Old Weather Forum

Library => The Voyages, The Work, The People: Everyday Life at Sea => Topic started by: bohne2k7 on October 12, 2010, 01:20:40 pm

Title: Reading Port Names
Post by: bohne2k7 on October 12, 2010, 01:20:40 pm
As a suggestion, I'm starting a thread for getting help specifically with port names.

To make a start I attached a screenshot of the port name stated by the HMS Orotava on December 30th, 1914.

Q.....town

I assume, it's not "Queenstown" as that's in New Zealand :D

Thank's for the help,
Bohne
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: Geoff on October 12, 2010, 01:24:33 pm
It's probably Queenstown, Ireland.

See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cobh (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cobh)
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: ElisabethB on October 12, 2010, 01:26:49 pm
Hi Bohne,
I see Geoff beat me to it !
Welcome on board !  :D
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: DJ_59 on October 12, 2010, 02:36:58 pm

Great idea for a topic.  Thanks, Bohne.  Yeah, I was having trouble with one earlier, too.  I think it's Walker-on-Tyne, but I can't find that via Google. 

Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: Geoff on October 12, 2010, 02:55:25 pm

Great idea for a topic.  Thanks, Bohne.  Yeah, I was having trouble with one earlier, too.  I think it's Walker-on-Tyne, but I can't find that via Google.

Probably Wallsend-on-Tyne, see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wallsend (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wallsend)
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: ElisabethB on October 12, 2010, 03:11:29 pm
there is a part of the town called Walker and it's near the river.
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: navalhistory on October 14, 2010, 03:34:38 pm
Dear bonhne2k7

I run the www.naval-history.net side of things and want to say how impressed I am with the way everyone is helping each other. This is all way beyond my expectations.

A list of the ports used by RN warships, even if not every one used in WW1, would be very useful, and I hope I might add it to www.naval-history.net sometime.

Many thanks,

Gordon
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: bohne2k7 on October 14, 2010, 03:41:57 pm
Actually, that would be pretty useful! Isn't it possible to extract it from somewhere else, where it already exists? I would be surprised, there isn't any around - digitalised or not.

But anyway, we keep on logging :) It's by far the most interesting Zooniverse project, which demands for the highest skills. Reading those old handwritings is anything but easy :-\

Cheers,
Bohne
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: navalhistory on October 14, 2010, 05:00:55 pm
Dear Bohne,

Yes there are plenty of port lists on the internet, but to the best of my knowledge, none of them are WW1 period-specific.

So many names have changed, that not even WW2 lists are that helpful. Your suggested list could be a first.

Old Weather has a draft list I have put online at http://www.naval-history.net/OxonPorts.txt. Once I find the source, I'll let you know.

Gordon
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: navalhistory on October 14, 2010, 05:14:59 pm
Philip Brohan of Old Weather worked on the list:

"It does come from me - work done for an earlier project on WW2
logbooks (http://journals.ametsoc.org/doi/abs/10.1175/2008BAMS2522.1).
If anybody wants to use and improve it that's fine by me."
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: navalhistory on October 14, 2010, 05:17:05 pm
Geof,

Walker's was a shipyard on the Tyne. Googling will confirm.

Gordon
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: killian441 on October 14, 2010, 05:26:57 pm
Ports I have seen so far:

Swansea - http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-59342/ADM53-59342-006_0.jpg
Cardiff -(Highly stylized C I believe) http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-59342/ADM53-59342-006_1.jpg
Ilfracombe - http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-59342/ADM53-59342-007_0.jpg

Anchorage/Other:
Tenby - http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-59342/ADM53-59342-010_0.jpg
Mumbles - (Mumbles Lighthouse, and Mumbles Roads are mentioned) http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-59342/ADM53-59342-010_0.jpg
Caldy Island - (looks like it is now called Caldney Island) http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-59342/ADM53-59342-010_0.jpg

Priory Bay is mentioned here: http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-59342/ADM53-59342-010_1.jpg but the only modern reference I could find to it puts it close to the Isle of Wight which seems too far away to be the correct bay.
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: bohne2k7 on October 15, 2010, 09:30:42 am
As the HMS Orotava was in Liverpool for a couple of days in end-January 1915, I encountered names for different docks and basins in the harbour(s) of Liverpool.

