Poll

How difficult to transcribe are the currently available log pages of the Yorktown, relative to other ships?

1-STAR:  Easy log ‒ excellent for new transcribers
0 (0%)
2-STARS:  Intermediate log ‒ good for all transcribers
1 (100%)
3-STARS:  Challenging log ‒ suitable for experienced transcribers or new transcribers willing to take on a challenge
0 (0%)
4-STARS:  Very challenging log ‒ suitable only for experienced transcribers because of highly variable formats
0 (0%)
Sometimes one level, sometimes very much another; please explain this in a reply to this topic
0 (0%)

Total Members Voted: 1

Author Topic: Yorktown -- Discussion: Questions and Comments  (Read 68646 times)

Randi

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12822
    • View Profile
Re: Yorktown -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #15 on: March 23, 2013, 11:01:35 am »
Just a WILD guess.
Hydrographic Office
Perhaps they released a bottle containing the lat and long specified to track the current. If someone finds the bottle they can say where it was found.

http://www.theamericansurveyor.com/PDF/TheAmericanSurveyor_Penry-MessageInABottle_March2007.pdf
« Last Edit: March 23, 2013, 11:03:14 am by Randi »

Maikel

  • Editor
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2531
    • View Profile
Re: Yorktown -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #16 on: March 23, 2013, 03:51:07 pm »
Perhaps the sentence reads:
At 3.30 threw overboard a bottle containing HO oceans current report. Lat. 30 50N. Long. 58 22W.

About the punctuation, I can tell you the log-keeper isn't shy in throwing .,-:;'s around in places you normally would not expect them.

Janet Jaguar

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10205
  • Smell the sea, feel the sky, & fly into the mystic
    • View Profile
Re: Yorktown -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #17 on: March 23, 2013, 06:46:20 pm »
Just a WILD guess.
Hydrographic Office
Perhaps they released a bottle containing the lat and long specified to track the current. If someone finds the bottle they can say where it was found.

http://www.theamericansurveyor.com/PDF/TheAmericanSurveyor_Penry-MessageInABottle_March2007.pdf

Using drifters is still the official way to track ocean currents, only now USGS puts GPS transmitters on them.  It's good to know this was being done fairly early in our history. 

P.S. we can all become Drifter Trackers   ;)
http://www.drifters.doe.gov/track-a-yoto/track-a-drifter.html

Maikel

  • Editor
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2531
    • View Profile

Kevin

  • Old Weather Team
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 548
    • View Profile
Re: Yorktown -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #19 on: March 27, 2013, 02:09:16 pm »
Map of drifter array now: http://www.argo.ucsd.edu/About_Argo.html. And by the way, the same technique was used in the Arctic way back using reinforced barrels. Those launched from Barrow region were picked up later in Greenland (where Jeannette debris was also found).

Randi

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12822
    • View Profile
Re: Yorktown -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #20 on: April 10, 2013, 03:53:38 pm »
Keep an eye out for Patterson ;D

May 7, 1912

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ow3/final/USCS%20Patterson/Book%207/IMG_5585_1.jpg

2:45 The Com'd'g Officer left ship in the launch for the USS Yorktown.

Doesn't look like the Yorktown is up to logs from 1912 yet so who knows if they'll note the event or not

Kevin

  • Old Weather Team
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 548
    • View Profile
Re: Yorktown -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #21 on: April 10, 2013, 07:33:41 pm »

Janet Jaguar

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10205
  • Smell the sea, feel the sky, & fly into the mystic
    • View Profile
Re: Yorktown -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #22 on: April 10, 2013, 07:51:41 pm »
Hummm...about those JEANNETTE relics?
http://ku-prism.org/polarscientist/Jeannette/feb181896NY.html

It looks like those drifter fragments took 12 years to cross Canada.

Randi

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12822
    • View Profile
Re: Yorktown -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #23 on: April 10, 2013, 07:55:51 pm »
" The floe drifted off and the officers did not find the relics, which fell into the hands of the Esquimaux the following year and thence into the hands of the Danish government."

Not sure - maybe it was 12 years till the hoax was publicized?
« Last Edit: April 10, 2013, 07:57:33 pm by Randi »

Maikel

  • Editor
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2531
    • View Profile
Re: Yorktown -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #24 on: April 12, 2013, 07:00:42 pm »
23-08-1890

8 a.m. to meridian:
At meridian half masted colors with flagship in honor of obsequies of the late John Ericceson.

From noon to 4 p.m.:
U.S.S. Baltimore flying despatch flag + carrying the body of the late John Erriccson passed down the Bay + went to sea. on passing was saluted with 21 guns. Swedish flag at fore guard of blue Jackets parading.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ow3/final/USS%20Yorktown/vol004of040_cr2_to_jpg/vol004of040_070_1.jpg

The spelling of the log-keeper isn't always correct (e.g. he manages to spell breeses and breezes on the same page).

Described here is most probably the repatriation ceremony of John Ericsson (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Ericsson)

Edit: Corrected date from 21 to 23-08-1890
« Last Edit: April 13, 2013, 08:46:21 am by Maikel »

Janet Jaguar

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10205
  • Smell the sea, feel the sky, & fly into the mystic
    • View Profile
Re: Yorktown -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #25 on: April 12, 2013, 08:52:17 pm »
That is the right month for that repatriation, according to the Naval History and Heritage Command.

Quote
http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/pers-us/uspers-e/j-ericsn.htm
John Ericsson, one of the 19th Century's most creative engineers and inventors, ...
He remained active until his death in New York City on 8 March 1889. In August 1890, following a memorial service at New York, his body was placed on board the cruiser Baltimore, which carried him across the Atlantic to his native Sweden for burial.

Maikel

  • Editor
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2531
    • View Profile
Re: Yorktown -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #26 on: April 13, 2013, 08:23:51 am »
It's also mentioned on Yorktown's Wikipedia page, including a painting of the White Squadron saluting the Baltimore.

Maikel

  • Editor
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2531
    • View Profile
Re: Yorktown -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #27 on: April 19, 2013, 07:43:25 pm »
13-09-1890 - 4 to 8 p.m.

J.H. Cummings (C.H.) fell overboard from the t. gallant for'castle. Lowered whale boat, let go life-buoy + turned star. search light. Succeeded in rescuing man some distance astern. On being brought on board he was found to be under the influence of liquor.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ow3/final/USS%20Yorktown/vol004of040_cr2_to_jpg/vol004of040_095_1.jpg

Bit embarrassing to have to rescue a drunken man, as earlier that day the Assistant Secretary of the Navy came on board.

AvastMH

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7048
    • View Profile
Re: Yorktown -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #28 on: April 19, 2013, 11:37:31 pm »
oh my! - that's a fair old drop into the ocean. Perhaps that's how he survived it?! :o

Maikel

  • Editor
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2531
    • View Profile
Re: Yorktown -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #29 on: April 20, 2013, 09:48:53 am »
Well, he didn't fell in the Ocean, but in the North River, New York, where the Yorktown was anchored.
Still very cold, I would imagine.

The good news, for him at least, is the he was restored to duty the next day. :)