Author Topic: Patterson -- Discussion: Questions and Comments  (Read 175499 times)

asterix135

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 634
    • View Profile
Re: Patterson -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #135 on: August 01, 2013, 07:11:45 pm »
I've noticed that on a fairly regular basis on the Patterson, when crew are hired on, they are hired at one rating and then immediately "rated up" to a higher pay grade.

eg: http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ow3/final/USCS%20Patterson/Book%2012/IMG_6106_0.jpg

All four guys who were hired on were "hired" at a 2" class rating, and then immediately given a $5 (per month?) raise and increase in rating to 1" class.

Does anyone know why they would do this rather than just hiring them at the rating they're going to have?


I'm guessing that bribery ploy was very successful anytime the pool of sailors looking for a ship was smaller then the number of openings offered by all the ships in port.  :)

The bribery angle seems less likely in this case:

oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ow3/final/USCS%20Patterson/Book%2013/IMG_6254_1.jpg
oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ow3/final/USCS%20Patterson/Book%2013/IMG_6256_1.jpg

Carl Nilsen was discharged for expiration of term of enlistment, ranked as an A to E 2nd Class on July 1st.  Then on July 2nd, he was re-shipped as A to E 3rd class and immediately rated back up to his old rating.

They're basically renewing this guy's contract for a year while at sea in the middle of nowhere Alaska - yet they need to demote him and then promote him back up to the rank he had the previous day. 

It seems quite pointless to me, and I can't figure out any good explanation for it.

Janet Jaguar

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9655
  • Smell the sea, feel the sky, & fly into the mystic
    • View Profile
Re: Patterson -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #136 on: August 01, 2013, 07:21:08 pm »
That is extremely odd - they are both using him and paying him for a higher grade than he is allowed to keep onshore?  Does he have to take tests or something to keep that grade? 

Kevin

  • Old Weather Team
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 531
    • View Profile
Re: Patterson -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #137 on: August 01, 2013, 07:59:48 pm »
It could be that there is a standard billet list for the ship - in today's merchant marine it is the official manning document that is part of the certificate of inspection. So a ship has to have, say, one master, three mates, 4 ABs and 8 ordinary seamen...  So you hire the only guy you have to fill the OS billet and then promote him to his usual rating and pay. In fact, now that I think about it I sailed on more than one occasion in a billet two levels below grade but was paid my usual rate as chief officer or whatever it was. This was because the person who was supposed to sail as 3rd was not able to make it and I was asked to make a 'pier-head leap' as its called.

asterix135

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 634
    • View Profile
Re: Patterson -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #138 on: August 01, 2013, 08:42:35 pm »
So in this case "rated to A to E 2nd class" means he's officially listed on the books as 3rd class, but being paid as if he was 2nd class?

Randi

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12283
    • View Profile
Re: Patterson -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #139 on: August 01, 2013, 08:48:26 pm »
Thanks, Kevin! That is very interesting.



So in this case "rated to A to E 2nd class" means he's officially listed on the books as 3rd class, but being paid as if he was 2nd class?

Or perhaps once the books have been approved he is upgraded?

Janet Jaguar

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9655
  • Smell the sea, feel the sky, & fly into the mystic
    • View Profile
Re: Patterson -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #140 on: August 01, 2013, 09:21:00 pm »
It could be that there is a standard billet list for the ship - in today's merchant marine it is the official manning document that is part of the certificate of inspection. So a ship has to have, say, one master, three mates, 4 ABs and 8 ordinary seamen...  So you hire the only guy you have to fill the OS billet and then promote him to his usual rating and pay. In fact, now that I think about it I sailed on more than one occasion in a billet two levels below grade but was paid my usual rate as chief officer or whatever it was. This was because the person who was supposed to sail as 3rd was not able to make it and I was asked to make a 'pier-head leap' as its called.

That makes more sense.  The ship gets better help, and willingly pays for it, but has to tell the shore folk they have filled all the basic grades.  Especially in a survey or scientific expedition, the added skills would allow nice flexibility when you send out small parties.

