantained in notice to mariners number 685 and 686 have been carried out. (2209)
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: sunshine16 on February 10, 2012, 03:43:16 pm
Am I going daft : http://www.oldweather.org/classify/edit/4f35268bbed9981f6a000097 is for 20th Feb 1915, Topaze, as is http://www.oldweather.org/classify/edit/4f353308bed998206b0007c6 - except this one carries on normally after 12:00.
After the latter one, I was given the start of Feb again, and the information was the same as i remembered, but looking at these 2 together now, they are in a different hand writing.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on February 10, 2012, 05:24:51 pm
# Good-day, Sunshine! Dah-da-dah #

(I feel much better now)

As I have often done, you've posted your "personal" url instead of the "view-by-all" .jpeg.

As the information is the same, it looks like the second log keeper decided that if he had to accept responsibility for the page it would be all his own work. Or maybe he didn't notice the partial page. (I've done that.)

Bunts
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Randi on February 10, 2012, 06:45:48 pm
See here for correct way to post a link to a page: http://forum.oldweather.org/index.php?topic=1073.msg10001#msg10001
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on February 10, 2012, 08:43:54 pm
Talk about last minute excitement!  Himalaya has just arrived in Devonport, having been away from the UK for just over 2 years, with very few encounters with any kind of enemy.  At 5am on May 7th:

Sighted periscope of enemy submarine 2 pts on Stbd bow.  Fired 2 rounds from S1 gun.  Incr. to full speed a/c as requisite to ram.  Periscope again broke surface astern and was not observed again.  Escorting destroyers proceeded in chase.  Courses & speeds as requisite to enter harbour.  7.0 Entered harbour.

I don't mind admitting my heart was in my mouth, even though I knew they'd obviously come to no harm!

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-44357/ADM%2053-44357-204_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on February 10, 2012, 09:24:49 pm
And this one's just intriguing - on 14th May, Himalaya records:

Discharged four cases for National War Museum and 1 package for Admiral King Hall.

I'd love to know what was in those four cases - and the package for that matter. 

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-44357/ADM%2053-44357-208_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on February 13, 2012, 08:07:04 am
From the log of HMS Topaze, 7 June 1915, in Grimsby:
'Observed reflections of flames NNW & WSW of ship. Heard aircraft believed to be going South.'
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-63284/0004_1.jpg (https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-63284/0004_1.jpg)

Checking the air action on the night of 6/7 June (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zeppelin (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zeppelin)) indicates that Hull (NNW of Grimsby) was attacked by Zeppelin L9.  The Wikipedia article states:
'The Naval airships also tried to raid London. L.10 attempted to reach the city on 4 June, strong winds led the commander to misjudge his position and the bombs were dropped on Gravesend. L.9 was also diverted by the weather on 6?7 June, attacking Hull instead of London and causing considerable damage. On the same night an Army raid of three Zeppelins also failed because of the weather; in an added blow, as the craft returned to Evere they coincided with a preplanned raid by RNAS aircraft flying from Furnes, France. LZ.38 was destroyed on the ground while LZ.37 was intercepted in the air by R. A. J. Warneford in his Morane Parasol, he dropped six 20 pounds (9.1 kg) Hales bombs on the zeppelin which caught fire and crashed into the convent school of Sint-Amandsberg. Two nuns were killed and the entire crew of the Zeppelin also died except for one man. Flight S/L Warneford was awarded the Victoria Cross for his achievement. As a further consequence of the raid both the Army and Navy withdrew from all bases in Belgium; the vulnerability of such sites was now clear.'
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on February 13, 2012, 08:20:03 am
From the log of HMS Topaze, 9 June 1915, in Grimsby:
'Exd. Small Arm Cos with new Japanese rifle'
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-63284/0005_1.jpg (https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-63284/0005_1.jpg)

A bit of a surprise for 1915.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Thursday Next on February 13, 2012, 11:36:28 am
I was surprised too when I first came across mention of Japanese firearms in the logs, but it seems they were in quite extensive use in WW1.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: sunshine16 on February 13, 2012, 11:50:48 am
A follow on to my messages last Friday - here are the correct images (sorry, I forgot) https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-63279/0152_1.jpg and https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-63280/0011_0.jpg, but I've also gone through the rest of Feb from 1st to 20th, and all the pages were rewritten by someone else.
And after the first log for 20th Feb, was this  page https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-63279/0154_0.jpg and this https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-63279/0154_1.jpg.
Why would 20 days logs we closed and copied out by someone else - I didn't notice anything different between the 2 sets, but I didn't do a close comparison.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Thursday Next on February 13, 2012, 11:57:45 am
This has happened on at least one of the other ships, the Carnarvon, where a couple of months of logs were presented twice in different handwriting.  I have no idea why this happened, but apparently it is very useful on the project as it helps to gauge accuracy!
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on February 13, 2012, 02:32:39 pm
my guess is that one set of the duplicate logs is the actual day to day set, filled out on the ship and the other set is the "fair copy" sent monthly to the Admiralty - the two sets were probably shelved together in storage.

