Author Topic: Ship laboring (sic)  (Read 3541 times)

Thursday Next

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Ship laboring (sic)
« on: March 07, 2011, 09:02:10 pm »
When the Mantua encounters rough weather she is always described as "laboring" (rather than "labouring" as I would have expected).  Is this a quirk of the Mantua's log-keeper?  Or was this the standard spelling a century ago?  How is it spelled in other logs?

I am just wondering if this is like "-ise/ize" where we in the UK were mostly brought up to believe that the American spelling was "wrong" - when in fact the American spelling was right all along and the English spelling "-ise" was actually a Victorian affectation.

mutabilitie

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Re: Ship laboring (sic)
« Reply #1 on: March 07, 2011, 09:26:32 pm »
When the Mantua encounters rough weather she is always described as "laboring" (rather than "labouring" as I would have expected).  Is this a quirk of the Mantua's log-keeper?  Or was this the standard spelling a century ago?  How is it spelled in other logs?

I am just wondering if this is like "-ise/ize" where we in the UK were mostly brought up to believe that the American spelling was "wrong" - when in fact the American spelling was right all along and the English spelling "-ise" was actually a Victorian affectation.
Sorry to be pedantic, but I spend quite a lot of time reading early modern texts, and I've found that that whole ' '-ize' is the spelling favoured by Shakespeare'-business is a bit of a myth. In 16th- and 17th-century texts, '-ise' and '-ize' are actually used interchangeably, and it's quite common to find both used within the same text (and ironically, early Shakespeare editions favour '-ise' over '-ize'). Maybe it wasn't properly standardised before the 19th century, but '-ise' forms were definitely around much earlier than that...

Anyway, regarding your actual question, from what I've seen, a lot of the log-writers aren't terribly good at spelling, so I'd say the most likely explanation would be that it's simply down to personal preference / not knowing any better.

DJ_59

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Re: Ship laboring (sic)
« Reply #2 on: March 08, 2011, 03:40:22 am »

We're all hillbillies over here, you know.   :P

mutabilitie

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Re: Ship laboring (sic)
« Reply #3 on: March 08, 2011, 07:54:20 am »

We're all hillbillies over here, you know.   :P
Sorry... The -ise/-ize thing just happens to be one of my pet peeves, so I can't not comment when I see it mentioned. :-[

I'll try to behave, I promise.

Kathy

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Re: Ship laboring (sic)
« Reply #4 on: March 08, 2011, 02:19:47 pm »
It is a shame we can't standardize our common language  :P ;D

Also, I have been wondering if any other Yanks are fighting the tendency to spell harbour as harbor (I'm sorry, I have pause a moment now - the spell checker thinks harbour is the incorrect spelling and keeps trying to get me to change it  :D :D :D :D  - now I wonder if a spell checker in England would have the same "reaction".)

yours -

Kathy W.

Helen J

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Re: Ship laboring (sic)
« Reply #5 on: March 08, 2011, 02:25:54 pm »
Quote
Also, I have been wondering if any other Yanks are fighting the tendency to spell harbour as harbor (I'm sorry, I have pause a moment now - the spell checker thinks harbour is the incorrect spelling and keeps trying to get me to change it  :D :D :D :D  - now I wonder if a spell checker in England would have the same "reaction".)
Yes, just the same bit in reverse - I keep getting caught out if I'm copying something from an American English text and my spell checker wants to put it into English English.

Helen J
« Last Edit: October 13, 2012, 03:29:44 am by Janet Jaguar »

Kathy

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Re: Ship laboring (sic)
« Reply #6 on: March 08, 2011, 02:32:02 pm »
 ;D ;D :D :D
well, I'll be chuckling about this one all day long!

I did have that in mind in my musings on the subject - if, just as an American spell checker objects to anglicized (I'm sorry, I just can't help myself  :D) spellings, an English spell checker would object to an Americanized (last one, I promise  ;) ) spelling
yours -

Kathy W.

(I guess what they say is true - it is all about location, location, location  ;D)
« Last Edit: March 08, 2011, 02:43:52 pm by wendolk »

Tegwen

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Re: Ship laboring (sic)
« Reply #7 on: March 08, 2011, 02:41:52 pm »
Re: (I guess what they say is true - it is all about location, location, location ;D)

We say that over here too!!!
K

DJ_59

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Re: Ship laboring (sic)
« Reply #8 on: March 08, 2011, 03:42:59 pm »

We're all hillbillies over here, you know.   :P
Sorry... The -ise/-ize thing just happens to be one of my pet peeves, so I can't not comment when I see it mentioned. :-[

I'll try to behave, I promise.


It's okay.  We all have our pet peeves.  One of my best friends is in Ottawa, and I love to bust his chops with parody of the o/u difference, like "Hi, Jouhn.  Houw are youu douing touday?"  And he likes to make fun of EVERYTHING about American English.
 




Thursday Next

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Re: Ship laboring (sic)
« Reply #9 on: March 08, 2011, 08:14:30 pm »
Back here in Pedants' Corner, mutabilitie, the "-ise/ize" thing is one of my pet peeves* too!  :D I don't believe spellings had been standardized back in Tudor times (hence Anne Boleyn/Bullen/Boleyne/Bulleyne and no doubt further variations).  The Oxford Dictionary gives the "-ize" spelling as correct - except (and since this is the English language of course there has to be an exception) if the word is derived from the French, such as "surprise" where the "s" is correct.  It's probably something academics have been arguing about for years and will likely continue to do so!

On the other hand, language is continuously evolving, and I was wondering if we were seeing this in action in the spelling of "laboring" back in 1915.

(* - not my biggest pet peeve though, which is "could of, should of" - that really has me jumping up and down screaming and tearing my hair out!)

mutabilitie

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Re: Ship laboring (sic)
« Reply #10 on: March 08, 2011, 09:50:26 pm »
(* - not my biggest pet peeve though, which is "could of, should of" - that really has me jumping up and down screaming and tearing my hair out!)
Yes, that's pretty bad. The only thing which makes me wince even more is 'bare with me', which always sounds like an encouragement to collective nudism...

DJ_59

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Re: Ship laboring (sic)
« Reply #11 on: March 08, 2011, 10:00:13 pm »

While "bear with me" sounds like a 911 call.

Tegwen

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Re: Ship laboring (sic)
« Reply #12 on: March 08, 2011, 10:07:26 pm »
or even a 999 call!!!!
K

DJ_59

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Re: Ship laboring (sic)
« Reply #13 on: March 08, 2011, 10:16:47 pm »

Really? 

Hey, now I understand why one of my favorite British punk bands chose the name 999. 

Tegwen

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Re: Ship laboring (sic)
« Reply #14 on: March 09, 2011, 09:20:19 am »
Hi DJ

Yes 999 is the UK equivalent of your 911.

999 the band werent on my radar but having looked them up on Wiki they seem to have been an interesting band. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/999_%28band%29, even if only for the applicants they rejected!!!!

The singer/guitarist was from Kilburn & the High Roads who I saw live while at Uni. Great stuff.

K