AvastMH

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7127
    • View Profile
Re: Patterson -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #141 on: August 06, 2013, 06:50:35 pm »
I'm way back on the Patterson - still heading up to Valparaiso. We've stopped over at Talcahuana and have met the American Consul, Mr J Van Lugen on 30/11/1884 (gosh - exactly three years ago I was burning down on the Rodgers....how the years go by). Curious to know more of the consul I found this:
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Lt William Maxwell Wood's Voyage on the Juniata
(http://www.rosewindpress.com/images/Wm_Maxwell_Wood_Journal_JUNIATA.pdf)

About the March 14th 1887
'Before leaving we gave an afternoon dance on the ship and had all our friends off to it except our Consul. Mr. Van Lugen and his family, wife and party daughter and the guests from Santiago, Mr & Mrs. Manuola.
They, the Van Lugens did not seem to get on well with the rest of the inhabitants.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Party-pooper..oh well... :-\ :-X

Randi

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12283
    • View Profile
Re: Patterson -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #142 on: August 06, 2013, 07:13:31 pm »
 8)

It seems to me that his job is to get on well with the rest of the inhabitants. ::) ::) ::)

AvastMH

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7127
    • View Profile
Re: Patterson -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #143 on: August 06, 2013, 07:24:05 pm »
By Gum - you're right....we'll have his salary back then ;D ;D ;D

Craig

  • Shipherd
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2980
    • View Profile
Re: Patterson -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #144 on: August 07, 2013, 01:26:20 pm »
disappointing for his "party daughter", I imagine  :D

AvastMH

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7127
    • View Profile
Re: Patterson -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #145 on: August 07, 2013, 05:21:43 pm »
That's an odd one isn't it Craig...a party daughter...the only thing it brings to my mind is the old party telephone line system where folks had to share a line if there were insufficient at the exchange. Perhaps there was a dearth of daughters in town.  ::) ::) :-\ ;)

AvastMH

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7127
    • View Profile
Re: Patterson -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #146 on: August 27, 2013, 10:35:42 am »
Rear Admiral Upshur (Nee Nottingham) visits the Patterson during anchorage in Valparaiso.
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ow3/final/USCS%20Patterson/Book%201/IMG_4919_1.jpg
13/12/1884
He was promoted to Commodore Commander, July 25, 1884. He comanded the Flagship of the Pacific Squadron, 1872-73; commanded the Flagship of the Atlantic Squadron, 1875-76; commanded the New York Navy Yard, 1882-84; he was promoted to Rear Admiral and ordered to command U.S. Naval Forces in the Pacific. He retired in May 1885, after 44 years os service, at his own application and resided in Washington, D.C. thereafter.
http://www.arlingtoncemetery.net/jhupshur.htm
« Last Edit: August 27, 2013, 10:41:06 am by AvastMH »

asterix135

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 634
    • View Profile
Re: Patterson -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #147 on: August 28, 2013, 04:39:24 pm »
September 16, 1913 The Patterson passed through several streaks of small pumice stone (old).

Never seen this before.  Doesn't seem like there was significant volcanic activity that year in Alaska.

asterix135

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 634
    • View Profile
Re: Patterson -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #148 on: August 28, 2013, 06:57:55 pm »
SPOILER ALERT!!!

For any other Patterson transcribers, I thought it might be interesting to know what the log books are because they aren't always in order.  I'll update this post as I get farther along:

Since asterix135 is no longer active, I have taken over this list.
It has been updated to include all the logs - having gone as far as I could on this ship, I can confirm the list is complete.

- Hanibal94


Log Books of the Patterson

1. July 30, 1884 - February 4, 1885
Sailing from Virginia (as a shiny new ship) to San Diego, California

2. January 1, 1911 - March 31, 1911
Spent entirely in port/dry dock in or near San Francisco, California

3. July 1, 1911 - September 30, 1911
Working around Unalaska, Alaska

4. April 1, 1911 - June 30, 1911
From San Francisco California to area around Unalaska, Alaska

6. September 1, 1911 - December 15, 1911
From Unalaska, Alaska Area to San Francisco, California

7. April 1, 1912 - June 30, 1912
From Panama to Seattle, Washington

8. July 1, 1912 - September 30, 1912
From Seattle to area around Ketchikan, Alaska

9. December 15, 1911 - March 31, 1912
From San Francisco, California to Panama

10. October 1, 1912 - December 31, 1912
From area around Ketchikan, Alaska to Seattle, Washington and Departing for Maui, Hawaii

