Author Topic: Sail and Wind Powered Sailing Terms  (Read 13092 times)

Kevin

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Re: Sail and Wind Powered Sailing Terms
« Reply #15 on: April 15, 2013, 02:25:28 am »
As we go back in time Lever's 'Young Sea Officer's Sheet Anchor' may come in handy:

http://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/008600484

Where to turn when asked to box-haul the catharpins.

Janet Jaguar

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Re: Sail and Wind Powered Sailing Terms
« Reply #16 on: April 15, 2013, 04:00:57 am »
This one is definitely different than others we have looked at - I added it to helpful links.

Randi

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Re: Sail and Wind Powered Sailing Terms
« Reply #17 on: April 15, 2013, 07:45:45 am »
As we go back in time Lever's 'Young Sea Officer's Sheet Anchor' may come in handy:

http://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/008600484

Where to turn when asked to box-haul the catharpins.

Very helpful!

Randi

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Re: Sail and Wind Powered Sailing Terms
« Reply #18 on: May 25, 2013, 11:10:59 pm »
House (Naut.) To stow in a safe place; to take down and make safe; as, to house the upper spars. - http://www.webster-dictionary.net/definition/housed

"Squaring a yard" adjusts the position of the square sails so that they are perpendicular to the keel of the ship. This is done in order to "run before the wind', i.e., sail with the wind directly behind the vessel rather than tacking. - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Square_%28sailing%29

steering-sail Same as studdingsail. - http://www.wordnik.com/words/steering-sail

studdingsail - http://www.wordnik.com/words/studdingsail
« Last Edit: June 02, 2013, 09:21:17 am by Randi »

Randi

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Re: Sail and Wind Powered Sailing Terms
« Reply #19 on: June 23, 2013, 07:26:05 am »
OK Dean, does the following make sense?
Please add any corrections so that I can post it!
Thanks!





Pointed yards to wind.
Quote from: randi_2
Quote from: dmaschen
Randi:
Yes. With a note of a falling barometer and winds increasing in force  from what you shared I believe they are heading into a storm and they think it will be a 'big one.' They point the yards (the horizontal things that hang perpendicular to the mast and hold the sails - sorry, don't mean to offend if you already know the lingo! ;) ) to minimise the windage. I'd guess that sometime before they had reduced sail. I'm also going to guess that they are 'out of time' or it came too quickly - as some ships would 'scandalise the rigging' and drop the yards to the decks in preparation. They MAY have mentioned something about 'scandalising the topsails' and or top masts earlier.

Sounds like a blow!! Keep in touch!

Hope this helps.

Blessings,  dean

Thanks a lot! Very interesting extra information!

I assume the 'windage' you are talking about is: "3. Nautical The part of the surface of a ship exposed to the wind." ?

See if I have it right: They rotate the yards around the mast so that they are parallel to the wind flow / point into the wind.

There was no mention of sails, but they are moored. This is the 8pm to midnight watch in January 1881. They do have a full moon, but perhaps the lighting is a factor in their decision?
Unfortunately, I don't have any other pages available right now. Keep an eye out for Jamestown ;)


Quote from: dmaschen
...
Yes, you have it right. Moored, I'll guess that the sails are 'off' and or 'rolled up' and they just want an 'easy night' without rolling in the slip or the anchorage wherever they are. The higher stuff is the more the wind affects the ship. Wind in the upper rigging will rock and roll the ship so I'm guessing they just want a 'quiet night.' It will be interesting to see what blows in the next couple watches.


Scandalise - skan′da-līz, v.t. to trice up the tack of the spanker in a square-rigged vessel, or the mainsail in a fore-and-aft rigged one. (http://www.chambersdictionary.info/meaning/scandalise.html)


trice - To hoist and secure with a rope: trice a sail. (http://www.thefreedictionary.com/trice)

I'd go with that!  Triceing up the sails will result in less force at the top of the mast from the wind so the ship will 'rock' less. Pointing the Yards into the wind will further reduce the 'wind effect.' Since they are in 'harbour' they don't care about going anywhere and/or keeping steerage way so they will minimise the windage.

Hope this helps.

Blessings,  dean

Randi

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Re: Sail and Wind Powered Sailing Terms
« Reply #20 on: June 26, 2013, 01:25:32 pm »
Quote
FISHES, SIDE, two long pieces of fir, coaked on the opposite sides of a made-mast to give it the diameter required.

FISH, FRONT, or paunch, a long piece of fir, hollowed on the inside to the convexity of the mast, and rounded on the back. It fastens to the foreside of lower masts in the middle, and adds security and strength. Fishes are also used in the middle of masts, yards, bowsprits, &c. sprung, or damaged at sea.
http://www.hnsa.org/doc/steel/part1.htm

Quote
Fishes. ? Pieces used in made masts ; also cheek pieces carried
to sea on board vessels to secure a crippled mast or yard.
http://archive.org/details/woodenshipbuildi00desmrich

Quote
Ships of war, and large ships, have their masts formed of different pieces. They are called made-masts
http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=nyp.33433008209128;view=1up;seq=65

Quote
FISH, a machine employed to hoist or draw up the flukes of the ship's anchor towards the top of the bow in order to stow it, after having been heaved up by the cable. It is composed of four parts, viz. the pendent, the block, the hook, and the tackle; which, together with their several uses, are described in the article DAVIT.

Fish, (jumelle, Fr.) is also a long piece of oak, convex on one side, and concave on the other. It is used to fasten upon the outside of the lower masts, either as an additional security, to strengthen them when it becomes necessary to carry an extraordinary pressure of sail, in pursuit of, or flight from, an enemy; or to reinforce them after they have received some damage in battle, tempestuous weather, &c.

