Poll

How difficult to transcribe are the currently available log pages of the Jamestown (1844), relative to other ships?

1-STAR:  Easy log ‒ excellent for new transcribers
0 (0%)
2-STARS:  Intermediate log ‒ good for all transcribers
0 (0%)
3-STARS:  Challenging log ‒ suitable for experienced transcribers or new transcribers willing to take on a challenge
0 (0%)
4-STARS:  Very challenging log ‒ suitable only for experienced transcribers because of highly variable formats
4 (100%)
Sometimes one level, sometimes very much another; please explain this in a reply to this topic
0 (0%)

Total Members Voted: 4

Author Topic: Jamestown (1844) -- Discussion: Questions and Comments  (Read 114273 times)

Randi

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Re: Jamestown (1844) -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #15 on: March 26, 2013, 10:13:05 pm »
Usually there is only one date per pair of pages.
Just transcribe the date on the page where is appears.

I hope you are enjoying transcribing. Don't hesitate to ask questions!

Janet Jaguar

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Re: Jamestown (1844) -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #16 on: March 26, 2013, 10:19:54 pm »
Nope, you are seeing true.  To understand, picture the weather and comment pages both showing in an open book.  The whole 2 page spread is that day's log, and when handling the paper book that would be obvious.

Our scanners took a single picture of that open book, and the computer then cut the picture in half so we see one page at a time.  The jpg links to the scans are joined at the hip as far as our computers are concerned - any dates and locations recorded on page xxxabc_0.jpg (weather) will automatically be applied to page xxxabc_1.jpg (comments) and vice versa.

Type what you see and know it will all come out okay.  :)

-------------------------------------
added:  Hi, Randi.  :)

Randi

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Re: Jamestown (1844) -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #17 on: March 29, 2013, 07:59:41 am »
For some slightly more detailed instructions, see How to look at log pages before and after the one you are working on
« Last Edit: March 29, 2013, 02:24:51 pm by Randi »

Clewi

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Re: Jamestown (1844) -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #18 on: April 10, 2013, 09:57:29 pm »
On the 44 log, I assume the "F" column is wind force?! What scale is it? Was Beaufort used here?

Kevin

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Re: Jamestown (1844) -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #19 on: April 10, 2013, 10:04:25 pm »
If it is K then F it is Knots and Fathoms measured by an old fashioned 'chip' log - basically a little sea anchor attached to a line with knots in it that spools out proportionally to the ship's rate of advance when the chip is cast into the sea. Used for navigation.

Randi

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Re: Jamestown (1844) -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #20 on: April 10, 2013, 10:46:23 pm »

Clewi

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Re: Jamestown (1844) -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #21 on: April 10, 2013, 11:02:05 pm »
I see! I had fathoms mentally wired with depth under keel or so and thought "Naaaa....can't be!" Hence the confusion on my part. So, does it help if I add the weather description to the events tab in addition to the usual table? I did this anyway on the first few pages in order to acquaint myself with the handwriting and characteristic style.

Randi

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Re: Jamestown (1844) -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #22 on: April 10, 2013, 11:08:35 pm »
Philip does not currently use weather information in text form.
He, or others, might use it at some future time.
The rule is still 'what interests you'. All the information will be saved.

Clewi

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Re: Jamestown (1844) -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #23 on: April 10, 2013, 11:19:43 pm »
Okay, they're mostly one line only, so no big deal.

JamesAPrattIII

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Re: Jamestown (1844) -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #24 on: April 16, 2013, 01:44:22 am »
It looks like Clewi blew past me as Captain of the Jamestown. This ship is about to start its commission on anti-slave trade patrol off the coast of africa. For those of you who expect alot action there wasn't much. The USN captured 58 slave ships from 1820 to about the 1870s(?) and only 2 or 3 during the period 1841-1859. See the books the "Royal navy and the Slave traders" Bernard Edwards and "The Slave Trade" Hugh Thomas. Also note: alot of sailors did die of disease mostly during these operations. Also note my first 160 or so posts may not have been all that accurate.

Janet Jaguar

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Re: Jamestown (1844) -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #25 on: April 16, 2013, 01:48:33 am »
James, you can't have been that much more wrong than anyone else here.  Give yourself some wiggle room. ;)

JamesAPrattIII

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Re: Jamestown (1844) -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #26 on: April 23, 2013, 11:41:24 pm »
In looking through another book on the history of the USN I have some errata: The USN captured 5 slavers in 1820,10 during the 1845-1850 period and 25 during the period 1859-1861. I will probably make more changes when i have more information.

Randi

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Re: Jamestown (1844) -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #27 on: April 28, 2013, 11:20:24 am »
Note that for Jamestown 1866 (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ow3/final/USS%20Jamestown/vol019of067/vol019of067_057_0.jpg) the fathoms in the heading (next to knots) are one eighth of a knot and not the modern 6 feet!


I have done the reverse computation to evaluate the ratio between knot and fathom.
Here are my results for logs around USS Jamestown - vol019of067_08x:
1- 60 knots and 31 fathoms vs 64 knots => 0.129,
2- 150 knots and 88 fathoms vs 160 knots => 0.114,
3- 134 knots and 24 fathoms vs 139 knots => 0.208,
4- 147 knots and 62 fathoms vs 155 knots => 0.129,
Conclusion: the ratio seems to be arround 1/8.
Note: This ratio is confirmed by the more often value of fathom column (0 and 4) for (0.0 and 0.5 knot).



http://books.google.fr/books?id=pnEDAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA28&dq=fathom+knot+tenth&hl=en&sa=X&ei=n5KiULbgE6ea1AWUiIGIDA&ved=0CDAQ6AEwAQ#v=onepage&q&f=false
says
"Sometimes (...) the knot is divided into ten parts; more frequently perhaps into eight.

On Corwin (http://www.cosmik.com/oldweather/corwin_example_1001-1.jpg), at least on the pages I looked at, a fathom was a tenth of a knot. Some later logbooks changed the heading to knots and tenths (http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ow3/USS%20Bear/Bear_1894/pics2%20018_0.jpg). I was as startled at Corwin's log as jpiquard was here, so I did quite a bit of digging ;D

JamesAPrattIII

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Re: Jamestown (1844) -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #28 on: May 12, 2013, 12:09:57 am »
I got the book Africa Squadron the US Navy and the Slave Trade 1842-1861' Don L Canney. Which deals with the USNs anti-slave trade operations during this period . It has accounts of the Jamestowns 1845-46 and 1855-57 cruises. On the first cruise the Jamestown captured 2 slavers. one was the Merchant detained by the sloop HMS Cygnet off Sierra Leonne and releases her to the Jamestown on 12 March 1845. The US courts released the ship and its master. The second was the Robert Wilson drivn into the US base at Porto Prayo in the Cape Verde islands do to bad weather the Jamestown was there at the time searched the ship and found her equipped for a slave voyage seized her with portugese approval. This time the Federal courts in the US confiscated the ship and gave the master William Von Pfister 3 years in prison and a $1000 fine in April 1847 he received a full pardon.  One hopes this is of some interest.

Janet Jaguar

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Re: Jamestown (1844) -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #29 on: May 12, 2013, 01:02:47 pm »
Really amazing and saddening to see how the courts failed to support the anti-slavery efforts across the board.  It explains a kind of build up to the Dred Scott decision by the Supreme Court in 1857.