11. January 1, 1913 - March 31, 1913
Starting with passage to Maui, Hawaii, ending in Seattle, Washington

12. April 1, 1913 - June 30, 1913
From Seattle Washington to Davidson Bank, Alaska

13. July 1, 1913 - September 30, 1913
Working in and around Davidson Bank, Alaska

14. October 1, 1913 - December 31, 1913
Working in and around Davidson Bank, Alaska then directly to Honolulu & Maui, Hawaii

15. April 1, 1914 - June 30, 1914
Starting in Hawaii and then off to Alaska

16. July 1, 1914 - September 30, 1914
Working in the Alaskan peninsula

17. October 1, 1914 - December 31, 1914
Starting in the area around Unalaska Alaska and then heading to Seattle, Washington

18. January 1, 1915 - March 31, 1915
Sitting. In. Seattle. The. Entire. Three. Months

19. October 1, 1915 - December 31, 1915
Alaska to Seattle

20. July 1, 1915 - September 30, 1915
Working in Alaska

21. April 1, 1915 - June 30, 1915
Generally in & around Seattle, but at the end up to Alaska

22. January 1, 1916 - March 31, 1916
In port in Seattle

23. April 1, 1916 - June 30, 1916
From Seattle to area north of Ketchikan Alaska

24. July 1, 1916 - September 30, 1916
Working in the area near Ketchikan and Wrangell Alaska

25. October 1, 1916 - December 31, 1916
Working in the area near Ketchikan and Wrangell Alaska and then back to Seattle

26. January 1, 1917 - March 31, 1917
Seattle and Winslow, Washington

27. April 1, 1917 - June 30, 1917
Seattle to Alaska

28. July 1, 1917 - September 30, 1917
Near Juneau Alaska

29. October 1, 1917 - December 31, 1917
From Juneau Alaska to Seattle Washington

30. January 1, 1918 - March 31, 1918
(does not come up for transcription here - see below)

31. April 1, 1918 - May 23, 1918
In port in Seattle until transferred to the US Navy on May 23

32.
Not available

33. February 6, 1885 - July 20, 1885
From San Diego to Naha Bay, Alaska

34. July 21, 1885 - January 16, 1886
From Kasaan Bay, Alaska to Mare Island, California

35. January 17th, 1886 - July 7th, 1886
From Mare Island, California to Steamer Bay, Alaska

36. July 8th, 1886 - December 31st, 1886
From Steamer Bay, Alaska to Mare Island, California

37. January 1st, 1887 - June 27th, 1887
From Mare Island, California to around Chican, Alaska

38. June 28th, 1887 - December 30th, 1887
From Portage Bay, Alaska to Mare Island, California

39. December 31st, 1887 - June 26th, 1888
From Mare Island, California to area near Juneau, Alaska

40. June 27th, 1888 - January 1st, 1889
From Juneau, Alaska to Oakland, California

41. January 2nd, 1889 - July 4th, 1889
From Oakland, California to Southeast Alaska

42. July 5th, 1889 - October 9th, 1889
Mostly working in Alaska, departing for California towards the end

43. October 10th, 1889 - January 12th, 1890
From Alaska to Mare Island, California

44. January 13th, 1890 - July 22nd, 1890
From Mare Island, California to Southeast Alaska

45. October 28th, 1890 - December 31st, 1890
Sitting around in San Francisco and Mare Island, California

46. July 23rd, 1890 - October 27th, 1890
From Portage Bay, Southeast Alaska to San Francisco

47. January 1st, 1891 - April 5th, 1891
Sitting around in Mare Island the whole time

48. April 6th, 1891 - June 30th, 1891
From Mare Island, California to Shoalwater Pass,  Alaska

49. July 1st, 1891 - Sep 30th, 1891
From Shoalwater Pass, Alaska to Departure Bay, British Columbia

50. January 1st, 1892 - March 31st, 1892
In Mare Island, California all the time (Does not appear to come up for transcription)

