Author Topic: Another day in the ship's galley ...  (Read 16167 times)

Randi

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Re: Another day in the ship's galley ...
« Reply #30 on: June 06, 2013, 07:55:49 am »
Yes, thanks that is it!

I remember reading Upton Sinclair's book The Jungle a long time ago - and I still remember some of the details quite clearly.

Kevin

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Re: Another day in the ship's galley ...
« Reply #31 on: June 09, 2013, 02:59:32 am »
I think it is a general rule that disease (including food-borne) always took a surprisingly heavy toll compared to actual combat up until fairly recently.

Randi

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Re: Another day in the ship's galley ...
« Reply #32 on: June 09, 2013, 09:08:04 am »
Jamestown - http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ow3/final/USS%20Jamestown/vol001of067/vol001of067_050_0.jpg

Yesterday: "Opened a Barrel of Beef and found it deficient 15 lbs."

Today: "In serving out a barrel of provisions, a barrel of Pork was found deficient 35 lbs."

You will get tired of reporting this sort of thing, Randi. They have a couple of bad barrels every week. You have to wonder about the quality of the ones they don't throw overboard.

I just had a comment saying "discovered a Barrel of Pork to be 9 lbs deficient"

It sounds more like they are reporting that the barrel wasn't as full/heavy as it should have been rather than saying that it was bad (though it probably wasn't good ::)).

Caro

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Re: Another day in the ship's galley ...
« Reply #33 on: June 09, 2013, 09:22:03 am »
I remember that the rum barrels were often reported to be not as full as they should have been on HMS Patuca.
 :)

Helen J

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Re: Another day in the ship's galley ...
« Reply #34 on: June 09, 2013, 12:16:06 pm »
I remember that the rum barrels were often reported to be not as full as they should have been on HMS Patuca.
 :)

Yes, I remember that too.  It always rather amused me that they faithfully noted it down, but never seemed to do anything about it - or at least there were no records of anyone being hauled over the coals for helping themselves!

Randi

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Re: Another day in the ship's galley ...
« Reply #35 on: August 25, 2013, 08:36:46 am »
...
Also from New Scientist 27/07/2013. The Last Word.
"By the way, US Navy cooks traditionally cracked a raw egg into brewing coffee to clarify the Joe."[/color]


Be polite in your laughter - my grandmother did the same thing when she was making a very large urn of coffee for a big to-do and wanted it to taste very good. :)

Kevin

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Re: Another day in the ship's galley ...
« Reply #36 on: September 21, 2013, 09:13:30 pm »
About missing rum:
TO BLEED (SUCK) THE MONKEY
To extract rum from a barrel by boring a small hole in the barrel or cask.
From: http://www.hmsrichmond.org/dict_b.htm

Randi

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Re: Another day in the ship's galley ...
« Reply #37 on: November 11, 2013, 09:23:28 am »
5 Oct 1845:
Received from the Store Ship 17 Bbls of Bread 3 Bbls of Butter and 4 Boxes of Cocoa.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ow3/final/USS%20Jamestown/vol001of067/vol001of067_156_1.jpg

Randi

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Re: Another day in the ship's galley ...
« Reply #38 on: February 02, 2014, 08:26:45 pm »
Generally, however, the Sailor of bygone days was content to sink his chops into a meal that was called "lobscouse," "daddyfunk," or "plumduff." Then for an after dinner demitasse he would wash it down with "pale ale." As an added attraction, if the menu did not suit his culinary taste he could try some "schooner on the rocks." The term "lobscouse" came into being as a byword for what we now call hash. It was a concoction of meat, vegetables and hardtack, and was usually stewed. "Daddyfunk" was a messy concoction of hardtack soaked in water and bake with grease and molasses. "Plumduff" was originally a plain flour pudding containing raisins or currants, boiled in a bag or cloth. "Schooner on the rocks" was the nautical name for to a roast beef surrounded by potatoes, and "pale ale" is known to us today as water.
...
There was no refrigeration aboard ship in olden days. Foodstuffs were apt to spoil easily, and as a result the cook's tasks were made even harder. Fresh meat was carried only in small quantities and fresh vegetables were almost unheard of. When ships were in foreign ports hunting parties were organized to seek fresh meat. In larger ships and on short passages, live beasts were carried for fresh meat, but on long voyages oxen, like men, could get scurvy too, or at any rate thin down to uselessness, and sheep took poorly to the sea life. In good weather hens prospered and about the only animal to prosper at sea was the goat, and the goats prospered always.