Those, which seem to be quite important for Royal Navy ships in those days at Liverpool are:

Alfred Dock / Basin; which is actually the proxy, through which each ship has to go to get into the further docks/basins of the Great Float (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Float) (split up into East and West Float) off from the River Mersey.
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: sierran on October 16, 2010, 05:29:42 am
An excellent topic.  Although HMS Otranto seems to have fairly clear watchstander handwriting when it comes to anchorages, I'll throw the ones I've seen her visit so far into the list.  These are from late 1914.

Montevideo (Uruguay)
Punta Arenas (Chile)
Puerto Montt (Chile) (yes, two t's)
Vallenar Roads (I presume the anchorage ('Roads') off Vallenar, Chile)


Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: HawkerHart on October 16, 2010, 03:02:24 pm
Having trouble with this location:
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-41443/ADM53-41443-025_1.jpg

mentioned at the top and around 6am.
Looks like Lough Swilly, but thats in Ireland and from the previous log they were shaping for Broadford Bay, which I found off Isle of Skye. Skye to N.Ireland possible in that time frame?
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: ElisabethB on October 16, 2010, 03:46:34 pm
Really difficult to read !
The first letter of the second word could be a T (it looks the same as in Tuesday)
No idea for the rest, sorry.
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: andysweeney on October 16, 2010, 03:51:05 pm
Easily doable and it was a major Naval base around WW1. Looks like it to me.
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: HawkerHart on October 16, 2010, 03:58:38 pm
Thanks ;D Just looked again at the previous log and towards the end it mentioned passing Barra. So Swilly it is.
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: cornish_k8 on October 17, 2010, 08:23:19 pm
I have a good one from HMS Cornwall  - Livorno in Italy appears under its english name of Leghorn, which was pronounced as Leggun.

Apparently Leghorn chickens come from that area.

Looking at Wiki is would seem to be an interesting place to visit.

Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: CharlesNorrieTemp on October 17, 2010, 08:57:02 pm
May I suggest a look up list? 

I am on the Comus in 1920, and a lot of names will change come Indian and Sri Lankan Independence.   

For ports it usually quite easy to look up in the Wikipedia;  lighthouses are a different kettle, but if we had a three or more columns -  list country, port or lighthouse (current name), port or lighthouse (old name), and possibly more columns for old variants, we'd be there.

The editing software possibly picks this up already (and would do, if I had anything to do with it), but actually it's quite nice to know what you are encoding.

The record box for events, and even for locations is not quite explicit enough at the moment.

For locations I have to put two numbers and a letter in a box, and I don't know whether the software picks it up. 

I put things like lighthouses under events and you get a nasty string which says something likw

nn.mm XX light abeam N75W. 

I could code it more clearly.

Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: Kathy on October 21, 2010, 11:12:54 pm
For the crew of the Foxglove, the port in 1921 is Wei Hai Wei - it took me forever to figure this one out!
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: andysweeney on October 21, 2010, 11:23:43 pm
I want to see just how many versions of THAT get put in the five different transcriptions!!
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: CharlesNorrieTemp on October 22, 2010, 09:07:31 am
About 150 miles, so if your ship is capable of 15 knots, 10 hours.

Remember in early Celtic Christian times, when roads were unavailable, contact was almost always by sea.

That's why we have monasteries on places like Iona part of that CC tradition.

Do you know why you've been sent to Skye?
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: dazedandconfused on October 22, 2010, 11:26:52 am
Lough Swilly http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lough_Swilly
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: Carpe Noctem on October 22, 2010, 05:06:04 pm
First off, let me point out how incredibly helpful this post has been; the information from wiki references and port info has been invaluable.

Currenty transcribing the HMS Vengeance and need help identifying the Port on November 13, 1914.

Any help would be much apprecited. 

