Author Topic: HMS Moth  (Read 3486 times)

zoot horn rollo

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HMS Moth
« on: October 20, 2010, 05:38:40 pm »
A river gunboat (which will eventually go out to China with Bluebell, Colombo, Hollyhock and others in 1920), Moth has just been towed from Sheerness to Chatham and on the 7th June 1919 the crews has left the ship to go to accomodation in Royal Naval Barracks Chatham with sentries left on the ship.

End of weather reports for some time...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Moth_%281915%29

Wow, this looks like an interesting vessel to follow. Scuttled by the RN and then refloated by the Japanese Navy....
« Last Edit: October 20, 2010, 05:45:01 pm by zoot horn rollo »

navalhistory

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Re: HMS Moth
« Reply #1 on: October 20, 2010, 05:44:51 pm »
I know this is not exciting stuff, but to have detailed information on such a little known vessel as a river gunboat, is a real breakthrough in WW1 naval history.

Similar detail for river gunboats up the Iraqi and Chinese rivers should be quite fascinating.

Gordon

zoot horn rollo

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Re: HMS Moth
« Reply #2 on: October 20, 2010, 05:46:43 pm »
Presumably she is in for refit prior to going to Russia.

I love this, forget the battle cruisers and major ships of the line - bring on the river gun boats and sloops!

navalhistory

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Re: HMS Moth
« Reply #3 on: October 20, 2010, 06:38:41 pm »
Couldn't agree more. In the old navy, anything bigger than a destroyer was all bull - spit and polish. I like the smaller vessels. My particular fascination is with the hired trawlers and drifters. Hard-working vessels, usually crewed by their original fishermen and with a sprinkling of navy men to introduce a bit of naval discipline. Out day after day in all weathers, patrolling, sweeping for mines, rescuing crews and salvaging ships, and occasionally disappearing without trace.

Gordon

zoot horn rollo

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Re: HMS Moth
« Reply #4 on: October 20, 2010, 08:51:39 pm »
Presumably she is in for refit prior to going to Russia.

I love this, forget the battle cruisers and major ships of the line - bring on the river gun boats and sloops!

Update on the Moth. The crew paid off in June 1919 and a care and maintenance crew came on board. A new log book has started 9th January 1920 with the vessel having moved back to Sheerness. Interestingly (this being the first log book I have seen from the start) the log book gives details of the type and maker of the barometer and thermometer and their locations.

zoot horn rollo

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Re: HMS Moth
« Reply #5 on: October 20, 2010, 09:24:28 pm »
Why would the crew be embarking sand ballast?  ???

navalhistory

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Re: HMS Moth
« Reply #6 on: October 20, 2010, 10:42:31 pm »
The Admiralty Manual of Seamanship 1916 has a section on met instruments and their use - see http://www.naval-history.net/OxonMet.htm

Sand ballast - ship's needed ballast to ensure they floated at the right design depth (that's probably not the right phrase). I've heard of stone, pig iron, and I think lead ballast, but not sand. But why not?

Gordon

zoot horn rollo

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Re: HMS Moth
« Reply #7 on: October 21, 2010, 07:54:32 am »
I can understand the rational but I would have thought that, bar major modifications such as removing a gun turret, loading ballast would be a one time operation prior to the ship being handed over by the builders.

Having said that, the previous log book did mention them removing the forward gun mounting. I wonder if the refit involved a major change in the vessel's buoyancy. Or possibly making the ship temporarily heavier for the journey to China - it being a river gun boat after all.

zoot horn rollo

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Re: HMS Moth
« Reply #8 on: October 21, 2010, 09:07:09 am »
And thinking more about it, as I cycled into work, using sand as temporary ballast to make the vessel sit deeper in the water (and presumably make it more stable in rough conditions given that it is a river gun boat) would make some sense as you could then remove the sand ballast when you got to China. I wonder  if we will see the ballast being removed later on in the logs?

badskittler

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Re: HMS Moth
« Reply #9 on: October 21, 2010, 10:59:19 am »
Presumably she will displace less in salt water than fresh water.

zoot horn rollo

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Re: HMS Moth
« Reply #10 on: October 21, 2010, 12:15:09 pm »
Now that's a point I hadn't thought of.

However, she has just come back from the White Russian campaign which presumably meant a sea voyage down the Baltic and North Sea so I would have thought that additional ballasting would have been done already.

zoot horn rollo

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Re: HMS Moth
« Reply #11 on: October 21, 2010, 09:31:11 pm »
Hah! We are off and running with the flotilla underway on the long transit to China.

We are currently astern of 'Bluebell' which is really interesting for me having transcribed data from Bluebell for part of this journey as well!