51. Oct 1st, 1891 - Dec 31st, 1891
From Departure Bay, British Columbia to Mare Island, California

52. April 1st, 1892 - June 30th, 1892
From Mare Island, California to Conclusion Harbor

53. July 1st, 1892 - Sep 30th, 1892
From Conclusion Harbor to Departure Bay, British Columbia

54. Oct 1st, 1892 - Dec 31st, 1892
From Departure Bay, British Columbia to San Francisco, California

55. January 1st, 1893 - March 31st, 1893
In San Francisco for all three months

56. April 1st, 1893 - June 30th, 1893
From Mare Island, California to Unknown due to inability to access final pages of log (Does not come up for transcription)

72. January 1, 1918 - March 31, 1918
In port in Seattle (Only Jan 1st - Jan 18th actually come up for transcription)

75. April 1st, 1897 - June 30th, 1897
From San Francisco to Gilmer Bay, Sitka, Alaska

76. July 1st, 1897 - September 30th, 1897
DUPLICATE of 78

77. October 1st, 1897 - December 31st, 1897
DUPLICATE of 79 (does not come up for transcription)

78. July 1st, 1897 - September 30th, 1897

79. October 1st, 1897 - December 31st, 1897

80. January 1st - March 31st 1898

81. April 1st - June 30th 1898

82. April 1st - September 30th 1899

83. October 31st - December 31st 1898

84. July 1st - September 30th 1898

85. January 1st - March 31st 1899

86. October 1st - December 31st 1899
DUPLICATE OF 88 (does not come up for transcription)

87. April 1st - June 30th 1900

88. October 1st - December 31st 1899

89. July 1st 1900 - September 30th 1900
(does not come up for transcription although it should)

94. January 1st 1893 - March 31st 1893
DUPLICATE OF 55

96. July 1st 1893 - September 30th 1893

97. October 1st 1893 - December 31st 1893

98. January 1st 1894 - March 31st 1894

99. April 1st 1894 - June 30th 1894

100. July 1st 1894 - September 30th 1894

101. October 1st 1894 - December 31st 1894

102. January 1st 1895 - March 31st 1895

103. April 1st 1895 - June 30th 1895

104. July 1st 1895 - September 30th 1895

105. October 1st 1895 - December 31st 1895

107. January 1st 1896 - March 31st 1896

108. April 1st 1896 - June 30th 1896

109. July 1st 1896 - September 30th 1896

110. October 1st 1896 - December 31st 1896

112. April 1st - 22nd 1897 and April 1st  - June 30th 1900
DUPLICATE OF PART OF 75 AND ALL OF 87

113. January 1st 1900 - March 31st 1900
Also contains 26th Feb - 31 Mar 1892, which must be transcribed as well.

114. April 1st 1901 - June 30th 1901

115. October 1st 1900 - December 31st 1900

116. July 1st 1901 - September 30th 1901

117. October 1st 1901 - December 31st 1901

118. May 26th 1902 - June 30th 1902

119. July 1st 1902 - September 30th 1902

120. October 1st 1902 - December 31st 1902

121. January 1st - 24th 1903

122. April 1st 1903 - June 30th 1903

123. July 1st 1903 - September 30th 1903

124. October 1st 1903 - December 31st 1903

125. January 1st 1904 - March 31st 1904

126. April 1st 1904 - June 30th 1904

127. July 1st 1904 - September 30th 1904

128. October 1st 1904 - December 31st 1904

129. January 1st 1905 - March 31st 1905

130. April 1st 1905 - June 30th 1905
« Last Edit: June 11, 2016, 01:38:42 pm by Hanibal94 »

asterix135

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 634
    • View Profile
Re: Patterson -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #149 on: August 29, 2013, 04:54:02 pm »
How would you record the 8:00 am entry on this? http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ow3/final/USCS%20Patterson/Book%2013/IMG_6337_0.jpg

There are two time entries in the box - 8:00 and 8:30, with the 8:30 above the 8:00

I'm counting one entry for 8:30 with wind from the SW at a speed of 1 - nothing else

The second entry is all the wind direction of ", speed of 1 and all the other info on the line

Seem right?