Author Topic: The Letters and Art of Old Weather  (Read 61282 times)

Kathy

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Re: The Letters and Art of Old Weather
« Reply #30 on: August 14, 2011, 04:30:44 am »
Last night, I watched the full moon shine on Millsite Lake - this is what came to me -

PEACE

The waves slap the boat against the dock,
the moonlight ripples on the water,
the wind blows the trees and water lilies.
Frogs croak and chirp and plop into the water.
Crickets sing and cicadas buzz,
and the loons call to each other across the lake.
Everything is in motion, everything is loud,
and yet...
I feel the peace of this place wrap around me like a blanket,
and I sigh, and hold that blanket tight around me,
and listen to the waves slapping the boat against the dock,
and watch the moonlight ripple on the water.

 

Janet Jaguar

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Re: The Letters and Art of Old Weather
« Reply #31 on: August 14, 2011, 04:39:26 am »
Thank you, Kathy - that is the sense of peace I found in the north Wisconsin woods.  Nature thriving and at peace.  I just could never say it.

Kathy

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Re: The Letters and Art of Old Weather
« Reply #32 on: August 19, 2011, 06:48:59 pm »
For the 2nd time, tragedy struck the Mantua - I felt compelled to jot down this elegy in memory of our loss -

Chocolate of the Mantua

Chocolate of the Mantua, chocolate of the Mantua,
tragic are the days you went overboard.
Chocolate of the Mantua, chocolate of the Mantua,
I thank my lucky stars I have a hoard.

Chocolate of the Mantua, chocolate of the Mantua,
50 pounds of rich brown luscious gold.
Chocolate of the Mantua, chocolate of the Mantua,
sweet and creamy, and just a little bold.

Chocolate of the Mantua, chocolate of the Mantua,
you are truly missed!
Chocolate of the Mantua, chocolate of the Mantua,
if I'd been there, I'd been royally pissed!

« Last Edit: September 27, 2011, 01:07:45 pm by wendolk »

Helen J

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Re: The Letters and Art of Old Weather
« Reply #33 on: August 19, 2011, 06:51:01 pm »
I join you in your mourning - and congratulate you on the elegance of your elegy (now where's my own supply?.  Must just check it's safe ....)

Bunting Tosser

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Re: The Letters and Art of Old Weather
« Reply #34 on: August 19, 2011, 10:03:38 pm »
That is so moving.
It must have been laxative chocolate.


Kathy

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Re: The Letters and Art of Old Weather
« Reply #35 on: August 19, 2011, 10:04:35 pm »
har har  :P

Kathy

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Re: The Letters and Art of Old Weather
« Reply #36 on: September 06, 2011, 01:35:11 pm »
Something for Owen and Cadi (Arfon's daughter):

Sleep, Sweet Little One, Sleep

Close your eyes little one,
the day is now done,
and it is time for all to sleep.

We will rock you to sleep
say the waves soft and sweet.
Come rest in our arms,
we'll keep you safe from all harm,
sleep, sweet little one, sleep.

We will sing you to sleep
say the whales in the deep.
Just hear our sea tune,
and your eyes will close soon,
sleep, sweet little one, sleep.

We will keep your dreams fair,
say the wandering light airs.
Hush now, don't cry,
a new day draws nigh,
sleep, sweet little one, sleep.


Bunting Tosser

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Re: The Letters and Art of Old Weather
« Reply #37 on: September 06, 2011, 02:24:55 pm »
Very evocative, it brought a tear.

"Hush now, don't cry,
a new day draws nigh,
sleep, sweet little one, sleep."

The number of times I thought something similar as dawn approached; and dawn is quite late in December.

Kathy

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Re: The Letters and Art of Old Weather
« Reply #38 on: September 06, 2011, 02:40:07 pm »
thanks - now that my babies aren't babies any longer, I find myself sometimes missing that stage  :(

no back talk, no arguing...

Bunting Tosser

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Re: The Letters and Art of Old Weather
« Reply #39 on: September 06, 2011, 03:16:01 pm »

no back talk, no arguing...


... no sleep.

jennfurr

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Re: The Letters and Art of Old Weather
« Reply #40 on: September 09, 2011, 01:47:36 pm »

no back talk, no arguing...


... no sleep.

oh so very much of no sleep... :yawn:

Kathy

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Re: The Letters and Art of Old Weather
« Reply #41 on: September 09, 2011, 02:31:53 pm »
I was very lucky with my first - she stopped sleeping during the day fairly quickly and slept during the night - not so with the 2nd one  ;D

Kathy

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Re: The Letters and Art of Old Weather
« Reply #42 on: September 27, 2011, 01:07:24 pm »
EDITOR'S NOTE:  After reading the Elegy du Chocolate  ;D, my husband thought I should clear up a possible bit of confusion for my British brothers and sisters.  In British English, as I am now given to under stand, to be pissed is to be intoxicated.  Here in the US, to be pissed means to be angry, and royally pissed means extremely so.  I hope this makes the last line of that cri du coeur more meaningful for my overseas cousins.

Kathy W.

Kathy

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Re: The Letters and Art of Old Weather
« Reply #43 on: September 27, 2011, 01:14:16 pm »
I live in an area with a great deal of light pollution and also haze from the humidity, but some nights, especially in the Fall and Winter, we can really see the stars.  Last night was such a night.

Stars

The sun sets and they appear -
my companions, my guides.
They are as familiar to me as the
smile of my baby or the
brow of my wife.
When we laugh, they dance and twinkle.
When we rage, they glitter like polished steel.
They are the roads in this place with no roads.
With their help, I can go anywhere,
even back home.

Bunting Tosser

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Re: The Letters and Art of Old Weather
« Reply #44 on: September 27, 2011, 01:33:34 pm »
EDITOR'S NOTE:  After reading the Elegy du Chocolate  ;D, my husband thought I should clear up a possible bit of confusion for my British brothers and sisters.  In British English, as I am now given to under stand, to be pissed is to be intoxicated.  Here in the US, to be pissed means to be angry, and royally pissed means extremely so.  I hope this makes the last line of that cri du coeur more meaningful for my overseas cousins.

Kathy W.


Your definition is, as one would expect, correct, but not a complete treatment of the expression.
The American usage is a cut down version of the British usage where "pissed off" indicates extreme irritation.
It gives me no pleasure  ;D to employ such a coarse term in this august company. I do so merely as a point of clarification.
As an aside, I did, briefly, wonder whether you were indicating a preference for liqueur chocolates.