Author Topic: Worse things happen at sea  (Read 272974 times)

propriome

  • Shipherd
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1280
    • View Profile
Re: Worse things happen at sea
« Reply #2010 on: September 04, 2014, 11:20:44 pm »
Hi Kookaburra,

Second word seems "Launch" to me...

Kookaburra

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 248
  • Not all who wander are lost.
    • View Profile
Re: Worse things happen at sea
« Reply #2011 on: September 04, 2014, 11:39:07 pm »
Hi Kookaburra,

Second word seems "Launch" to me...

Yes - it meets the look and context.  I will update the page.  Thank you!

Randi

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12544
    • View Profile
Re: Worse things happen at sea
« Reply #2012 on: September 05, 2014, 07:12:09 am »
 ;D

Hanibal94

  • Shipherd
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4254
  • Better to do it, than live with the fear of it.
    • View Profile
Re: Worse things happen at sea
« Reply #2013 on: September 18, 2014, 04:09:21 pm »
On July 13th 1929, a crewman was discharged from the Pioneer for being 'incompatible':
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ow3/final/USCS%20Pioneer/Book%2030%20-%20July-September,%201929/IMG_0667_0.jpg

I know this refers to bad behavior, but that's not what crossed my mind when I first saw it:

"ERROR: John_Abbot.exe is not compatible with your operating system.
Please find a different seaman A.B. and install him instead."

Helen J

  • Editor and Shipherd
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4575
    • View Profile
Re: Worse things happen at sea
« Reply #2014 on: September 18, 2014, 05:13:51 pm »
 :D :D :D

Randi

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12544
    • View Profile
Re: Worse things happen at sea
« Reply #2015 on: September 18, 2014, 06:31:00 pm »
Quote
"ERROR: John_Abbot.exe is not compatible with your operating system.
Please find a different seaman A.B. and install him instead."

Nonetheless, that was effectively the problem, and no doubt what they did ;D

Janet Jaguar

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10205
  • Smell the sea, feel the sky, & fly into the mystic
    • View Profile
Re: Worse things happen at sea
« Reply #2016 on: September 18, 2014, 06:38:37 pm »

Hanibal94

  • Shipherd
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4254
  • Better to do it, than live with the fear of it.
    • View Profile
Re: Worse things happen at sea
« Reply #2017 on: September 18, 2014, 08:09:10 pm »
Nonetheless, that was effectively the problem, and no doubt what they did ;D

Yes, they did - the page says someone else got shipped.

P.S. Love that emoticon, Janet J!  :D 8)

leelaht

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1780
    • View Profile
Re: Worse things happen at sea
« Reply #2018 on: September 22, 2014, 01:45:37 am »
Bad things happen in port too...

Perry 29/10/1905, Seattle Washington
This day's watch was stood by Lieut JV Wild up to about 8:20 pm when according to best information, he left the vessel in uniform informing quartermaster that he was going up to the office (Moran Brothers) and that he would be back in a few minutes.  Quartermaster Mellick inferred that he was going to telephone.  He did not return at all, and after going off watch at midnight Quartermaster Mellick went to the office to enquire for Mr Wild.  Watchman said no officer had passed out the gate in uniform.  These facts were reported to me upon my arrival on board the morning of the 30th instant.  CE Johnston 1st Lieut.

Perry 30/10/1905, Seattle Washington (mid to 9 am)
No line officer on board during this watch.  Lieut JV Wild absent since 8:20 last night, and alarm was felt that he might have fallen off the dock.  Upon return of Captain and Executive Officer investigation was made and gear was prepared for dragging.  CE Johnston 1st Lieut.

Perry 30/10/1905, Seattle Washington (9am to 4pm)
Crew employed dragging in vacinity searching for remain of Lieut JV Wild.  At 2:45 recovered body of Lieut Wild about 150 ft from gang plank of ship in log basin on opposite side of wharf.  Coroner was notified and reviewed the remains about 3:15 after which they were removed to the establishment of the Boney-Watson Co undertakers. Examination revealed the fact that Lieut Wild struck his head in falling and that death was undoubtedly accidental.  Notified Captain JF Wild USRCS, father of deceased and the department of the facts by wire.

