Author Topic: What Armistice?  (Read 12101 times)

Bunting Tosser

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Re: What Armistice?
« Reply #15 on: November 09, 2011, 02:13:04 am »
However, on 14th, wild parties and fireworks were reported here: http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-45496/ADM%2053-45496-010_0.jpg

Very surprised to only see 6 ratings placed under sentry's charge on their return from liberty.... Not trying hard enough in my opinion!

Do you suppose the captain demonstrated his version of "the Nelson Touch"? In this case, turning a blind eye? Except for those matelots who couldn't get back under their own steam.

Tegwen

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Re: What Armistice?
« Reply #16 on: November 09, 2011, 09:26:31 am »
HMS Juno, somewhere off Aden/Djibouti (I think, as she left there on 10th). 11am on 11 November 1918 came and went with nothing but a series of weather reports and course changes & bearings in the log. link : http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-45496/ADM%2053-45496-008_1.jpg

Jungle Telegraph was obviously not working, although as Captain & Officers visited Governor of Djibouti on 10th, he could have given them some advance info as by then the Armistice was expected.

However, on 14th, wild parties and fireworks were reported here: http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-45496/ADM%2053-45496-010_0.jpg

Very surprised to only see 6 ratings placed under sentry's charge on their return from liberty.... Not trying hard enough in my opinion!

Thanks for this Gixernutter. Good to see that Odin was involved. I dont remember any of this from her logs, but perhaps it is just senility on my part.

Carrie32

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Re: What Armistice?
« Reply #17 on: November 20, 2011, 04:27:22 pm »
On HMS Cornwall we did dress the ship on Armistice Day 1918 but no mention of why. But on the 28th June 1919 when "Peace was signed with Germany" (Treaty of Versailles) we had "All hands Spliced the Mainbrace".
 http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-38701/ADM%2053-38701-087_0.jpg

Jeff

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Re: What Armistice?
« Reply #18 on: January 11, 2012, 03:55:03 am »
HMS Caesar marked the signing of the peace treaty in June 1919:

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-36596/0017_0.jpg

They dressed ship the next day.

Steeleye

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Re: What Armistice?
« Reply #19 on: January 17, 2012, 09:54:33 am »
On HMS Glory, guard ship at Murmansk, not a mention of anything out of the ordinary on the 11th ... or on the 12th, 13th or 14th.  I confess that I'm not sure how messages would have been sent to northern Russia in 1918 - can anyone enlighten me?  I know that there was a British Consulate in Murmansk at the time.

I was also 'on board' the HMS Lancaster in November 1918 - she was in Esquimault, British Columbia at the time - not a mention of the war ending in her logs either.
 ???

(Edited later)  On 17 November, the log of HMS Glory notes:
'Hands marched past Admiral Green.'
https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-43039/ADM%2053-43039-222_1.jpg

It's possible that this was done to celebrate the armistice, as they have not done a march past at any other time on the Glory that I've seen.  Also at about this time, they stopped 'darkening ship' in the evening.  A few days later, a Lieutenant Wood (who had gone missing ashore some time previously) and 41 ratings were discharged for passage to England.  A range of inconclusive points indicating that they were winding back from a war footing, although they were still part of the 'Russian Intervention'.
« Last Edit: January 18, 2012, 02:15:11 am by Steeleye »

Janet Jaguar

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Re: What Armistice?
« Reply #20 on: January 17, 2012, 04:24:45 pm »
Lots of ships logged notice of this, more seem to have ignored it in the logs.  I don't know why.

But all these ships had "wireless telegraphy" - long distance radio that transmitted morse code, not voice.  I do not know how long that distance is, but do not at all doubt that every radio operator hearing about an armistice would have eagerly relayed it onward.