(http://i54.tinypic.com/e6aeqq.png)


Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: zoot horn rollo on October 22, 2010, 05:10:37 pm
Gibraltar
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: Carpe Noctem on October 22, 2010, 05:25:22 pm
 ;D Can't thank you enough. Had a hunch it was Gibralter but wasn't sure. THANK YOU  ;D
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: Zeus2007 on October 26, 2010, 04:49:52 am
Ah, this is getting more interested by the minute.  I'm starting to think that I need to open many windows and assign them different tasks...it's like I can take two hours readying a report before I send it because perhaps Google is a great tool to get extra info not given by the report which can help us decypher some of these unknowns.  Say if we can't read something and we post it up here for help but there isn't anyone around at that time...do we move on or wait for someone to reply?
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: CharlesNorrieTemp on October 26, 2010, 09:02:39 am
I think a list of port names with their modern equivalents, which we could put together in and extended trice would be a boon.

Though not strictly necessary for the cleaning up software can look up any name and get its latitude and longitude, the point of getting the name in the first place, it would create a little bit of fun. 

Lists of lighthouse and lightship names would be nice too. 

I shall have to write at some point on the use of long and lat in the project, as the data collection is a bit of a mess at this point at the moment.  I use a workaround and produce cleaned up computer ready input, but it needs fields interpreted different from their original function in the interface.

But if they're not wanted these observations can just be ignored by the clean up processes.

It may stem from the decision of using a 250km circle of error for data collection, which I believe we can improve, and I think the science team is looking at. 

The weather codes too could be listed in an eay and usable fashion.

The place to put this stuff is in the grey panels to the left and right of the log book, which are frankly just wasted space at the moment.

Charles

Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: navalhistory on October 26, 2010, 01:13:05 pm
Charles,

A list of WW1-period ports AND capes, islands, lighthouses, lightships, major buoys etc. with their modern names and in the case of the latter, their locations, is a huge undertaking. (Many of the lighthouses, ships and buoys no longer exist). It would however be a valuable WW1 resource.

I've spent some years researching hundreds of British WW1 ship losses, and finding out where they were lost or damaged. I can't tell you how hard it has been to find many of the locations e.g. Algerian capes with different names, islands in the Adriatic and Aegean with a variety of spellings, none of them current. And the hardest, tracking down the Green Flash Buoy around the British coasts.

I would have purchased your very first book.

Go to it - please!

Gordon
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: CharlesNorrieTemp on October 26, 2010, 01:42:31 pm
Dear Gordon,

 I wish I'd the time and energy to!

But as a simple extension of this OW project, simply collect feature names (and we're only talking thousands), and this project has millions of records to make.  (100,000 logs by 365 days by 6-7 observations  day, say 250M oservations eacj with 6-7 different bits of data. 

So simple task!
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: NicciAdonai on October 26, 2010, 04:19:55 pm
Having trouble with this name (HMS Astraea):

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-34353/ADM53-34353-137_0.jpg

Thanks.

EDIT: Duala, maybe? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duala
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: Caro on October 26, 2010, 04:33:24 pm
Hi NicciAdonai and welcome aboard.
If your ship is in African waters, I would guess at Duala (Doula, Cameroon).
Maybe?  :D
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: NicciAdonai on October 26, 2010, 04:37:42 pm
Ah, beat me to it. (See edit in above post.) Thanks for the quick reply.
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: Caro on October 26, 2010, 04:41:10 pm
Sadly, I can't spell. Douala, Cameroon.  ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: CharlesNorrieTemp on October 26, 2010, 04:58:20 pm
A bit of history: The Portuguese were first in Cameroon (not known by that name then), then the English.  There people were involved in the slave trade. Doula (unnamed) was then called Cameroons Town it became Kamerunstadt, when the Germans turned it into the German Imperial colony of Kamerun. Given to the French under a UN mandate in 1919 after WWI.
Douala is the modern name, which I think it best to use.

Charles
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: navalhistory on October 26, 2010, 06:17:10 pm
You can find out more about the Navy's side of the campaign at http://www.naval-history.net/WW1Battle1409Cameroons.htm including despatch, contemporary map (then it was Duala), British casualties and awards.

Really looking forward to reading the logs of the ships that were there.