Jack-of-the-Dust.  Jack o' the Dust. Person in charge of breaking out provisions for the food service operation.  Originates with the British Navy.  "Jack," a Royal Navy sailor, who worked in the bakery and was covered with flour dust.  Also, "Dusty."
« Last Edit: August 14, 2015, 07:21:23 pm by Randi »

camiller

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Re: Another day in the ship's galley ...
« Reply #39 on: February 02, 2014, 11:08:14 pm »
 8)  The Jamestown 1844 gets "fresh vegetables for the crew" when in port.  Those sailors must have been the lucky ones!

Randi

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Re: Another day in the ship's galley ...
« Reply #40 on: February 04, 2015, 06:38:13 pm »
Lots of lists of supplies received on Vicksburg starting with:
what's for dinner?

Nagasaki Japan Apr 11, 1903: fresh meat, bread, potatoes, eggs
Nagasaki Japan Apr 13, 1903: veal, bread, potatoes
Nagasaki Japan Apr 14, 1903: potatoes, sausage, liver, eggs
Nagasaki Japan Apr 15, 1903: highland cream, beef, potatoes, carrots, turnips, eggs, beef
Nagasaki Japan Apr 16, 1903: bread
Nagasaki Japan Apr 17, 1903: beef, minced meat, bread, eggs, pork chops, beef, potatoes
Nagasaki Japan Apr 18, 1903: beef, potatoes, onions, carrot sticks, eggs, corned beef, tomatoes, pea beans, prunes, dried apples, salt pork, salt beef, swiss milk, sugar, hops, rice,
Nagasaki Japan Apr 19, 1903: bread, ?, liver
Nagasaki Japan Apr 21, 1903: beef, potatoes, salt

AvastMH

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Re: Another day in the ship's galley ...
« Reply #41 on: February 04, 2015, 09:17:00 pm »
So - April the 16th was party day then?! ('bread'...let's hope it was multigrain  :P)

Tegwen

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Re: Another day in the ship's galley ...
« Reply #42 on: February 05, 2015, 05:09:38 pm »
Lots of lists of supplies received on Vicksburg starting with:
what's for dinner?

Nagasaki Japan Apr 11, 1903: fresh meat, bread, potatoes, eggs
Nagasaki Japan Apr 13, 1903: veal, bread, potatoes
Nagasaki Japan Apr 14, 1903: potatoes, sausage, liver, eggs
Nagasaki Japan Apr 15, 1903: highland cream, beef, potatoes, carrots, turnips, eggs, beef
Nagasaki Japan Apr 16, 1903: bread
Nagasaki Japan Apr 17, 1903: beef, minced meat, bread, eggs, pork chops, beef, potatoes
Nagasaki Japan Apr 18, 1903: beef, potatoes, onions, carrot sticks, eggs, corned beef, tomatoes, pea beans, prunes, dried apples, salt pork, salt beef, swiss milk, sugar, hops, rice,
Nagasaki Japan Apr 19, 1903: bread, ?, liver
Nagasaki Japan Apr 21, 1903: beef, potatoes, salt

That entry for the 18th of April is very weird. Swiss milk, hops & rice. Not sure what Swiss milk is but hops are not edible, in any form that I can think of. They are the dried flowers of a plant. They have a wonderful aroma, but would not taste of that. I guess they could be used as a herb, but have never heard of that. They do not even taste bitter unless boiled in acidic solution, whereupon the bitterness extracts into the liquid.

Randi

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Re: Another day in the ship's galley ...
« Reply #43 on: February 05, 2015, 06:04:19 pm »
Beverages
The only major commercial use for hops is in beer, although hops are also an ingredient in Julmust, a carbonated beverage similar to soda that is popular in Sweden during December, as well as Malta, a Latin American soft drink. Hops are sometimes added to some varieties of kvass. They are also used for flavor in some tisanes.

Medicinal
Hops are also used in herbal medicine in a way similar to valerian, as a treatment for anxiety, restlessness, and insomnia.[34] A pillow filled with hops is a popular folk remedy for sleeplessness, and animal research has shown a sedative effect.[35] The relaxing effect of hops may be due, in part, to the specific chemical component dimethylvinyl carbinol.[36][37] Hops tend to be unstable when exposed to light or air and lose their potency after a few months' storage.

Caro

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Re: Another day in the ship's galley ...
« Reply #44 on: February 05, 2015, 07:44:40 pm »
Tablet is sometimes referred to as Swiss Milk tablet (Swiss Milk being a term used by some for condensed milk) or butter tablet.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tablet_%28confectionery%29