Author Topic: Patterson -- Reference: Transcription Example and Log Description  (Read 5620 times)

Janet Jaguar

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If you want to look at similar pages for other ships go to: * * * Index - Use this to find your Ship * * *




Welcome on board the
USC&GSS Carlile P. Patterson


This post covers a log page from 1884; the following post covers a log page from 1914.


The ship is usually known as the Coast and Geodetic Survey Steamer Patterson,
with Carlile P. dropped from the ship's name.
In service 1884 -1919. Pacific service.



Patterson leaves Hampton Roads on her maiden voyage via the Straits of Magellan to the West Coast of the US.


Have a look around the forum, and don't hesitate to pose questions! There are lots of people who would be happy to respond. Each time you join a new ship have a look for one of these pages.

Feel free to add your own questions and comments to:
Patterson -- Discussion: Questions and Comments



Comments on the log:
  • This is a fairly standard log format.
  • This log was processed when the scanning technique had not been refined.
    • A few pages have been scanned twice; transcribe the first copy of each and just click on "I've finished with this page" for the second. For more information see: Listing of Faulty Scanned and Duplicate Pages - Phase 3.
    • Because the pages were not laid flat, the lines slant noticeably, requiring a higher than usual magnifier.
  • Note that the date in the log is in US order (month, day, year) and on the Date tab the order is day, month, year following the Royal Navy format.
  • The noon latitude and longitude readings may appear to be decimal. However the 'decimal point' is actually a degree sign. See example under 'Location' in Type What You See - Yes, but ...
  • There are multiple log keepers per page.
  • On the positive side, the log keepers are trained cartographers with beautiful, clear handwriting.
  • Note that on the RN ships we encouraged transcribers to record the names of people, places, and ships mentioned in the log. Now that we are in the Arctic, there are some new items that are of interest. The scientists would appreciate your recording sightings of sea ice on the Sea Ice tab and sightings of animals on the Animals tab, giving them the full sentence or description. The historians would appreciate your recording refueling on the Refueling tab.


Links to helpful transcribing information:


Links to further info about the ship:


A fellow transcriber (wendolk) has created a database to help both transcribers and historians (and contributors are welcome):
Searchable Database






Weather Page:
Example: http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ow3/final/USCS%20Patterson/Book%201/IMG_4772_0.jpg

The written details are transcribed as follows, though the page you are working on will not display a grid in this way. Note that the data in some columns is not transcribed and that some logs do not have all the columns included on the Weather Observation tab, so, before clicking OK, check that your data is in the correct fields. It is more important to be accurate than to be fast. Only transcribe what is written. Ask on the forum for handwriting help if unsure.

Quote
Location | Place Name | Name = Making passage from Hampton, Va. to Funchal, Madeira.


Hour |Wind Dir |Force |Bar Height |Ther Attached |Dry |Wet |Water |Weather Code |Cloud code |Clear Sky |
1SxE330.0376bcl
2"330.0376bl
3"330.0375"
4"330.0375bcl
5"330.0075bc
6SSE330.0075"
7"330.0075"
8"3-430.0276"
9SExE3-430.0277"
10SSE4-530.0078"
11"4-529.99767974"Cir.Str.Cum.5
Noon"4-529.9879807874""5
   
                                 

Location | Observed | Latitude = 37 35 | Longitude = 73 00 42


Hour |Wind Dir |Force |Bar Height |Ther Attached |Dry |Wet |Water |Weather Code |Cloud code |Clear Sky |
1SSE429.9677817974bcCir-Str7
2"429.9577909274""8
3"429.9377808074""8
4"429.9277808075""8
5SxW429.9278848375""6
6"429.9277797875""6
7"429.9277787674""3
8"429.9277777673""2
9SSW4-529.9476777674""2
10"4-529.9478777778""2
11"5-629.9478787674""5
Mid."529.9478787774""4
                                       

