Author Topic: 'prize crews' vs 'armed guards'  (Read 6781 times)

Thursday Next

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Re: 'prize crews' vs 'armed guards'
« Reply #15 on: March 05, 2011, 09:37:32 pm »
They do send lieutenants out boarding, but they seem to try not to lose them in charge of armed guards.  Although there's obviously a hierarchy among the lieutenants and a couple of them do get sent out now and then with the armed guards.  (On one occasion they did put a very senior officer in charge of the armed guard - but that was for the Kristianasfjord and the whole squadron was looking for her because they knew she had contraband on board and the captain had told all and sundry before departure that he was going to outrun the blockade!)  It's only really a particular couple of midshipmen that they use, and one of them has now been promoted to sub-lieutenant anyway. 

mutabilitie

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Re: 'prize crews' vs 'armed guards'
« Reply #16 on: March 05, 2011, 09:37:41 pm »
Also, I've just come across the first reference to the actual size of armed guards:
Quote
One officer & 2 men (Armed Guard "Ebro"") arrived on board.

Rogwherm

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Re: 'prize crews' vs 'armed guards'
« Reply #17 on: March 07, 2011, 09:56:01 am »
I'm working the Patuca and some time back I definitely noticed the change described in these posts.  Suddenly they were Armed Guards and not Prize Crews anymore.
I had always enjoyed reading the latter term, as it reminded me of the adventures of Patrick O'Brian's Captain Jack Aubrey and Doctor Stephen Maturin, aboard various Royal Navy vessels at the time of the Napoleonic wars.  Whenever an enemy ship was captured a prize crew was set aboard to steer her to the nearest allied port.  Each man on the capturing ship received a fixed fraction of the value of the prize ship, including head money for prisoners, and O'Brian loved to show each man totting up his share to the last fraction of a shilling.
Now, I don't suppose that kind of thing went on in the early 20th century ~ I guess the term was a vestige of former naval custom which the Admiralty finally decided to officially change.

Thursday Next

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Re: 'prize crews' vs 'armed guards'
« Reply #18 on: March 07, 2011, 02:06:43 pm »
Actually, I think they did still get "prize" money during WW1.  I was reading "Lost Voices of the Royal Navy" a while back, and at least one veteran remarked on what a welcome windfall the prize money he had received at the end of the war had been.  For all I know, they might still get it today, but it seems unlikely - I wonder when it stopped?

Janet Jaguar

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Re: 'prize crews' vs 'armed guards'
« Reply #19 on: March 08, 2011, 12:59:44 am »
They do still get it, according to Wiki, but it's evenly spread out to everyone whether or not they were present when the prize was captured.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prize_money