Author Topic: Encyclopaedia Britannica  (Read 1083 times)

szukacz

  • Shipherd
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 617
    • View Profile
Encyclopaedia Britannica
« on: March 17, 2012, 08:23:40 am »
Is this the sign of the times?
End of release paper.
Is it good or bad? I do not know.

Caro

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7444
  • Our end is Life. Put out to sea. Louis MacNeice
    • View Profile
Re: Encyclopaedia Britannica
« Reply #1 on: March 17, 2012, 08:54:32 am »
It is sad that the Encyclopaedia will no longer be available in a printed version after almost 250 years.
It would be sadder if it disappeared completely, so maybe this is necessary for its survival.

Janet Jaguar

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10166
  • Smell the sea, feel the sky, & fly into the mystic
    • View Profile
Re: Encyclopaedia Britannica
« Reply #2 on: March 17, 2012, 12:38:45 pm »
I know lots of people - me included - who will pay $70 a year for access to that rich a source.

There is no way on earth I could afford $1400 for the set on paper.  I only wish they would make a few library editions printed.

Kathy

  • Editor
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2761
  • In the beginning was the sea...
    • View Profile
Re: Encyclopaedia Britannica
« Reply #3 on: March 17, 2012, 01:30:41 pm »
we have an old set that my husband's parents bought years ago.  We still just sit and read from it on occasion.  My parents got an Encyclopedia Americana.  I have a Nook and I love it, but for learning about things I'm interested in, I'll take a book any day!

Janet Jaguar

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10166
  • Smell the sea, feel the sky, & fly into the mystic
    • View Profile
Re: Encyclopaedia Britannica
« Reply #4 on: March 17, 2012, 03:22:52 pm »
There's a whole series of novels, the 1632 series started by Eric Flint and the Grantville Gazette anthologies (something like 30 ebooks!) about a small West Virginian coal town that gets thrown back to 1631 in central Europe, right in the middle of the 30 years war.  They have a 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica that becomes property of the state and is frantically needed to inform them all who is ruling what and why back then, and what they will have to cope with.  It is referred to so extensively, it has become a kind of character in the stories in its own right.

They went with the 1911 edition for 3 reasons:
  • It really was on the shelves of the high school library in the real town the author used as his model for Grantville.
  • It is one of the best encyclopedias ever for older history details, with lots of mention of things happening in the 17th century.  Newer editions had to prune that out to make way for the 20th century's explosion of new things.
  • It is old enough, the copyright has completely expired. ;D

It is a very interesting use of unbelievably good material to build an alternate universe.