Kathy
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Thursday Next on February 13, 2012, 02:43:16 pm
my guess is that one set of the duplicate logs is the actual day to day set, filled out on the ship and the other set is the "fair copy" sent monthly to the Admiralty - the two sets were probably shelved together in storage.

Kathy

In the Carnarvon's case they were both "fair" copies as there were months of logs in a single set of handwriting - no-one can be on duty for that long!  I actually suspect that some ships kept three copies - the original copy filled out watch by watch, a fair copy for the Admiralty, and another fair copy for the Captain's benefit.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: sunshine16 on February 13, 2012, 02:47:50 pm
I thought as the 20th Feb entry ended so suddenly with the lines 'Stopped in accordance with admiralty instructions' that someone was trying to lose something from the original copy - I must have a suspicious mind.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Kathy on February 13, 2012, 02:55:18 pm
hum - you do have to wonder why the Admiralty wanted the log stopped  :o

I bet you are right Su - there probably were 2 fair copies - the Captain would probably want one also -

Kathy

I wonder if the Admiralty wanted the log stopped because the type of log book was changed - I have transcribed 2 different types myself - the columns were the same, just the page was laid out differently.  K.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: jil on February 13, 2012, 04:52:50 pm
HMS Hibernia - 31st December 1915

Received 33 survivors from SS St. Oswald on board

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-44275/0178_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: jil on February 13, 2012, 06:30:20 pm
HMS Hibernia - 9th January 1916 - just heading back into Kephalo

Several heavy explosions & much firing in Gallipoli

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-44275/0185_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: jil on February 13, 2012, 06:44:13 pm
(Me again!) HMS Hibernia - 11th January 1916

Sent both picket boats equipped for service to fire 14" torpedoes at Sunken ships at C. Helles

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-44275/0186_1.jpg

They returned the next day having fired 4 torpedoes
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: sunshine16 on February 14, 2012, 01:03:17 pm
HMS Topaze, Adriatic, 15/09/1915 - a bit of excitement: 6.25 Observed large Hostile submarineby SEbE. a/c as reqd. Increased to 200 Revs. 6.33 Opened fire. 6.37 Submarine submerged - ceased fire. Called italian destroyer to search for submarine.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Thursday Next on February 14, 2012, 06:14:17 pm
HMS Hildebrand - we went through some terrible weather at the end of October 1917, with two of the boats washed away and several others damaged, then:

31 October 1917
11.10  Boarded Danish schooner "Ester" disabled
12.20  Made fast tow rope. Proceeded with S/V in tow
7.30    S/V Ester cast off towline 1 1/2 West of Ellidaey Is

I suppose they must have made repairs to the ship while under tow and decided they could now make it on their own.

1 November 1917
11.35  Obs wreck of S/V on Skieret reef. Closed to examine. 5 men apparently salving part of cargo.
1.20    Sent prize crew onboard HMS Tenby Castle. Lieut in charge of trawler reported wreck to be Schooner "Ester" of Denmark total wreck on Skieret reef. Crew of Ester safe onshore in hospital, fishermen salving Cargo.

Oh well ... at least we tried!

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-44346/ADM%2053-44346-038_1.jpg
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-44346/ADM%2053-44346-041_1.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: sunshine16 on February 15, 2012, 09:21:51 am
HMS Fox, 1st october 1917 - log entry : 26th August SS Diyatalawa Collided with ship on Port Bow + damaged No 1 Port 4.7 inch Gun
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Steeleye on February 15, 2012, 10:36:33 am
On HMS Topaze, 18 November 1915:
'Sighted lifebuoy & floating wreckage. Co as reqte to examine it.'
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-63289/0010_0.jpg (https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-63289/0010_0.jpg)