Helen J

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Re: What Armistice?
« Reply #21 on: January 17, 2012, 07:12:00 pm »
According to my present Old Weather reading, Julian Thompson's Imperial War Museum Book of the War at Sea 1914-18 (which I highly recommend) wireless communication had a number of limitations.  For example, direct communication between London and British ships in South American waters wasn't possible.  If the Admiralty wanted to communicate with a ship off the East coast of South America they had to send a cable to Montevideo in Uruguay, from where it was then transmitted by wireless to the Falklands, and then re-transmitted to ships at sea; and replies had to come by the same route.
On the west coast of South America it wasn't possible to communicate with the Falklands because of atmospheric conditions caused by the Andes; Chile was a neutral country and so coded signals couldn't be sent to wireless stations there.  The Admiralty sent signals to British consuls, and ships had to be diverted to go and collect them.
I expect it was all rather easier nearer to home!

Randi

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Re: What Armistice?
« Reply #22 on: January 17, 2012, 07:19:27 pm »
Thanks for the explanation 8)

JamesAPrattIII

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Re: What Armistice?
« Reply #23 on: January 19, 2012, 09:43:21 pm »
It also needs to be pointed out that depending on atmospheric conditions a message to a shipon the east coast of South America could take anywhere from several hours to two days to reach them and visa versa. I believe the average ships radio back then had a range of about 150 miles. As for submarines they had to surface and set up their wireless aerials as they called them in order to send and recieve messages. I think it was in the fall of 1916where the RN was able to equip a submarine with a radio that could transmit from the german coast to England. it should also be pointed out that many merchant ships and smaller warships did not have radio sets at the start of WW I.

Caro

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Re: What Armistice?
« Reply #24 on: February 15, 2012, 10:47:52 pm »
HMS Hyacinth November 11, 1918  Simonstown

1.30 Received official news of signature of armistice between Germany and allies
1.33 Fired 3 guns
1.40 Dressed ship

Well done Hyacinth.  ;D

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-44644/ADM%2053-44644-278_1.jpg

h.kohler

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Re: What Armistice?
« Reply #25 on: March 15, 2012, 11:15:33 am »
November 11th 1920 H.M.S. Veronica observed two minutes of silence.

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-89883/0127_0.jpg

HebesDad

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Re: What Armistice?
« Reply #26 on: March 15, 2012, 12:50:37 pm »
Somewhat related - one TB36 in August 1914 both mobilisation and declaration of war were logged. No all I have to do is hang in there until 1918 and see if they log the armistice

jil

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Re: What Armistice?
« Reply #27 on: March 16, 2012, 05:19:40 pm »
November 11th 1921 HMS Moorhen observed 2 minutes silence

https://s3.amazonaws.com/oldweather/ADM53-80943/008_1.jpg

Janet Jaguar

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Re: What Armistice?
« Reply #28 on: March 17, 2012, 05:57:57 am »
Somewhat related - one TB36 in August 1914 both mobilisation and declaration of war were logged. No all I have to do is hang in there until 1918 and see if they log the armistice

On the sloop Torch (our logs turned out to be for two different ships named 'Torch'), this is what happened:
On 7th August 1914, HMS Torch noted in their logs for the first time that they are "Preparing for war" and after dark, "Darkened ship" and later "Manned and armed ship".  They continued on their stated voyage to Suva, Fiji.

On 9th August 1914, they changed course in the early morning hours and headed for New Zealand.

On 14th August 1914, (yes, it took that long - this lovely little tall ship is not fast :) ) Torch arrived in Aukland harbour.  She immediately discharged ammunition.  Also discharged to different ships were 3 of her senior officers and a "large proportion of ship's company".  Immediately embarked were 2 officers, replacing some of the loss.  The whole navy is obviously preparing itself for war.

19th Century sailing ships weren't fit for that war, so she was decommissioned and turned over to New Zealand.  That simple statement interrupted and changed her mission in the islands.  NZ navy ended up using her as a training ship.

Tegwen

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Re: What Armistice?
« Reply #29 on: March 17, 2012, 11:01:06 am »
Odin got a new coat of paint at the start of the war.

http://forum.oldweather.org/index.php?topic=1397.msg14686#msg14686