Old Weather Forum

Old Weather: Whaling => Learning the Ropes & FAQ => Topic started by: Randi on April 01, 2016, 07:37:46 pm

Title: Chat
Post by: Randi on April 01, 2016, 07:37:46 pm
The December 2015 issue of Smithsonian magazine has an article:
"How Nantucket Came to Be the Whaling Capital of the World" (http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/nantucket-came-to-be-whaling-capital-of-world-180957198/?no-ist)
by Nathaniel Philbrick
(author of the nonfiction book In the Heart of the Sea: The Tragedy of the Whaleship Essex)

It is a fascinating history of Nantucket and whaling - though not for the fainthearted.
Title: Re: Chat
Post by: AvastMH on April 01, 2016, 08:43:02 pm
That was a powerful article Randi. I understand a lot more about the industry now. And the story of the finding of the two Brothers was great :)
Title: Re: Chat
Post by: Randi on April 08, 2016, 01:35:28 pm
A sperm whale?s head is built for ramming (https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/wild-things/sperm-whale%E2%80%99s-head-built-ramming?tgt=nr)
Title: Re: Chat
Post by: AvastMH on April 08, 2016, 09:31:53 pm
A sperm whale?s head is built for ramming (https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/wild-things/sperm-whale%E2%80%99s-head-built-ramming?tgt=nr)

 That's interesting. And frankly scary. I've heard about pilot dolphins ramming each other in a similar way though they target the victims chest cavity. Makes one realise how fragile those whaling boats were effectively  :-\
Title: Re: Chat
Post by: Randi on May 27, 2016, 08:30:14 pm
Why Do Beluga Whales Blow Bubbles?

(http://thumbs.media.smithsonianmag.com//filer/0b/a8/0ba806b4-815a-4f76-8022-811822c3d326/mar2016_i07_phenom.jpg__800x600_q85_crop.jpg) (http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/why-do-beluga-whales-blow-bubbles-180958095/?no-ist)
Title: Re: Chat
Post by: mapurves on May 28, 2016, 12:39:45 am
Because they can't blow smoke rings! Their cigarettes go out in the water.  ;D
Title: Re: Chat
Post by: AvastMH on May 28, 2016, 12:44:13 am
 ;D ;D ;D

I can't blow bubbles like that! That's really clever. So it could be to show us up? Then again if you're looking at the bubble rings you won't notice other gaseous productions at the other end (distraction tactics)?  ;) ;) ;D
Title: Re: Chat
Post by: Randi on November 25, 2016, 04:27:32 pm
Why whales jump out of the water, or slap it with their fins (http://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20161124-humpback-whales-can-talk-with-their-bodies)
Title: Re: Chat
Post by: AvastMH on November 25, 2016, 07:31:32 pm
Why whales jump out of the water, or slap it with their fins (http://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20161124-humpback-whales-can-talk-with-their-bodies)

  I couldn't get to the full article through this route. If anyone would like to see the full article please let me know :)
Title: Re: Chat
Post by: Randi on February 19, 2017, 03:47:53 am
It took a set of specific circumstances to allow the blue whale to become the largest of all animals
Quote from: http://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20170216-how-an-empty-sea-helped-the-blue-whale-grow-so-enormous
The blue whale is, famously, the largest animal to ever live.
Think for a minute what that means. According to some estimates, there are about 7.7 million animal species alive today, and who knows how many more have lived on Earth since the first animals appeared about 650 million years ago.
Those species include elephants, whale sharks, polar bears, tyrannosaurs, and titanosaurs - all species with a reputation for large size. But not one of them is, or was, as large as the blue whale.
Title: Re: Chat
Post by: AvastMH on February 19, 2017, 04:58:18 pm
It took a set of specific circumstances to allow the blue whale to become the largest of all animals
Quote from: http://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20170216-how-an-empty-sea-helped-the-blue-whale-grow-so-enormous
The blue whale is, famously, the largest animal to ever live.
Think for a minute what that means. According to some estimates, there are about 7.7 million animal species alive today, and who knows how many more have lived on Earth since the first animals appeared about 650 million years ago.
Those species include elephants, whale sharks, polar bears, tyrannosaurs, and titanosaurs - all species with a reputation for large size. But not one of them is, or was, as large as the blue whale.

'Instead of having to spend energy hunting a single prey item like a fish or seal, energy that could be wasted if it escapes, the baleen whales simply glide through dense clouds of krill like aquatic combine harvesters, swallowing up to 457,000 calories in one gulp.'  :o :o :o

The numbers in this article are immense :)
Title: Re: Chat
Post by: Randi on February 28, 2017, 05:40:24 am
The disaster that helped end the US whaling industry (http://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20170224-the-disaster-that-helped-end-the-us-whaling-industry)
Title: Re: Chat
Post by: AvastMH on February 28, 2017, 09:17:59 pm
The disaster that helped end the US whaling industry (http://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20170224-the-disaster-that-helped-end-the-us-whaling-industry)

Great article Randi - thanks for posting it :D It is lucky for the whales that there was a decent amount of Arctic ice around in those days. It's a shame that the ships can be found so easily with the Arctic turning to water now :(
Title: Re: Chat
Post by: Randi on May 11, 2017, 02:56:11 am
Reconstruction of the San Juan a 16'th century Basque whaling ship in Pasaia, Spain: ALBAOLA UNESCO EN (https://www.youtube.com/embed/DLZfpkp5XM8)
Title: Re: Chat
Post by: AvastMH on May 11, 2017, 06:19:19 pm
Reconstruction of the San Juan a 16'th century Basque whaling ship in Pasaia, Spain: ALBAOLA UNESCO EN (https://www.youtube.com/embed/DLZfpkp5XM8)

Spot on - what a great project  :D :D :D
Title: Re: Chat
Post by: Randi on July 15, 2017, 06:05:15 pm
Whales feast when hatcheries release salmon (https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/science-ticker/whales-feast-when-hatcheries-release-salmon?tgt=nr)
Title: Re: Chat
Post by: AvastMH on July 15, 2017, 11:36:04 pm
Whales feast when hatcheries release salmon (https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/science-ticker/whales-feast-when-hatcheries-release-salmon?tgt=nr)

What a hoot - clever beasties those whales :D