Author Topic: What does this mean?  (Read 11574 times)

Randi

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Re: What does this mean?
« Reply #45 on: July 29, 2012, 12:39:47 pm »
« Last Edit: July 29, 2012, 12:56:29 pm by randi_2 »

jil

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Re: What does this mean?
« Reply #46 on: July 29, 2012, 01:14:24 pm »
Thanks, Randi. From that Torpedo looks likely - I love the crossed torpedoes on their badge!

jil

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Re: What does this mean?
« Reply #47 on: August 05, 2012, 02:54:51 pm »
I've got a 'Mate(E)' now - is that engineer?

At 9am http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM53-32689/ADM53-32689-186_0.jpg

Randi

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Re: What does this mean?
« Reply #48 on: August 05, 2012, 03:08:49 pm »

jil

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Re: What does this mean?
« Reply #49 on: August 06, 2012, 10:20:39 am »
Randi, thanks, again!

Karijn

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Re: What does this mean?
« Reply #50 on: August 26, 2012, 11:53:52 am »
Ha, topic captured and re-used.
Sandpiper has a lot of mentioning of a word that is either camber or cumber, can't tell from the handwriting. Cumber does not appear to exist in a relevant fashion, camber appears to be "a measure of lateral main deck curvature in naval architecture. The curve is applied to a deck transversely" according to Wiki.
But the way my logkeeper uses it, it says "Secured alongside HMS Moorhen in Camber" and stuff like that, they are usually 'in camber'.
What is it? Should it be capitalized? The logkeeper capitalizes it, but he capitalizes *everything*.
I usually just transcribe it, but I would hate to find out that it was, say, cumber after all.  Check doublecheck!

Randi

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Re: What does this mean?
« Reply #51 on: August 26, 2012, 12:14:11 pm »
Here's a definition I found.


I have seen it used in reference to the torpedo boat depot in Kowloon as in 'naval camber '. It refers to an enclosure formed by the breakwaters.


But any sea area surrounded by breakwaters can be referred to as a camber, such as the Port of Dover.

On HMS Mutine, I spent a lot of time "Alongside in North Camber Bermuda Dockyard"
http://www.geographic.org/geographic_names/name.php?uni=64766&fid=505&c=bermuda
http://www.gwpda.org/naval/dkbkpl14.jpg

Karijn

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Re: What does this mean?
« Reply #52 on: August 26, 2012, 12:15:39 pm »
So I have been editing it right all along. Thank you Randi!

Janet Jaguar

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Re: What does this mean?
« Reply #53 on: August 26, 2012, 05:58:53 pm »
In Hong Kong harbor (HMS Otter) they use 'camber' to indicate temporary docks made with floating breakwaters or buffers as opposed to permanent structures.

Dean

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Re: What does this mean?
« Reply #54 on: August 27, 2012, 12:37:56 am »
Ha, topic captured and re-used.
Sandpiper has a lot of mentioning of a word that is either camber or cumber, can't tell from the handwriting. Cumber does not appear to exist in a relevant fashion, ....
I usually just transcribe it, but I would hate to find out that it was, say, cumber after all.  Check doublecheck!

It's likely 'camber' but if it WAS 'cumber' just add a cloud (Cu) and make salad :P ;)

Karijn

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Re: What does this mean?
« Reply #55 on: August 27, 2012, 12:22:31 pm »
 :D

And thank you Janet, that'll help me quite a bit in understanding the Hong Kong harbour.