Author Topic: Personal Effects - HMS Fox  (Read 1998 times)

kennymac825

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Personal Effects - HMS Fox
« on: October 26, 2010, 04:54:52 pm »
Thought I would share this from the log of HMS Fox.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ADM_53-42071/ADM%2053-42071-025_1.jpg

An aution was held to dispose of the personal effects of 6 who died on board Pegasus. I can't help but think of the family at home who would have cherished those things from their loved ones. 
 :(

tamoralady

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Re: Personal Effects
« Reply #1 on: October 26, 2010, 04:56:06 pm »
How very sad  :(

badskittler

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Re: Personal Effects
« Reply #2 on: October 26, 2010, 05:41:25 pm »
If their personal effects were sold does anyone know if the relatives get the cash?

Badskittler

HawkerHart

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Re: Personal Effects
« Reply #3 on: October 26, 2010, 05:52:45 pm »
I think it was mentioned on another post. They were sold to raise cash for the relatives.

elizabeth

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Re: Personal Effects
« Reply #4 on: October 27, 2010, 04:42:45 pm »
 :) "Sale of effects - started at least in the 18th century, and finished, I don't know when - during or after World War 2? When someone died or was killed, their personal effects - clothes etc. were auctioned off and the proceeds sent to their next of kin. I believe that if the man was popular, his mates or oppo's (opposite number) would sometime pay ridiculous prices for ordinary items just to make sure, say his widow, received a good sum." Quote from I question I had asked navalhistory

CharlesNorrieTemp

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Re: Personal Effects
« Reply #5 on: October 27, 2010, 05:51:20 pm »
To be honest the RN seems to have been punctilious about people getting money.

For example with prize-money, if we are to believe O'Brian, the crew would share its portion although Admiral, captain and officers took a larger cut, and the agents/owners of the seized ship had the right to challenge the validity of seizure in that quaint, fierce but effective court known as Divorce, probate and Admiralty, successor to the old Admiralty courts.

The sale of effects fell outside this system, but if there were widespread corruption and relatives were deprived, I have to hear about it.

If the masthead auction was fundamentally corrupt, why bother to hold it all.  Why not simply steal his effects?

Haywain

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Re: Personal Effects
« Reply #6 on: October 27, 2010, 07:15:32 pm »
Whilst it may seem impersonal, it would have been much easier to ensure the money got back to the relatives rather than their effects.  A lot more opportunity for things to go missing in transit.  As Gordon has said, there is plenty of evidence that depending on their circumstances, prices became inflated to help reduce immediate hardship.  There was also the thought that one day it might be their belongings being auctioned to help their own dependants.

Regards

Haywain

navalhistory

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Re: Personal Effects
« Reply #7 on: October 28, 2010, 12:44:50 am »
At least by the time of World War 1, prize and salvage money was very carefully administered. I have recently added a page on WW1 ships that received these awards - at http://www.naval-history.net/WW1NavyBritishLGNavalPrizeMoney.htm

LG is for London Gazette. I haven't made a note of the relevant pages but there were very precise rules for who got what. Imagine sorting out the prize money for all the umpteen ships that fought in the Battle of Jutland, but they did, and without computers! It's worth visiting the London Gazette site to search for information like this.

http://www.naval-history.net/WW1NavyBritishLondonGazette1510.htm#29312 includes awards made in the Persian Gulf for capturing gun runners and pirates. My own grandfather received some of this, all carefully recorded in his service record.

Gordon