Janet Jaguar

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10205
  • Smell the sea, feel the sky, & fly into the mystic
    • View Profile
Re: Worse things happen at sea
« Reply #2019 on: September 22, 2014, 03:30:14 am »
According to the Register of Washington Deaths, King County and family trees at Ancestry.com:
     John V. Wild, born 1876, Revenue Cutter Service Officer
     Father Capt. John F. Wild USRCS, Mother "Mary" Catherine Rollins
     No spouse or children.  He pre-deceased his father.
     Buried at Saint Mary's City, Maryland, USA


Rest in Peace, John V. Wild

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=55445363&ref=acom

Janet Jaguar

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10205
  • Smell the sea, feel the sky, & fly into the mystic
    • View Profile
Re: Worse things happen at sea
« Reply #2020 on: September 22, 2014, 03:58:52 am »
According to the Register of Washington Deaths, King County and family trees at Ancestry.com:
     John V. Wild, born 1876, Revenue Cutter Service Officer
     Father Capt. John F. Wild USRCS, Mother "Mary" Catherine Rollins
     No spouse or children.  He pre-deceased his father.
     Buried at Saint Mary's City, Maryland, USA


Rest in Peace, John V. Wild

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=55445363&ref=acom


Attachment is from http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/
 The Seattle star., November 07, 1905, Night Edition, Page 4, Image 4


leelaht

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1780
    • View Profile
Re: Worse things happen at sea
« Reply #2021 on: September 27, 2014, 01:50:18 am »
more trouble on Perry Feb 13, 1906

About 2:00 Seaman B Ivanger complained that S Iwamoto, Cook, had struck him with a hatchet, inflicting a slight cut near left knee.  Wound dressed by executive officer.  S Iwamoto, Cook, complained that Seaman Ivanger had assaulted him and that he used hatchet in self defense.  Treated cook for contusion in neck.  Apparent misunderstanding with divided blame.

Janet Jaguar

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10205
  • Smell the sea, feel the sky, & fly into the mystic
    • View Profile
Re: Worse things happen at sea
« Reply #2022 on: September 27, 2014, 02:30:23 am »
Never make the mistake of thinking cooks are weak and unarmed.  The kitchen can be a very dangerous place to get insulting or violent and only the cook knows reflexively where all the sharp edges are. :o

Hanibal94

  • Shipherd
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4254
  • Better to do it, than live with the fear of it.
    • View Profile
Re: Worse things happen at sea
« Reply #2023 on: October 01, 2014, 12:14:49 pm »
Something new I just learned from OW: Rust-free paperclips apparently did not exist in the 1920s.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ow3/final/Unalga//Volumes/Seagate%20Backup%20Plus%20Drive/Arfon-JPEGS/RG26/UNALGA//b2575/b2575_023_1.jpg

Janet Jaguar

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10205
  • Smell the sea, feel the sky, & fly into the mystic
    • View Profile
Re: Worse things happen at sea
« Reply #2024 on: October 01, 2014, 03:02:50 pm »
All metal paperclips (antique and modern) are made of galvanized low carbon steel - low carbon because that kind of steel stays flexible.  The coating material varies, but it will always respond to the electric current magnetizing the steel.

The zinc or whatever coating applied during galvanization never rusts, but it is very thin and can be scraped off through the friction of use.  The thickness of the coating always varies some between production lots - the thinner the coating, the more likely there are microscopic places that failed to coat, particularly where the paperclip wire is in contact with itself.

Low carbon steel will always rust when exposed to water, and the rust will eat into the steel areas under remaining coating.  Stainless steel (high carbon with enough chromium or other metals included in the metal to resist rusting) is always hard and rigid, impossible to bend like a paperclip, and the higher the carbon content, the more rigid the steel gets.  Also, salt water is much more corrosive then fresh water.  Once paperclips lose their coating, they must be kept completely dry to remain useful.

[I worked for 2 years in a plating plant, a fascinating process.]