Author Topic: Old Space Weather: sightings of aurorae and sunspots  (Read 40560 times)

Craig

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Re: Old Space Weather: sightings of aurorae and sunspots
« Reply #30 on: December 25, 2012, 01:32:45 pm »
Thanks, Clewi. I forgot you had posted it.

Janet Jaguar

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Re: Old Space Weather: sightings of aurorae and sunspots
« Reply #31 on: December 25, 2012, 03:18:02 pm »
Actually, they are different.  Dean posted for Tuesday, Sept. 2nd.  Clewi posted for Thursday, Sept. 25th, with meteors added. 

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ow3/final/USS%20Jeannette/vol001of004/vol001_097_1.jpg
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ow3/final/USS%20Jeannette/vol001of004/vol001_120_1.jpg

The autumn of 1879 clearly had an active sky. :)

Clewi

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Re: Old Space Weather: sightings of aurorae and sunspots
« Reply #32 on: December 25, 2012, 04:00:30 pm »
In fact, they are both listed there, among others. I will update the list as they keep coming.

Clewi

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Re: Old Space Weather: sightings of aurorae and sunspots
« Reply #33 on: December 31, 2012, 01:10:20 pm »
Ah, old Jeanette....full of miracles:

2.12.1879 PM:

Quote
Weather misty until 7 when it cleared off. Very beautifull night. Moon and stars very bright. Lunar haloes showing prismatic colors at times. Lunar rainbow in the S at 10.30. Auroral arch (34? in altitude) from NNE to NNW (mag) which at 11.50 flashed into a magnificient auroral curtain.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ow3/final/USS%20Jeannette/vol001of004/vol001_189_1.jpg

Drifting locked in pack noon lat 71 50 N, measured on planet Venus at meridian 12.11.1879; long not measured

« Last Edit: August 24, 2013, 07:34:20 pm by Janet Jaguar »

Pommy Stuart

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Re: Old Space Weather: sightings of aurorae and sunspots
« Reply #34 on: January 25, 2013, 11:39:01 pm »
Rodgers, St Lawrence Bay, Siberia.  23 Nov 1881. 8PM to Midnight.
Very brilliant and grand display of the Aurora, the brightest part in NW. The light extended from E to W by the N to Zenith. - The light was so bright at times that objects could be seen at some distances more distinctly than during the brightest moonlight - the stars were particularly bright, The light would pass over the heavens like waves, the outer edges of which were dark blue color and would then run into each other like waves seen in shoal water.

(Must have been a quiet night if that was all he had to write about.  ;D  )


http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ow3/USS%20Rodgers/Rodgers_1881/b001of010_0182_1.jpg
St. Lawrence Bay, Siberia  map lat/long 65.67, -171.08   
« Last Edit: March 28, 2013, 02:59:35 am by Janet Jaguar »

Randi

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Re: Old Space Weather: sightings of aurorae and sunspots
« Reply #35 on: January 27, 2013, 08:12:49 am »
Note to Clewi & others transcribing aurora: I asked the PI of Solar Stormwatch about whether these obs would be useful. Here is his answer:

"That's a definite yes! Building up historical sequences of auroral observations is really quite important in studying solar activity before the space age."

I guess we'll be talking about this some more, but if aurora interests you I'd say the prime directive applies: if you enjoy it, keep doing it (and it looks like there is good reason to). AFTER the vegetables please!  :)


THANK YOU, Kevin!

No need to quote auroral observations here if you don't want to (or if there are a lot of them), but it might be helpful to note the ship and the dates (or range of dates) - however, that is strictly optional!
(As most of you know, you can create a single post for the ship and then go back and add dates.)

AvastMH

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Re: Old Space Weather: sightings of aurorae and sunspots
« Reply #36 on: February 02, 2013, 08:06:34 pm »
The Rodgers: Aurora records

03/10/1881   
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ow3/USS%20Rodgers/Rodgers_1881/b001of010_0131_1.jpg   
Between Herald Ild and Cape Serdze-Kamen   
Quote
Between 2 and 3. a.m. bright display of Northern Light
...
Ice blink on starboard beam between 9+11 P.m.
Between 71.39, -175.65 and 66.91, -171.63


05/10/1881
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ow3/USS%20Rodgers/Rodgers_1881/b001of010_0133_1.jpg   
Standing off Cape Serdze-Kamen
Quote
8 to midnight: Bright moonlight + starlight Aurora to Nd.
near 66.91, -171.63


24/10/1881
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ow3/USS%20Rodgers/Rodgers_1881/b001of010_0152_1.jpg
St Lawrence Bay, Siberia
Quote
8pm to Mid:  Very brilliant display of aurora visible from  NW by N to NE by N. brightest portion NNW.
65 40 0 N, 171 05 0 W ;     65.67, -171.09


27/10/1881
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ow3/USS%20Rodgers/Rodgers_1881/b001of010_0155_1.jpg
St Lawrence Bay, Siberia
Quote
Commence to 4 am:  At 3.20 saw a very vivid meteor in the N'd + W'd
65 40 0 N, 171 05 0 W ;     65.67, -171.09


28/10/1881
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ow3/USS%20Rodgers/Rodgers_1881/b001of010_0156_1.jpg
St Lawrence Bay, Siberia
Quote
Commence to 4:  At 1.15 brilliant Aurora began.
65 40 0 N, 171 05 0 W ;     65.67, -171.09


29/10/1881
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ow3/USS%20Rodgers/Rodgers_1881/b001of010_0157_1.jpg
St Lawrence Bay, Siberia
Quote
Commence to 4:  At 1.15 brilliant Aurora began.
65 40 0 N, 171 05 0 W ;     65.67, -171.09