Topaze was patrolling in the Adriatic, between Brindisi and Albania at the time.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: sunshine16 on February 16, 2012, 01:43:43 pm
On HMS Topaze 2/2/1916, near Brindisi , Adriatic:
8.5 Large explosion on Starb'd quarter SSE. 10' Merchant ship sunk.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: sunshine16 on February 16, 2012, 02:07:02 pm
HMS Topaze, 14th Feb 1916 - 1.45 
Sighted a bright white light on Starb'd bow
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: sunshine16 on February 17, 2012, 11:35:09 am
HMS Topaze, 27 April 1916, Brindisi - 3.30 Football party landed
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: sunshine16 on February 17, 2012, 02:04:57 pm
HMS Topaze, Gibraltar, 13th June 1916
9.10 Landed Party for Memorial Service to Lord Kitchener
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Helen J on February 20, 2012, 08:13:27 pm
HMS Hannibal, 1st April 1917, in Alexandria:

3.45pm 33 survivors came on board from HMT Cardinal
5pm 33 survivors discharged to Passport Office

I haven't been able to find any more information about the Cardinal (yet!) so I don't know the rest of the story.

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-43713/0090_1.jpg

On 15th April there are more survivors (41) , this time they arrived on HMS Verbena, and a search of naval history.net found a record of a troopship, the Arcadian, torpedoed in the Aegean.  There were 9 naval casualties, of whom 8 were from Hannibal, on passage.

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-43713/0097_1.jpg

This sent me back to check the records for 31st March and 1st April in case Cardinal was a red herring (as it were) and not the actual source of the survivors - but I still can't find any mention of it at all.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on February 20, 2012, 11:59:48 pm
HMS Hannibal, 1st April 1917, in Alexandria:

3.45pm 33 survivors came on board from HMT Cardinal
5pm 33 survivors discharged to Passport Office

I haven't been able to find any more information about the Cardinal (yet!) so I don't know the rest of the story.

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-43713/0090_1.jpg

On 15th April there are more survivors (41) , this time they arrived on HMS Verbena, and a search of naval history.net found a record of a troopship, the Arcadian, torpedoed in the Aegean.  There were 9 naval casualties, of whom 8 were from Hannibal, on passage.

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-43713/0097_1.jpg

This sent me back to check the records for 31st March and 1st April in case Cardinal was a red herring (as it were) and not the actual source of the survivors - but I still can't find any mention of it at all.

That could be a find.
"HMT" - check.
"Arcadian" / "Cardinal" - Chinese Whispers?
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Bunting Tosser on February 21, 2012, 01:40:24 am
HMS Hannibal, 1st April 1917, in Alexandria:

3.45pm 33 survivors came on board from HMT Cardinal
5pm 33 survivors discharged to Passport Office

I haven't been able to find any more information about the Cardinal (yet!) so I don't know the rest of the story.

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-43713/0090_1.jpg

On 15th April there are more survivors (41) , this time they arrived on HMS Verbena, and a search of naval history.net found a record of a troopship, the Arcadian, torpedoed in the Aegean.  There were 9 naval casualties, of whom 8 were from Hannibal, on passage.

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-43713/0097_1.jpg

This sent me back to check the records for 31st March and 1st April in case Cardinal was a red herring (as it were) and not the actual source of the survivors - but I still can't find any mention of it at all.

That could be a find.
"HMT" - check.
"Arcadian" / "Cardinal" - Chinese Whispers?
Furthermore:
HMS Hannibal 30 Apr 1917 Alexandria
"5.10(pm) 1 Rating discharged to HMT Cardinal"
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-43713/0105_0.jpg
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Geoff on February 21, 2012, 08:34:42 am
From Hannibal 2 May 1917:

"On April 7th 1917. D.D. Missing believed drowned from H.M. Transport "Areadian" Archibald, Vernon Tavender, Ord Sea, J67088 aged 31 years; Edward William Stone, Stoker II cl K37680 aet 26 years; Harry Jellyman, Stoker II cl, K39766 aet 33 years; William George Wiltshire (ord sea), J67093 aet 23 years; Walter Edwin Harry Wilcox Ord Sea J67102. aet 18 years. Percy Tomkins, Sto II cl. K37875. aet 34 years; George John Crothall, Sto II cl, K39194 aet 40 years; Thomas Robert Scott, Sto II K39618 aet 30 years; Henry Wood, Ord Sea, J67104 aet 29 years."

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-43713/0108_0.jpg (https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-43713/0108_0.jpg)

Not sure about the name of the ship.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: studentforever on February 21, 2012, 01:03:13 pm
It might be Arcadian but I agree it isn't easy to read.
Title: Re: Riveting Log Entries
Post by: Geoff on February 21, 2012, 01:46:21 pm
It was the Arcadian.

Here is an interesting account of the disaster: ht