Gordon
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: Esteis on October 26, 2010, 11:56:20 pm
I'm transcribing the H.M.S. Juno, and I'm not entirely sure which port she names in these three logs. (I do have an idea, but I'd rather hear yours independently.) Any suggestions?

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-45459/ADM%2053-45459-004_1.jpg (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-45459/ADM%2053-45459-004_1.jpg)

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-45459/ADM%2053-45459-005_0.jpg (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-45459/ADM%2053-45459-005_0.jpg)

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-45459/ADM%2053-45459-005_1.jpg (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-45459/ADM%2053-45459-005_1.jpg)
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: navalhistory on October 27, 2010, 12:39:36 am
esties,

Sorry, beaten. JUNO was in the Persian Gulf area, the crew went ashore on leave, so it was probably not in the Mesopotamian war zone. I can't find any maps of the Gulf at that time, but I wonder if it might not be a contemporary English spelling of Qatar as Q'tar. But I'm not betting on it.

Gordon
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: Esteis on October 28, 2010, 09:29:31 pm
BAM, brainwave!
It's Q'town --- the so-and-so has a habit of not so much crossing his 't' as overlining the letters that follow. Now I know Q'town is not in the Persian Gulf, but perhaps she hasn't set sail for that region yet. We'll see. Once she sets sail we'll get coordinates, and then we'll know where to look for that illegible port of hers.
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: ChrisE on October 28, 2010, 09:59:58 pm
http://screencast.com/t/R29Kd1Bj6Mn

Should be Northern part of East Coast of USA. Any ideas?
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: ElisabethB on October 28, 2010, 10:15:03 pm
Hi Chris
could you post a link to the page, that way we can compare the handwriting style and letters to other words on the page ?
(right click on the page and copy the address)
Thanks
I see something like Olna Firth or Otna Firth
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: ChrisE on October 28, 2010, 10:19:12 pm
Yeah sure. Do you mean this http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-32689/ADM53-32689-169_1.jpg or http://www.oldweather.org/classify?vessel_id=4caf837ccadfd3419700021a that link?

Sorry, I'm completely new to oldweather, the forum, ships, such weather notifications and such.
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: ElisabethB on October 28, 2010, 10:23:04 pm
Hi ChrisE
the .jpeg will do nicely.
Back to trying out some combinations !
And welcome to OldWeather !  :D
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: ChrisE on October 28, 2010, 10:35:31 pm
Thanks.

I noted the logger's i dot is sometimes far off to the right.

What if I closed my browser window, that log would be gone?
And there are several bugs... I clicked on "edit" for an event and it disappeared from the jpeg. When I wanted to delete it from the sidebar, all data was erased :(

Maybe, while you're at it, can you help me with the last weather code? ovc?
And the events are quite interesting, too, but I feel I'm lacking basic knowledge to guess some missing words:
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: Esteis on October 28, 2010, 10:51:00 pm
Hi ChrisE,
I'm on the Achilles, too. (Well, for now. I'm going to make Lieutenant, and then I'm jumping ship. *_^) The port looks to me like Olna Firth, in the Shetlands. The last weather code looks like ocr --- overcast, cloudy, rain.
You can open the image in a new tab and blow it up as far as you like.
You can find a list of weather codes here:
http://forum.oldweather.org/index.php?topic=22.msg69#msg69
Cheers,
--Sietse
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: ChrisE on October 28, 2010, 11:02:24 pm
Many thanks, really, thank you very much!

Do you also have any idea for the missing parts of the events?
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: Esteis on October 28, 2010, 11:03:09 pm
And the events are quite interesting, too, but I feel I'm lacking basic knowledge to guess some missing words:
  • Laid Out Port Bower anchor + (or &) 6 1/2 *? ?*. Got out Kedge anchor.
  • Replaced gear
  • Leave to 5% ships company till 5.30 p.m. Hands *?* as *?*
  • *?* alright in both steamboats.
Looks like:
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: Esteis on October 28, 2010, 11:05:50 pm
Found you something on the anchors, too:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kedge_anchor#Kedging