30/10/1881
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ow3/USS%20Rodgers/Rodgers_1881/b001of010_0158_1.jpg
St Lawrence Bay, Siberia
Quote
Commence to 4:  Display of Aurora.
65 40 0 N, 171 05 0 W ;     65.67, -171.09


21/11/1881
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ow3/USS%20Rodgers/Rodgers_1881/b001of010_0180_1.jpg
St Lawrence Bay, Siberia
Quote
Commence to 4:  Display of aurora during the watch - not very bright
65 40 0 N, 171 05 0 W ;     65.67, -171.09


23/11/1881
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ow3/USS%20Rodgers/Rodgers_1881/b001of010_0182_1.jpg
St Lawrence Bay, Siberia
Quote
8 pm to midnight:  Very brilliant and grand display of the aurora - the brightest part in the NW.  The light extended from the E. to W. by N., and to the zenith - The light was so bright at times that objects could be seen at some distance more  distinctly than during the brightest moonlight - the stars were particularly bright - The light would pass over the heavens like waves, the outer edges of which were of  dark blue color & would then run into each other like waves seen in shoal water.
65 40 0 N, 171 05 0 W ;     65.67, -171.09


24/11/1881
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ow3/USS%20Rodgers/Rodgers_1881/b001of010_0183_1.jpg
St Lawrence Bay, Siberia
Quote
Commence to 4: Display of aurora but not so bright as previous watch - but in same direction & same form
65 40 0 N, 171 05 0 W ;     65.67, -171.09


26/11/1881
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ow3/USS%20Rodgers/Rodgers_1881/b001of010_0185_1.jpg
St Lawrence Bay, Siberia
Quote
8 to Midnight:  Display of Aurora
65 40 0 N, 171 05 0 W ;     65.67, -171.09
« Last Edit: March 29, 2013, 03:53:13 am by Janet Jaguar »

olems

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Re: Old Space Weather: sightings of aurorae and sunspots
« Reply #37 on: February 03, 2013, 05:32:23 pm »
Rodgers, beginning of Oct.

03/10/1881
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ow3/USS%20Rodgers/Rodgers_1881/b001of010_0131_1.jpg
"Between 2 and 3. a.m. bright display of Northern Light"
"Ice blink on starboard beam between 9+11 P.m."
« Last Edit: February 03, 2013, 06:14:42 pm by olems »

AvastMH

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Re: Old Space Weather: sightings of aurorae and sunspots
« Reply #38 on: February 03, 2013, 07:02:06 pm »
Hi Olems,
Trying to be a bit helpful I thought I'd start a list of Rodgers' obs for phenomena -  so I popped yours into it - hope that's OK!
Joan

olems

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Re: Old Space Weather: sightings of aurorae and sunspots
« Reply #39 on: February 05, 2013, 11:51:50 pm »
Looks great  :)

Here's another:

05/10/1881
http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ow3/USS%20Rodgers/Rodgers_1881/b001of010_0133_1.jpg
8 to midnight:
"Bright moonlight + starlight Aurora to Nd."

Ensign Stoney has a rather open relationship with punctuation, but he's excused considering the conditions they were under.

AvastMH

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Re: Old Space Weather: sightings of aurorae and sunspots
« Reply #40 on: February 06, 2013, 12:08:07 am »

Ensign Stoney has a rather open relationship with punctuation, but he's excused considering the conditions they were under.
  ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D   a very true observation

05/10/81's aurora installed on list....grand :D

Randi

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Re: Old Space Weather: sightings of aurorae and sunspots
« Reply #41 on: February 07, 2013, 06:50:02 pm »
Keep an eye out for this:
Quote
On September 1?2, 1859, the largest recorded geomagnetic storm occurred. Aurorae were seen around the world, even over the Caribbean; those over the Rocky Mountains were so bright that their glow awoke gold miners, who began preparing breakfast because they thought it was morning.[3] People who happened to be awake in the northeastern US could read a newspaper by the aurora's light.[4]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_storm_of_1859

Tegwen

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Re: Old Space Weather: sightings of aurorae and sunspots
« Reply #42 on: February 08, 2013, 01:21:58 pm »
Keep an eye out for this:
Quote
On September 1?2, 1859, the largest recorded geomagnetic storm occurred. Aurorae were seen around the world, even over the Caribbean; those over the Rocky Mountains were so bright that their glow awoke gold miners, who began preparing breakfast because they thought it was morning.[3] People who happened to be awake in the northeastern US could read a newspaper by the aurora's light.[4]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_storm_of_1859

It probably wont be in this league, but coincidentally I just received an email from Aurora Watch UK to say that tonight, peaking at 12.50 there is an amber warning for an aurora in the UK.

AuroraWatch UK amber alert, 2013-02-08 12:50:01UT. http://aurorawatch.lancs.ac.uk/

Pommy Stuart

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Re: Old Space Weather: sightings of aurorae and sunspots
« Reply #43 on: March 21, 2013, 04:13:54 am »
An Aurora sighted at New London Conn 16 July 1982. That's a fair way down is it not, and mid summer there.
Starts at 8:45PM with an interesting description of what was seen and finished at 11:45PM

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ow3/final/USS%20Concord/vol013of040/vol013of040_150_1.jpg

(and yet another Court Martial taking place on the same page)
« Last Edit: March 21, 2013, 04:18:20 am by Pommy Stuart »

Janet Jaguar

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Re: Old Space Weather: sightings of aurorae and sunspots
« Reply #44 on: March 21, 2013, 04:58:47 am »
The location makes that very interesting, but "16 July 1982" ??? :o