Notes for transcribers:
  • There some notations in red ink (Square 780, latitudes and longitudes). According to Kevin R. Wood, one of our project scientists:
    Quote
    There are added mark-ups of this sort in quite a few logs which appear to be done later as part of the process of computing statistics (by hand) for earlier editions of the Pilot Charts or similar derived navigational products.
    There is no need to transcribe them.
  • The 2am pressure is hard to read. It could be 30.00 rather than 30.03. However, given that the next page notes "Barometer steady" and that the 1am and 3am readings are 30.03, I 'extravagantly guessed' 30.03. Don't worry too much; remember that there will be two other people transcribing this same reading.
  • If any of the wind directions or cloud codes are in included in the interface drop-downs, you may choose those instead of what is written. 'North' may be entered 'N', and 'Cu-N' may be entered 'Cum-Nim'.
  • The noon lat/long readings are observed. The log keeper neglected to label them 'N' and 'W', which they are in fact. TWYS, and do not add that information.
  • In general, the symbols for degrees, minutes, and seconds can be omitted. Because the entry boxes will not accept a degree symbol, we have developed the convention of using a lower-case 'o' to represent degrees. In this case, adding the symbols for degrees and minutes seemed to make the meaning clearer. However, this is up to the transcriber to decide.
  • There is no field on the page specifically for refueling. If the amount of coal received is mentioned, the data should go on the Refueling tab. There may be entries for 'Coal consumed' and 'Coal remaining', but there is no need to enter these numbers unless they interest you (in which case they would go on the Events tab).



Record of the Miscellaneous Events of the Day:
Example: http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ow3/final/USCS%20Patterson/Book%201/IMG_4772_1.jpg

This page has been completely transcribed below to help new transcribers become familiar with both the writing and the language used. Nobody is expected to transcribe all the text! Following it are some comments about transcribing the page.

Quote
under the command of Lieut. Richardson Clover, U.S. Navy
Thursday, July 31st, 1884


Commences & until 4. a.m.
     Clear & pleasant. Gentle breeze from S.xE.  Under sail & steam.
Lightening in E.S.E.  Barometer steady.
                                                                               T.G. Dewey, Ensign.

to 8 a.m.
    Clear.  All sail.  Wind S.xE. to S.S.E.  Patent log 139
                                                                               C.C.Marsh,
                                                                                     Ens.

a.m. to noon.
     Clear and pleasant.  Mod. to fresh breeze from S.S.E.  Sea smooth.  At 10.10 stopped
engines to try speed under sail.  Before stopping logged 9.2 & after stopping 5.2
started ahead again at 10.20  At 10.25 clewed down upper topsail & shifted lead
bracer.  At 10.40 set topsail again.  Unbent chains & secured anchor for sea. 
Ship on course E.1/4 N. end of watch.                          CW Ju~on
                                                                                              Ensign

Merid. to 4 P.M.
     Clear & pleasant.  Mod. breeze from S.S.W.  Smooth sea.  Under all sail
and two fires during watch.  Ship on her course E.1/4 N. at end of watch.
                                                                    D.P. Menefee,
                                                                                 Ensign

to 6 P.M.
     Clear & cool.  Moderate breeze from S.xW.  Barometer steady.  Course
1/4 N. & same at end of watch.  Under steam & sail.
                                                                    A.P. Niblack
                                                                                 Ensign

to 8. P.M.
     Clear & pleasant.  Mod. breeze from S.by W.  Ship on course E.1/4 N.
Barometer steady.
                                                                               T.G.Dewey
                                                                                      Ensign
 P.M. to Mid.
     Clear & pleasant.  Partly clear during latter part of watch.  Clouding
up at end of watch.  Wind moderate to stiff from S.S.W. to W.
Occasional flashes of lightning to the Westward. last half hour of watch. 
Barometer steady.  At 8.20 changed course to E.xS. & ship on that
course at end of watch
                                                                                      CWJ~yer~
                                                                                              Ensign.