The fishes are also employed for the same purpose on any yard, which happens to be sprung or fractured. Thus their form, application, and utility are exactly like those of the splinters applied to a broken limb in surgery.
http://southseas.nla.gov.au/refs/falc/0528.html
« Last Edit: June 26, 2013, 01:54:26 pm by Randi »

Randi

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Re: Sail and Wind Powered Sailing Terms
« Reply #21 on: June 30, 2013, 09:40:49 am »
Quote
cross a yard
    To bring a yard from its stored position (vertical) to its working position (horizontal)
http://www.fatefulvoyage.com/g/c.html#crossayard
...
I think this source is possibly unreliable. Yards are in no case that I can conceive ever 'stored vertically'. They may be canted (tipped up) to clear the quay side of the ship while working cargo. Upper yards are often sent down in heavy weather or for winter quarters in the Arctic (and sometimes t'gallant and topmasts) and sent up and 'crossed' again with the return of fair weather.
Quote
cross
42. Nautical . to set (a yard) in proper position on a mast.
31. ( tr ) nautical  to set (the yard of a square sail) athwartships
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/cross


Sailing full and by - that is sailing as close to the wind as possible - sometimes leads to being 'taken aback' a term now in common usage in English which means a (usually unfortunate) surprise. On a square-rigged sailing ship 'taken aback' means getting the wind on the wrong side of the sails, which forces a sudden tack at best or sometimes much worse consequences - all unfortunate surprises. Usually when sailing full & by and braced sharp the helmsman steers not by the compass but by the luff of the uppermost sail on the foremast. This sail will luff (curl a bit to flapping noisily) first, thus giving a warning to ease the helm. Of course a marked wind shift, say when a cold front passes, can also result in being taken aback. [Kevin]


Quote
ABACK. The situation of a ship's sails when the wind bears against their front surfaces. They are laid aback, when this is purposely effected to deaden her way by rounding in the weather-braces; and taken aback, when brought to by an unexpected change of wind, or by inattention in the helmsman.?All aback forward, the notice given from the forecastle, when the head-sails are pressed aback by a sudden change in the wind. (See Work Aback.)?Taken aback, a colloquialism for being suddenly surprised or found out.
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/26000/26000-h/26000-h.htm
Also http://southseas.nla.gov.au/refs/falc/0002.html#3 and http://books.google.fr/books?id=6mGLsY0G1O8C&pg=PA1&dq=taken+aback+square+rigged&hl=en&sa=X&ei=PznQUbemOYfEPYvRgLgG&ved=0CEwQ6AEwBQ#v=onepage&q=taken%20aback%20square%20rigged&f=false


Wore ship
Quote
A jibe or gybe is a sailing maneuver where a sailing vessel reaching downwind turns its stern through the wind, such that the wind direction changes from one side of the boat to the other. For square-rigged ships, this maneuver is called wearing ship.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jibe


Quote
Head-Off - to turn downwind of your current course. Fall off.
http://www.photographers1.com/Sailing/NauticalTerms&Nomenclature.html
« Last Edit: August 26, 2013, 07:50:22 am by Randi »

Dean

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Re: Sail and Wind Powered Sailing Terms
« Reply #22 on: June 30, 2013, 12:53:47 pm »
Maybe a more 'modern' usage but sometimes to 'fish' means to use something to work a wire, rope, halyard, etc. through a fitting or a mast.

As 'we used a long rod to fish the mast light wire up through the mast so it could be connected.' ;)

The boat I race on has lines (halyards, sheets, etc. running through a 'tunnel' on the deck. We have to fish the lines through the tunnel every year as we put the mast back on after the winter.

Kevin

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Re: Sail and Wind Powered Sailing Terms
« Reply #23 on: June 30, 2013, 10:51:09 pm »
Quote
cross a yard
    To bring a yard from its stored position (vertical) to its working position (horizontal)
http://www.fatefulvoyage.com/g/c.html#crossayard

I think this source is possibly unreliable. Yards are in no case that I can conceive ever 'stored vertically'. They may be canted (tipped up) to clear the quay side of the ship while working cargo. Upper yards are often sent down in heavy weather or for winter quarters in the Arctic (and sometimes t'gallant and topmasts) and sent up and 'crossed' again with the return of fair weather.



Dean

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Re: Sail and Wind Powered Sailing Terms
« Reply #24 on: July 25, 2013, 01:03:05 pm »
Thought this may be useful for understanding the ships.

Mods - feel free to move it if there is a better place! ;D

Janet Jaguar

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Re: Sail and Wind Powered Sailing Terms
« Reply #25 on: July 25, 2013, 04:07:03 pm »
This is a good place.  Randi may want to copy it else where.

Randi

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Re: Sail and Wind Powered Sailing Terms
« Reply #26 on: July 25, 2013, 06:49:58 pm »
Very nice!
This is where it belongs ;D

Randi

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Re: Sail and Wind Powered Sailing Terms
« Reply #27 on: September 20, 2013, 12:44:09 pm »
« Last Edit: September 20, 2013, 01:43:26 pm by Randi »

AvastMH

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Re: Sail and Wind Powered Sailing Terms
« Reply #28 on: September 20, 2013, 01:20:07 pm »
I guess that, as one uses the term 'to dress the ship', it must be 'suit'.  :-\

Randi

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Re: Sail and Wind Powered Sailing Terms
« Reply #29 on: September 20, 2013, 01:48:45 pm »
According to the above site, all are used, but suit seems to be the preferred form.