[blockquote]In yachts, a kedge anchor is an anchor carried in addition to the main, or bower anchors, and usually stowed aft. Every yacht should carry at least two anchors ? the main or bower anchor and a second lighter kedge anchor. It is used occasionally when it is necessary to limit the turning circle as the yacht swings when it is anchored, such as in a very narrow river or a deep pool in an otherwise shallow area.[/blockquote]

And not a problem, it's nice to have questions to answer. :-)
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: ChrisE on October 28, 2010, 11:08:36 pm
Yes, I already found out about the bower and kedge anchors :) But what is that 6 1/2 something?
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: Esteis on October 28, 2010, 11:18:30 pm
Nope, mate, not a clue.
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: ChrisE on October 28, 2010, 11:29:50 pm
I think I got it: 6 1/2 wire hawser. Could be "wide", too, but I wrote wire... well^^
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: Ken D. on October 29, 2010, 05:59:07 pm
Does anyone know what port this might be?

To me it looks like "At Abrolhal".

Here is the image:
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-37402/ADM%2053-37402-068_0.jpg

Thanks much!
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: Caro on October 29, 2010, 06:04:28 pm
Abrolhos I think Ken.  :D
Welcome aboard.
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: ElisabethB on October 29, 2010, 06:09:16 pm
Geez Caro ! You are fast !  ;D
Abrolhos is what I came up with too.
Houtman Abrolhos Islands in the Indian Ocean of the West Coast of Australia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Houtman_Abrolhos)
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: CharlesNorrieTemp on October 29, 2010, 07:09:00 pm
Agreed -  Abrolhos Islands -

Does it fit the rest of the voyage.

Charles
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: Jens on October 29, 2010, 07:34:55 pm
If it's Abrolhos take care, there are two of them
http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abrolhos, in the Atlantic  at the brasilian coast

As Charles said, it have to fit to the rest of the course.;-)
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: navalhistory on October 29, 2010, 07:40:44 pm
Did you get all of the first query?

"Laid out Port Bower (Port bow) anchor and 6 1/2 (inch diameter)  wire hawser. Got out Kedge anchor (usually stern anchor I believe, without checking).

Leave to 5% ship's company till 5.30pm.
Hands employed as required

Fires alight in both steamboat (boilers) 1800"

Gordon
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: ChrisE on October 29, 2010, 07:54:58 pm
Hmm, I guessed "5%" but was convinced of "57"... Well, nvm, it's not the end of the world ;D
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: peabrain on October 30, 2010, 10:28:30 am
Hi, Just signed up and the first watchman's handwriting is worse than mine :o. I read through the other posts, but am still stumped. Can anyone read the port name? Looks like Bh[eau][mn]eas to me, which can't place (pick any/all letters in the brackets). I initially thought something like Bahamas, but one of the events seems to be discharging someone to Canterbury prison, so I tried looking for UK ports as well, but found nothing looking like this.

List of UK ports: http://ports.org.uk/allportstext.asp
Full log: http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-33193/ADM53-33193-008_0.jpg (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-33193/ADM53-33193-008_0.jpg)
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: peabrain on October 30, 2010, 10:53:51 am
Aha, found it: Sheerness! From Wikipedia:
"The 6th Battle Squadron returned to Dover in December 1914, then transferred to Sheerness on 30 December 1914 to relieve the 5th Battle Squadron there in guarding against a German invasion of the United Kingdom"
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Albemarle_%281901%29 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Albemarle_%281901%29)

Will do a little more research before posting next time :)
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: DJ_59 on October 30, 2010, 04:19:43 pm

Nice job, peabrain.  (Hmm... there's no way to say that without it sounding like an insult!)  Seriously, good job on the research there. 

Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: Jwb52z on November 02, 2010, 07:36:42 pm
I can't figure out the port on http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-45877/ADM%2053-45877-004_0.jpg , so, I will leave it for someone else to do.
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: Caro on November 02, 2010, 08:12:52 pm
Oh boy.
My guess would be Niouma ~ ~.
I found a Niouma (various spellings) in Equatorial Guinea.
Is the Laconia in that part of the world?  :D
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: navalhistory on November 02, 2010, 09:35:53 pm
Laconia is listed as in the South Atlantic, so maybe Guinea. The rest may possibly be Islands Anchorage. But really can't read the main name.