Notes for transcribers:
  • The date should be transcribed. Date = 31/07/1884
  • With the exception of the date, entering any or all of the information on this page is optional.
  • If you cannot read a letter, a number, or a whole word, please enter a tilde '~' or tildes to indicate this. The signatures of C.W. Jungen are good examples. Do not use '?' or '(?)' unless they appear in the logbook.
  • All the full stops (periods) used in the log entries have been transcribed, but full stops in common abbreviations may be omitted (AM and pm, for exapmple).
  • For more information on the last two points, see Type What You See - Yes, but ...
  • Unfortunately, on most of the events pages in this log book the extreme left side of the page is not visible. For the example transcription above, partial words were completed with a best guess and missing text (e.g., the 4 of "4 to 8 a.m.") was omitted. When you are transcribing: if you can see enough of the word to make a guess, do so; if you cannot guess, prefix the word with a tilde; and if a word is missing altogether, omit it. Bad scans should be reported in Listing of Faulty Scanned Pages - Phase 3. The range from 30 July 1884 to 4 Feb. 1885 has already been reported.



Log keeper's quirks:
    Like the hand writing of good surveyors and map makers, the writing in this log is very neat; the numbers are especially clear and easy to transcribe.


Other information and comments:
  • If you are interested in locations, here are the probable coordinates of some of the places mentioned using Google Maps' decimal coordinates. (Do not enter these, but keeping your own Google map to track the voyage can be fun.)
    • Hampton Roads, VA: 36.9474, -76.3326
    • Funchal, Madeira, Portugal: 32.6426, -16.9131
  • There is a useful list of all the 18th and 19th century US Naval officers. These are what I can find of Patterson's officers on this maiden voyage. The fact that she was never a Navy ship, but a Coast Survey ship, may account for the few not included in the Navy.
    • Clover, Richardson. (Lieutenant in command)
      Acting Midshipman, 30 July, 1863. Graduated 6 June, 1867. Ensign, 18 December, 1868. Master, 21 March, 1870. Lieutenant, 21 March, 1871. Lieutenant Commander, 19 May, 1891. Commander, 16 September, 1897.
    • Thomas S. Streeter(?). Passed Ass't Surgeon 
      Not in Navy list
    • Stevenson, Holland N. Passed Ass't Engineer
      Acting Third Assistant Engineer, under instruction, Naval Academy, 10 October, 1866. Third Assistant Engineer, 2 June, 1868. Second Assistant Engineer, 2 June, 1869. Passed Assistant Engineer, 13 December, 1874. Chief Engineer, 14 December, 1892. Rank changed to Commander, 3 March, 1899.
    • McLean, Walter. Ensign
      Midshipman, 6 June, 1872. Graduated 20 June, 1876. Ensign, 23 October, 1878. Lieutenant, Junior Grade, 1 December, 1885. Lieutenant, 20 May, 1891. Lieutenant Commander, 1 July, 1899.
    • Marsh, Charles C. Ensign
      Cadet Midshipman, 18 September, 1875. Graduated 10 June, 1881. Ensign, Junior Grade, 3 March, 1883. Ensign, 26 June, 1884. Lieutenant, Junior Grade, 14 May, 1891. Lieutenant, 7 June, 1895.
    • Jungen, Carl W. Ensign
      Cadet Midshipman, 24 September, 1874. Graduated 10 June, 1879. Midshipman, 10 June, 1881. Ensign, Junior Grade, 3 March, 1883. Ensign, 26 June, 1884. Lieutenant, Junior Grade, 20 May, 1891. Lieutenant, 1 August, 1895.
    • Niblack, Albert P. Ensign
      Cadet Midshipman, 22 September, 1876. Graduated 22 June, 1882. Ensign, Junior Grade, 3 March, 1883. Ensign, 26 June, 1884. Lieutenant, Junior Grade, 24 August, 1892. Lieutenant, 5 September, 1896.
    • Menefee, Daniel P. Ensign
      Cadet Midshipman, 25 September, 1874. Graduated 10 June, 1881. Ensign, Junior Grade, 3 March, 1883. Ensign, 26 June, 1884. Lieutenant, Junior Grade, 11 December, 1891. Lieutenant, 18 February, 1896.
    • Dewey, Theodore G. Ensign
      Cadet Midshipman, 25 June, 1875. Graduated 22 June, 1882. Ensign, Junior Grade, 3 March, 1883. Ensign, 26 June, 1884. Lieutenant, Junior Grade, 27 September, 1893. Lieutenant, 19 June, 1897.

