Author Topic: Is it in the transcribing or the ships?  (Read 1994 times)

Karijn

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Is it in the transcribing or the ships?
« on: June 06, 2012, 12:47:42 pm »
Just for my curiosity.

What is it for you that makes this so much fun?

Imagine the experience was pretty much the same. Nice people, nice forum, good looking site and (very important for me) a way to keep track as to how we are doing. Active feedback and updates an gratefulness from the organizers (love that too by the way :) ).
Only they rename it Old Everything and instead of logs we would transcribe old letters or stockbooks or diaries or something.

Would you still frequent it?

I like transcribing and figuring out handwriting, and I love history. But I am not particulary interested in naval history. Quite on the contrary, in fact.
Yet I am having a blast here. But I can imagine that it is the other way around for a lot of you guys.


cyzaki

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Re: Is it in the transcribing or the ships?
« Reply #1 on: June 06, 2012, 12:51:03 pm »
It started off being the ships. I followed the Laurentic for its entire voyage, and that got me hooked.

But I've not found a ship that's interested me as much since. And yet, as you say, it remains addictive. I think it'd because it's something I can do with minimal thinking for most of the time - putting in weather codes is pretty automatic now. But every now and again something exciting pops up!

AvastMH

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Re: Is it in the transcribing or the ships?
« Reply #2 on: June 06, 2012, 01:07:54 pm »
Just happened to see it advertised on the University's webpage. I work at Oxford, and they were advertising Zooniverse. I spotted the Old Weather project because the academic I work with is Myles Allen who runs (with others) Climatepredict.net.  My dad had been in the navy so that sort of rang a bell as well.  I realized that it was something simple that I could do to try to help save the planet.

I've only been on here about 5 weeks and I've already volunteered to test the alternate database of interesting facts, and have set up with BOINC OW.

The simplicity of entering the details, the novelty of learning about another working world, the adventures, the funny bits (98lb of beef lost overboard  ::) ) are addictive in themselves. But all in all it's the sense of community with my boat, and even more so with the OW family, that keeps me glued to the project.  ;)
All the best,
Ava
« Last Edit: June 06, 2012, 08:49:35 pm by AvastMH »

Janet Jaguar

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Re: Is it in the transcribing or the ships?
« Reply #3 on: June 06, 2012, 01:08:38 pm »
For me, it's the ships and the community.  And a chance to learn more about geography and history and naval stuff and climatology.  And the sense of travel to all corners of the globe.  And the sense of helping an important science.

I don't know why exactly, like you I'm a landlubber with no particular love of history or navy. Before this, not now.  I've tried a couple of other transcribing sites - briefly.  But either they were numbers only, or lacked community, or some other mystical factor.  But they didn't 'grab' me.

Helen J

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Re: Is it in the transcribing or the ships?
« Reply #4 on: June 06, 2012, 07:47:16 pm »
I didn't have any particular interest in naval history - I just heard about the project and was interested because it would be helping climate change scientists.
But I have got totally hooked on the whole experience - the weather, the other events, the forum - and I think it's the combination of all the elements which makes it work for me.  Certainly the human interest in the logs helps - I found myself getting really worried when one of my ships was going through the period of the Spanish flu, and the numbers on the sick list kept going up.  But when nothing at all is happening on board I can still feel that the weather data is valuable; and might perhaps be able to offer some help on the forum in return for all the help I've received with terrible handwriting or naval jargon.

Randi

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Re: Is it in the transcribing or the ships?
« Reply #5 on: June 06, 2012, 08:32:27 pm »
Same here.
I thought it would be boring (and sometimes it is!), but I wanted to help the climate change scientists.
I find the logs interesting, but the best part is the OW family.

Craig

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Re: Is it in the transcribing or the ships?
« Reply #6 on: June 06, 2012, 11:40:01 pm »
Same for me as for Helenj and Randi. I heard about Zooniverse on a CBC (Canada - there's also one in the Caribbean) program and it intrigued me. I wasn't much interested in classifying galaxies or whale sounds but doing something for climate change was right up my alley. In my work for a statistical agency I used to analyze data captured by others but I came to realize that the whole process was important, not just the analysis. This is why I don't mind typing in the data. In any case, I wouldn't be much use in climate modeling. And I can't say it's boring because each log page is a challenge - especially resisting the temptation to second guess the log keeper.  ;D

And the real treat is comparing notes and sharing anecdotes with the others on the forum. I notice there are many transcribers who ignore the Forum and they are missing most of the fun.

Craig

Tegwen

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Re: Is it in the transcribing or the ships?
« Reply #7 on: June 07, 2012, 10:38:01 am »
For me the history, even the tiny details of it are the most important. That is why I have moved from transcribing to editing the histories, of the ships I transcribed. I would still do some transcription if there was no editing, but I need to feel a link to the ship to put a huge effort into that. There was something extra special about being captain, so being the first person to work on each page rather than seeing the interesting things come up on the forum before you actually get to transcribe it.

Also I found about it at a time when I was unemployed and it helped emotionally then. Since then it has helped as a displacement activity through some very difficult times so I will keep going on it.

Dean

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Re: Is it in the transcribing or the ships?
« Reply #8 on: June 08, 2012, 01:06:01 am »
It's a bit of lots of things for me. I found out about OW when reading an article in Scientific American in Feb. It sounded interesting so I logged in and got addicted.  ;D  I'm kind of a 'weather weenie' after teaching General Science in a Middle School for 38 years. I also daily record snow/rain/temperature, etc. for the National Weather Service and have been part of a weather study with the Univ of Colorado for several years.

Check it out at www. CoCoRaHS.org  - if you want to see my data - my Station ID is NY - NG - 2.

I'm also a sailor and have been for 42 years on Lake Ontario. I have a 27 foot Bristol/Alberg sailboat which I have owned for 33.

This place is so cool! ESPECIALLY all the wonderful people I have met! I usually check out the FORUM before I start my transcribing and look to see what's new! Great place!  Thanks all for having me! :-*

Now - off to transcribe! ;)

Hanibal94

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Re: Is it in the transcribing or the ships?
« Reply #9 on: June 08, 2012, 08:59:48 am »
I heard about this project on BBC back when it was launched in October 2010. I got started on HMS Bee, got bored and wandered around, then decided to focus on just one ship till it was done, and got into the habit of taking ships close to completion (but where I can still make the top 11) and finishing them. I still enjoy pressing the "Finish" button on the very last page and seeing another ship done and out (I'm doing HMS Iphigenia right now).
Somehow, it took me half a year to discover the forum.

studentforever

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Re: Is it in the transcribing or the ships?
« Reply #10 on: June 21, 2012, 06:02:38 pm »
Just got back from holiday and am getting up to date with my OW news. I now mainly do ship histories which involves a lot of log reading since my transcribers have been parsimonious with their event recording. My geography is improving and I've learned a lot of history in passing, as it were.
I love the sense of community in OW, the whacky sense of humour of some contributors, and so many people have helped to decode some of the entries.
I'll probably go back to transcribing when I start my new adult education course in the autumn - ship history is just too addictive.
So, sometimes I'm contributing to science, sometimes to history and having fun all/most of the time.