Gordon
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: Zeus2007 on November 09, 2010, 02:39:44 am
Some of those names are really weird...I think the world was different back then like their names have changed.  And some of the handwriting makes it even more dificult.
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: sixtyq5 on November 09, 2010, 05:27:44 am
Some of those names are really weird...I think the world was different back then like their names have changed.  And some of the handwriting makes it even more dificult.

Very true. I've been scouring the East China Sea on Google Maps and Earth for a clue about an island mentioned in Despatch's logs (sorry don't have link anymore for anyone to help :)). It looked like Orleren Is. or something. Thankfully, some old names for islands are still recognizable, like Turnabout Island, though Google labels it in Chinese.

Especially in China, with the Romanized names used these days (not to mention the transliteration to Pinyin or Wade-Giles) over the RN terms of the past century, some of these port names can be really tricky. I was stuck on some maps for about 20 minutes trying to find one! It's a nice geography lesson, though.
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: sbrisko on January 05, 2011, 05:53:56 am
Having trouble deciphering what this port is for the HMS Cairo.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM%2053-72182/ADM%2053-72182-013_0.jpg
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: Caro on January 05, 2011, 07:31:19 am
Chemulpho, South Korea?
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: Janet Jaguar on January 05, 2011, 07:34:17 am
It looked like "Chunnulpho" so I plugged that in Fuzzy Gazetteer (http://isodp.fh-hof.de/fuzzyg/query/).  It game back this:
Chemulpho:   South Korea, Inch'?n-gwangy?ksi (seat of a first-order administrative division)   [Lat: 37?27'13'' N; Long: 126?43'54'' E]   

Checking back at your page, I think it really written 'emu' in the middle.  Is Cairo by South Korea just now?
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: szukacz on January 05, 2011, 08:05:48 am
In my opinion, the tip is "bo" no "ho" look at the letter b in Ocotber. ::)
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: Janet Jaguar on January 05, 2011, 03:31:14 pm
In my opinion, the tip is "bo" no "ho" look at the letter b in Ocotber. ::)

And look at the 'h' in Physical.  Any time a log-keeper's handwriting forces me to guess if he spelled a proper name correctly or wrong, I opt for the correct spelling to help the historians and analysts.  If the log-keeper's handwriting is clearly a bad spelling, I type what he wrote. 
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: dorbel on January 05, 2011, 04:01:57 pm
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Re: Reading Port Names
? Reply #62 on: November 02, 2010, 07:36:42 pm ?

    * Quote

I can't figure out the port on http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-45877/ADM%2053-45877-004_0.jpg , so, I will leave it for someone else to do.
 
Better late than never! This one is Niororo Island Anchorage.
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: Bunting Tosser on January 05, 2011, 05:00:19 pm
Captain Dorbel,

"This one is Niororo Island Anchorage."
Sorry, hadn't got my sea legs, back in November.
HMS Severn is trading in the same waters (e.g. sinking Konigsberg about that time). Must try not to get in your way.
There are some interesting place names, often with alternating spellings (not just handwriting vagaries) depending on the individual's preference, presumably.

Bunts
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: dorbel on January 05, 2011, 09:37:40 pm
Yes, sometimes I have to wait for Trent to catch up in order to decipher Laconia's miserable scrawl. Her (Trent's) log-keeper writes a lovely clear hand. Still, don't knock Laconia, we supply your beef!
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: Bunting Tosser on January 05, 2011, 11:55:43 pm
Nah, mate. We can do our own shopping:
http://forum.oldweather.org/index.php?topic=903.0
and reply #2

If you want your fortune told, can you get this where you are:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00x9cjj
(6th Jan)

B
Title: Re: Reading Port Names
Post by: dorbel on January 06, 2011, 10:09:40 am
Terrific, there are some ways of seeing UK tv, I've hardly bothered but I'd love to see this. Thanks!