Have a good voyage!
« Last Edit: October 28, 2014, 11:35:09 am by Hanibal94 »

Randi

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Patterson -- Reference: Transcription Example and Log Description
« Reply #1 on: October 28, 2012, 10:33:50 am »
Welcome on board the
USC&GSS Carlile P. Patterson


This post covers a log page from 1914; the previous post covers a log page from 1884.


The ship is usually known as the Coast and Geodetic Survey Steamer Patterson,
with Carlile P. dropped from the ship's name.
In service 1884 -1919. Pacific service.





Have a look around the forum, and don't hesitate to pose questions! There are lots of people who would be happy to respond. Each time you join a new ship have a look for one of these pages.

Feel free to add your own questions and comments to:
Patterson -- Discussion: Questions and Comments



Comments on the log:
  • It is strongly recommended that only experienced transcribers attempt this log.
  • This is not a standard log format.
    • The order of the columns in the log does not match the order of the columns on the Weather Observation tab.
    • On at least some pages, under the column heading THERMOMETER, Water has been crossed out and Wet has been written in. Therefore, the numbers in this column should be entered in the Wet edit box.
    • On the far left-hand side of the page the heading Temp Sea Water has been added. If there are any entries in this column, they should be entered in the Water edit box.
    • The date should be entered where it appears on the first page (the weather page). For this reason, the 'Progress Bar', just above the image of the log page, will be out of sequence and should be ignored. Note also that the date in the log is in US order (month, day, year) and on the Date tab the order is day, month, year following the Royal Navy format.
  • There are multiple log keepers per page.
  • On the positive side, the log keepers are trained cartographers with beautiful, clear handwriting.
  • Note that on the RN ships we encouraged transcribers to record the names of people, places, and ships mentioned in the log. Now that we are in the Arctic, there are some new items that are of interest. The scientists would appreciate your recording sightings of sea ice on the Sea Ice tab and sightings of animals on the Animals tab, giving them the full sentence or description. The historians would appreciate your recording refueling on the Refueling tab.


Links to helpful transcribing information:


Links to further info about the ship:


A fellow transcriber (wendolk) has created a database to help both transcribers and historians (and contributors are welcome):
Searchable Database






Weather Page:
Example: Left-hand page http://www.cosmik.com/oldweather/patterson_book16_img_6587.jpg

The written details are transcribed as follows, though the page you are working on will not display a grid in this way. Note that the order of the columns in the log does not match the order of the columns on the Weather Observation tab. Note also that the data in some columns is not transcribed and that some logs do not have all the columns included on the Weather Observation tab, so, before clicking OK, check that your data is in the correct fields. It is more important to be accurate than to be fast. Only transcribe what is written. Ask on the forum for handwriting help if unsure.

Quote
Location | Port Name | Name = Porpoise Harbor (Sanborn Harbor), Nagai Isd, Alaska
Date = 14/07/1914


Hour |Wind Dir |Force |Bar Height |Ther Attached |Dry  |Wet  |Water |Weather Code |Cloud Code |Clear Sky |
1 am29.86
2SW1.868499o
3.87
4"2.876288om
5.87
6"2.875688c
7.87
8"2.87578.58.4"
9.87
10SSW1.89589.28.2o
11.89
12"1.90589.48"
1 pm.92
2SW1.926210.010.0d
3SSW1.92628.58.5m
4ESE1.92669.59.5c
5.92
6SE1.92749.810.0o
7.91
8SE1.91699.09.2o
9.91
10Calm0.91669.08.8o
11.91
12SE1.91669.08.0r
                                       


Location | Place Name | Name = anchored Porpoise Harbor (Sanborn Harbor), Nagai Island, Alaska
Events = Coal: 1500# sent to camp

