Author Topic: Sail and Wind Powered Sailing Terms  (Read 15328 times)

Janet Jaguar

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Re: Sail and Wind Powered Sailing Terms
« Reply #30 on: September 20, 2013, 04:04:16 pm »
According to the 1898 A Dictionary of Sea Terms, suit and set work.  The first was listed to be defined, the second defined it.

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Suit (of sails). -- A set of sails. Thus a yacht may have several suits, as a suit of racing canvas, of cruising, or of storm sails.

Dean

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Re: Sail and Wind Powered Sailing Terms
« Reply #31 on: September 20, 2013, 05:36:14 pm »
I have a suit of sails for my boat that suit me well! ;D

If I go 'fancy sailing' I have to wear a tux! ::)

Kevin

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Re: Sail and Wind Powered Sailing Terms
« Reply #32 on: September 21, 2013, 04:06:30 pm »
I suppose you could set your suit in light airs, being careful to suit your set to the wind. And being ever watchful against being unsuitably set on a lee shore.

Janet Jaguar

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Re: Sail and Wind Powered Sailing Terms
« Reply #33 on: September 21, 2013, 04:21:23 pm »
Did you know "set" has the most definitions for a word in the English Language?  It is a noun, adjective, transitive verb and intransitive verb.  :)

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http://puzzles.about.com/library/weekly/blmosdef.htm
The word SET has the most definitions of any word in the English language. SET has 464 definitions in the Oxford English Dictionary. Here's how the others stack up:
RUN - 396 (defs.)
GO - 368
TAKE - 343
STAND - 334
GET - 289
TURN - 288
PUT - 268
FALL - 264
STRIKE - 250

We do like playing with alternate meanings for a word, in all hemispheres.  :D

Randi

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Re: Sail and Wind Powered Sailing Terms
« Reply #34 on: September 21, 2013, 07:47:12 pm »
"A boomkin, sometimes referred to as a bumkin or as a bumpkin, consists of an exceptionally strong and usually wooden spar that projects forwards and often (though not always) downwards over the main head-rail of a traditional western sailing ship, one on either side of the vessel ..." - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boomkin (picture)

Kevin

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Re: Sail and Wind Powered Sailing Terms
« Reply #35 on: September 23, 2013, 02:24:18 pm »
Same source: Over time the use of boomkins was extended to the stern of the ship as well to provide an attachment point for a backstay or the sheet of a mizzen. This flickr set (just discovered) has several pictures of the 'Westward' boomkin (check out the OWL). Turns out this was a voyage I was on (who knew?). http://www.flickr.com/photos/mcgervey/255758366/in/set-72157594275311052/lightbox/

Randi

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Re: Sail and Wind Powered Sailing Terms
« Reply #36 on: October 07, 2013, 01:58:21 pm »
Ratlines and rattling down

Quote from: Janet Jaguar
...
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A Dictionary of Sea Terms - The 1898 version of A. Ansted's guide for 'yachtsmen, amateur boatmen, and beginners'; full of useful information.   (Text-only version at A Dictionary of Sea Terms)

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from A Dictionary of Sea Terms in Helpful Links
 
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Ratlines (pronounced "ratlins" or "ratt-
lings") rattling down. — The name is possibly
derived from a supposed resemblance to rats'
tails. — Small lines crossing the shrouds of a
ship and forming the steps of ladders. Fixing
these ratlines to the shrouds, which is done by
a simple seizing and clove hitches, is called rat-
tling down the rigging. When they are placed
too closely together they constitute that which
is called, in derision, a lady's ladder."

Kevin

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Re: Sail and Wind Powered Sailing Terms
« Reply #37 on: October 09, 2013, 05:57:56 pm »
An experienced sailor will always hold on to the shrouds and never to the ratlines. The seizings securing the ratlines are prone to breaking and if holding on to one when this occurs an inconvenience may result. (The higher you are, the more inconvenient.)

Janet Jaguar

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Re: Sail and Wind Powered Sailing Terms
« Reply #38 on: October 09, 2013, 06:04:08 pm »
That makes total sense - smart people climb any ladder that way.  Still, it's nice to have an easy place for your feet.

Randi

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Re: Sail and Wind Powered Sailing Terms
« Reply #39 on: October 09, 2013, 07:08:18 pm »
 ;D

Dean

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Re: Sail and Wind Powered Sailing Terms
« Reply #40 on: October 10, 2013, 09:55:46 pm »
An experienced sailor will always hold on to the shrouds and never to the ratlines. The seizings securing the ratlines are prone to breaking and if holding on to one when this occurs an inconvenience may result. (The higher you are, the more inconvenient.)

It's not the fall that does the damage. It's the last cm. or the sudden stop at the bottom!! ::)

Randi

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Re: Sail and Wind Powered Sailing Terms
« Reply #41 on: October 23, 2013, 07:48:17 am »
Chapel / Chappel

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(Naut.) To cause (a ship taken aback in a light breeze) so to turn or make a circuit as to recover, without bracing the yards, the same tack on which she had been sailing.
http://www.webster-dictionary.net/definition/chapel

Annual report of the Secretary of the Navy (1878) - http://archive.org/stream/annualreportofse1878unit#page/54/mode/2up/search/chappeling
http://nq.oxfordjournals.org/content/s11-XII/289/26-c.extract
http://southseas.nla.gov.au/refs/falc/0317.html