Author Topic: Rodgers -- Discussion: Questions and Comments  (Read 27055 times)

olems

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Re: Rodgers -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #165 on: February 03, 2013, 09:59:56 pm »
Yeah, my guess is about two days sailing WNW of Serdze-Kamen, which was apparently the crew's best guess as well.

From the sighting of the river to landfall and dropping off Master Putnam they travelled for two days at ca 5 knots tacking NE and SE against the wind. So anywhere between 50-150 nm along the coast from Serdze-Kamen.

To their defense, not sure there are a lot of landmarks to note in the area. On the other hand it doesn't help that they seem to consider the native settlements as local fauna. When they set up the camp for Putnam, the fact that there were "a great many natives" present is mentioned with about the same interest as a walrus and some whales.

I never heard of Water Sky - is my photo that, and what color is Ice Blink?  I'm not surprised if I got them confused.
http://nsidc.org/arcticmet/basics/phenomena/water_sky.html

AvastMH

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Re: Rodgers -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #166 on: February 03, 2013, 11:02:45 pm »
That's a very interesting web site Olems! I read this: http://nsidc.org/arcticmet/quickfacts/mirage_mistakes.html because I seem to recall something about possible mirages on the forum the other day.

Janet Jaguar

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Re: Rodgers -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #167 on: February 04, 2013, 01:04:10 am »
OK, ice blink is white, not yellow as some sources stated.  And water sky is dark.  So what was that yellow glare in my found photo?

« Last Edit: June 03, 2013, 12:16:28 am by Janet Jaguar »

Kevin

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Re: Rodgers -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #168 on: February 04, 2013, 01:36:39 am »
Well, I've never seen ice blink that dramatic looking. Usually a white glare on the horizon like the NSIDC example. Not to say it couldn't look like that...but...where is the sun?

Janet Jaguar

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Re: Rodgers -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #169 on: February 04, 2013, 01:42:56 am »
I don't know.  I'd seen captions where someone said ice blink was yellow, so I went with this NASA pic.  Olems' page gave me more authoritative pictures so I just changed them.  Part of what happens when a totally urban landlubber is trying to illustrate the arctic wilderness.  I'm really glad to have an expert here. :)

These are the pics now in use from Olems site:



« Last Edit: June 03, 2013, 12:12:42 am by Janet Jaguar »

Randi

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Re: Rodgers -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #170 on: February 04, 2013, 07:56:21 am »
That's a very interesting web site Olems! I read this: http://nsidc.org/arcticmet/quickfacts/mirage_mistakes.html because I seem to recall something about possible mirages on the forum the other day.
I was thinking of that too - a mirage (http://forum.oldweather.org/index.php?topic=3338.msg60394#msg60394) was mentioned as an explanation for "A faint gleam of sunlight was visible in Northern horizon at 1 and 2 AM. And at 4 a ruddy tint was to be seen on horizon to NNE. " (http://forum.oldweather.org/index.php?topic=3338.msg60317#msg60317).

Kevin

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Re: Rodgers -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #171 on: February 04, 2013, 08:26:41 pm »
Here is the best satellite view of the area the Rodgers was in...very, very few clear passes this time of year (in fact this is in November 2011). Confirms my own experience with cloudy/foggy weather here and suggests no surprise there are so few positions given in the logbook. You can see lots of (dis)colored water though, from various sources. 

AvastMH

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Re: Rodgers -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #172 on: February 04, 2013, 10:10:22 pm »
Looks cold.....bbbbrrrrrr! Thanks for the view :D
The discoloured water fascinates me though.

Janet Jaguar

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Re: Rodgers -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #173 on: February 04, 2013, 11:26:16 pm »
Looking at the pattern of discoloring, I'm guessing the rivers continue out into the sea as strong currents.  Very interesting.

Kevin

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Re: Rodgers -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #174 on: February 05, 2013, 04:12:22 am »
River discharge is a common reason for discolored water, though where it ultimately goes depends on the wind. Often the Yukon discharge joins the Alaska coasta current and flows northward through Bering Strait. The Mackenzie discharge plume, on the other hand, sometimes blows East, sometimes West. There can be a mix of plumes of different age superimposed on each other, so to speak. I think this is the case on the Siberian coast where alongshore currents are frequently wind-driven. Phytoplankton blooms are another cause, especially in the spring. http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=588

AvastMH

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Re: Rodgers -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #175 on: February 05, 2013, 09:15:26 pm »
Just finished 15th Nov for those waiting to decommission The Rodgers.

AvastMH

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Re: Rodgers -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #176 on: February 06, 2013, 09:03:32 am »
Reality finally comes to rest in the heads of the lovelorn sailors of the Rodgers:

4 to 8 pm: Very disagreeable weather
8 to midnight: A severe night

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ow3/USS%20Rodgers/Rodgers_1881/b001of010_0176_1.jpg

It MUST have been bad for them to complain (well it was squally snow in 30+ mph winds - I would have complained  ::))

Janet Jaguar

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Re: Rodgers -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #177 on: February 06, 2013, 11:35:08 am »
Storms tipping over the line into being a genuine blizzard are always worthy of complaint and respect. :)

AvastMH

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Re: Rodgers -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #178 on: February 08, 2013, 07:25:05 pm »
The poets have a natural phenomena moment:

Very brilliant and grand display of the aurora - the brightest part in the NW.
The light extended from the E. to W. by N., and to the zenith - The light
was so bright at times that objects could be seen at some distance more
 distinctly than during the brightest moonlight - the stars were particularly bright -
The light would pass over the heavens like waves, the outer edges of which were of
 dark blue color & would then run into each other like waves seen in shoal water.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ow3/USS%20Rodgers/Rodgers_1881/b001of010_0182_1.jpg
« Last Edit: April 10, 2013, 03:15:48 pm by Randi »

Randi

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Re: Rodgers -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #179 on: February 08, 2013, 07:35:04 pm »
Lovely!

Would you please give me the page link?