Notes for transcribers:
  • The log keeper sometimes omits the integer portion (e.g., 29.86, .86, .87) from the barometric pressure reading (Bar Height). As shown above, you should not add the 29 when you transcribe the data.
  • If any of the wind directions or cloud codes are in included in the interface drop-downs, you may choose those instead of what is written.  ('North' may be entered 'N', and 'Cu-N' may be entered 'Cum-Nim'.
  • The drawing of an anchor is naval shorthand for "anchor" or "anchored", as is appropriate, and should be typed that way. (A drawing plus "age" is typed "anchorage".) The inclusion of "anchor" in recording the event makes it a phrase, not just a name, and therefore it is entered in Place Name, where all types of place descriptions are accepted.
  • There is no field on the page specifically for refueling. If the amount of coal received is mentioned, the data should go on the Refueling tab. There may be entries for 'Fuel expended during preceding' and 'Fuel remaining on board', but there is no need to enter these numbers unless they interest you (in which case they would go on the Events tab).



Remarks:
Example: Right-hand page http://www.cosmik.com/oldweather/patterson_book16_img_6587.jpg

This page has been completely transcribed below to help new transcribers become familiar with both the writing and the language used. Nobody is expected to transcribe all the text! Following it are some comments about transcribing the page.

Quote
From midnight to 8 a.m.,
    Vessel at anchor in Porpoise Harbor, (Sanborn Harbor), Nagai Island.
    Crew employed breaking out mess stores for the camping parties.
    Steam Launch No.47 came alongside at 7:15.
    Overcast and misty to cloudy.                Calm to light S.W.'ly breezes.
                                                                                   A.L. Giacomini, W.O.

From 8 to noon,
    Hoisted the steam launch, cleaned her bottom and straightened her propeller blades
    and lowered her to the water again.
    Mr. Giacomini and two men left in launch No. 38 for Eagle Harbor at 9:10 to get
    signatures for June payroll and vouchers of Mr. Raynor and party.
    Sent ashore to camp additional provisions and supplies for the entire camping
    party to last until August 15th.
    All members and boats of the camping party had left ship by 11:30, including the
    last cutter-load of supplies.
    Cloudy to overcast.         Light S.W.'ly breezes to light S.S.W.'ly airs.     Smooth at anchorage.
                                                                                                               A.L. Giacomini, W.O.

Mer. to Mid. 
     At 12:05 cutter returned. Hoisted cutter at 12:50 and hove up anchor.  1:15 anchor up and under
way - proceeded towards Eagle Harbor to pick up launch.  1:25 stopped, hoisted launch. 
1:30 Continued on towards Korovin Island, course NWxW through Korovin Strait
At 4:00 rounded Henderson Isd. and headed in for anchorage. While lowering anchor
from the rail, the shank painter fouled J. Connors, seaman, and broke his left leg. The
painter had been taken to the capstan the wrong way, and Olsen, the acting boatswain's
mate, noticed it and capsized two of the three pawls, but when the strain was thrown
suddenly on the painter, the pawls jumped and the barrel of the capstan revolved.
The jerk pulled Connors off his balance and he stepped into the bight of the line. He
was taken below and attended by the Doctor.  Anchored at 4:20 in 9 1/2 fath. (S.&G.) with
45 fath. on stbd anchor north of Henderson Id.
Began current observations at 9:00 P.M.
Weather: Overcast - low hanging clouds.  Lt. SE airs.
                                                                                                                A.M. Sobieralski

Notes for transcribers:
  • Entering any or all of the information on this page is optional, although including the persons and places mentioned below is encouraged.
    • Porpoise Harbor, (Sanborn Harbor), Nagai Island can be entered on the Location tab:
      Location | Port Name | Name = Porpoise Harbor, (Sanborn Harbor), Nagai Island.
    • Mr. Giacomini and Mr. Raynor can be entered on the Mentions tab:
      Mentions | Person | Name = Mr. Giacomini   Context = Mr. Giacomini and two men left in launch No. 38 for Eagle Harbor at 9:10 to get signatures for June payroll and vouchers of Mr. Raynor and party.
      Mentions | Person | Name = Mr. Raynor   Context = Mr. Giacomini and two men left in launch No. 38 for Eagle Harbor at 9:10 to get signatures for June payroll and vouchers of Mr. Raynor and party.
    • J. Conners and Olsen can also be entered on the Mentions tab:
      Mentions | Person | Name = J. Connors, seaman     Context = At 4:00 rounded Henderson Isd. and headed in for anchorage. While lowering anchor from the rail, the shank painter fouled J. Connors, seaman, and broke his left leg. The painter had been taken to the capstan the wrong way, and Olsen, the acting boatswain's mate noticed it and capsized two of the three pawls, but when the strain was thrown suddenly on the painter, the pawls jumped and the barrel of the capstan revolved. The jerk pulled Connors off his balance and he stepped into the bight of the line. He was taken below and attended by the Doctor.
      Mentions | Person | Name = Olsen, the acting boatswain's mate     Context = At 4:00 rounded Henderson Isd. and headed in for anchorage. While lowering anchor from the rail, the shank painter fouled J. Connors, seaman, and broke his left leg. The painter had been taken to the capstan the wrong way, and Olsen, the acting boatswain's mate noticed it and capsized two of the three pawls, but when the strain was thrown suddenly on the painter, the pawls jumped and the barrel of the capstan revolved. The jerk pulled Connors off his balance and he stepped into the bight of the line. He was taken below and attended by the Doctor.
      You do not have to enter the entire description if you don't wish to (e.g., "While lowering anchor from the rail, the shank painter fouled J. Connors, seaman, and broke his left leg." for Connors and no context for Olsen), but please do not change anything. Alternatively, you could enter a briefer description here and enter the entire event on the Events tab.
    • There are several places named in the first part of the afternoon; "towards Eagle Harbor," "towards Korovin Island," "through Korovin Strait" and "rounded Henderson Isd.". These can be entered on the Location tab if you wish to record the ship's course. For example:
      Location | Place Name | Name = towards Eagle Harbor.
    • More importantly, the new anchorage not mentioned on the previous page can be entered on the Location tab:
      Location | Place Name | Name = Anchored at 4:20 ... north of Henderson Id.
  • "S.W.ly breezes" is read "Southwesterly breezes" and should be typed S.W.'ly, S.W.ly, SW'ly, or SWly as you choose.
  • If you cannot read a letter, a number, or a whole word, please enter a tilde (~) or tildes to indicate this. If the first vowel in Connors' name had been a scrawl, it could be entered as "C~nnors".
  • In general, the symbols for degrees, minutes, and seconds can be omitted. Because the entry boxes will not accept a degree symbol, we have developed the convention of using a lower-case 'o' to represent degrees. In this case, adding the symbols for degrees and minutes seemed to make the meaning clearer. However, this is up to the transcriber to decide.
  • All the full stops (periods) used in the log entries have been transcribed, but full stops in common abbreviations may be omitted.
  • For more information on the last four points, see Type What You See - Yes, but ...



Log keeper's quirks:
    Like the hand writing of all good surveyors and map makers, the writing in this log is very neat; the numbers are especially clear and easy to transcribe. This makes up up for the extra care needed to deal with the non-standard format..


Other information and comments:
  • According to http://www.acronymfinder.com/PSC.html, PSC may mean Per Ship's Compass. However, according to Kevin R. Wood, one of the project's scientists, PSC may mean "per standard compass - hence magnetic."
  • If you are interested in locations, here are the probable coordinates of some of the places mentioned (they are all in the state of Alaska) using Google Maps' decimal coordinates.  (Do not enter these, but keeping your own Google map to track the voyage can be fun.)
    • Eagle Harbor: 55.116, -160.115
    • Korovin Island: 55.421, -160.239
    • Korovin Strait: 55.380, -160.329
    • Henderson Island: 55.420, -160.353
  • One of our log keepers, Alfred L. Giacomini, went on to be a Lieutenant Commander: http://www.history.noaa.gov/cgsbios/biog4.html
  • The officer in command of Patterson, James Blaine Miller, rank of Assistant in Survey, was a passenger on the Cunard Steamer LUSITANIA when she was sunk: http://www.history.noaa.gov/cgsbios/biom14.html

Have a good voyage!
« Last Edit: March 04, 2013, 10:21:36 pm by Randi »