Author Topic: Terms found in US log books  (Read 10367 times)

Randi

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Terms found in US log books
« on: April 17, 2013, 02:35:03 pm »
Feel free to add to this topic!

I decided to start listing words I looked up while doing the log for Thetis. They may be useful, but they are probably not important enough to put in OWpedia or Sail and Wind Powered Sailing Terms (I may add some later).





arming, lead arming
tallow put in the hollow of a sounding lead. See To arm the lead - http://www.thefreedictionary.com/Lead+arming
"The lead weight was usually conical in shape, sometimes with a touch of wax or lard on the base to collect a small sample of the surficial sediment." - http://woodshole.er.usgs.gov/operations/sfmapping/bathyhist.htm

Bath Brick also called Bristol Brick
"...  It started in 1820 when it was discovered that using silt from the river bank, bricks could be made which when scraped would produce a gritty substance suitable for scouring metal.  It was a predecessor to Vim and Ajax.  ..." - http://www.bridgwatersomerset.info/history_7_bath_brick.php

bbl. --- You also see Bll
abbr. barrel - http://www.thefreedictionary.com/bbl.
http://www.natemaas.com/2011/01/correction-why-bbl-is-not-abbreviation.html

BEE
A ring or hoop of metal.
BEE-BLOCKS. Pieces of hard wood bolted to the outer end of the bowsprit, to reeve the fore-topmast stays through, the bolt, serving as a pin, commonly called bees.
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/26000/26000-h/26000-h.htm#B

BREAD-ROOM.
The lowest and aftermost part of the orlop deck, where the biscuit is kept, separated by a bulk-head from the rest; but any place parted off from below deck for containing the bread is so designated.
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/26000/26000-h/26000-h.htm#B

bull rope
Some conflicting definitions.
http://www.hnsa.org/doc/merchant/deck/part2.htm - especially p27
http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/bull_rope
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/bull+rope

cod line
an eighteen-thread line used in catching codfish. - http://www.webster-dictionary.net/definition/cod%20line

commander
A heavy beetle or wooden mallet, used in paving, in sail lofts, etc. - http://www.webster-dictionary.net/definition/commander
and http://www.loghomestore.com/1019-jumbo-wooden-commander-mallet.php

CROSS IN THE HAWSE.
"Is when a ship moored with two anchors from the bows has swung the wrong way once, whereby the two cables lie across each other.?To cross a vessel's hawse is to sail across the line of her course, a little ahead of her." - http://www.gutenberg.org/files/26000/26000-h/26000-h.htm#C

Coston pistols
Coston Flares / night signals - http://www.civilwarsignals.org/pages/signal/signalpages/flare/coston.html

crowfoot
A number of small cords rove through a long block, or euphroe, to suspend an awning by. - http://www.webster-dictionary.net/definition/crowfoot

Dent chronometer
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dent_%28clocks_and_watches%29#Chronometers

ELBOW IN THE HAWSE.
"Two crosses in a hawse. When a ship, being moored in a tide-way, swings twice the wrong way, thereby causing the cables to take half a round turn on each other." - http://www.gutenberg.org/files/26000/26000-h/26000-h.htm#E

escutcheon:
(Naut.) That part of a vessel's stern on which her name is written.
(Carp.) A thin metal plate or shield to protect wood, or for ornament, as the shield around a keyhole.
- http://www.webster-dictionary.net/definition/Escutcheon
escutcheon pin:
A decorative nail with a round, domed head, usually made of, or plated with, brass or copper, and used for fastening escutcheons, label-card holders, or other decorative surface hardware to wood surfaces. - http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/escutcheon_pin

Frodsham chronometer
http://www.antiques-marine.com/chronometers/1375/

frog
The Navy referred to its holsters as frogs during this period and, in fact, they more closely resemble the sword and bayonet frogs of the day than true holsters.

gin block
a simple form of tackle block, having one wheel, over which a rope runs; - called also whip gin, rubbish pulley, and monkey wheel. - http://www.webster-dictionary.net/definition/gin%20block

gun tackle
a block-and-tackle arrangement formerly used for running a gun carriage to and from a gun part or raising or lowering a gun - http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/gun%20tackle
A block and tackle with a mechanical advantage of 2: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pulley
http://hdl.handle.net/2027/nyp.33433008209128?urlappend=%3Bseq=60

hackler or hackle
A comb for dressing flax, raw silk, etc.; a hatchel.
To separate, as the coarse part of flax or hemp from the fine, by drawing it through the teeth of a hackle or hatchel. - http://www.webster-dictionary.net/definition/hackle and http://www.webster-dictionary.net/definition/hatchel

harness cask
A tub lashed to a vessel's deck and containing salted provisions for daily use; - called also harness tub. - http://www.webster-dictionary.net/definition/Harness%20cask
AND
HARNESS, HARNESS CASK
The tub in which salt meat was soaked before being cooked in order to extract
the brine in which the meat had been pickled; also known as STEEP TUB. The
tub was in the charge of the cook whose duty it was to take adequate
precautions for its safety on the onset of bad weather. The name is said to
have been introduced by cynics of early days either because they felt the
harness was the only part of the horse not in the tub, or else from the
leathery nature of the meat. - 1775 British Naval Slang - http://www.hmsrichmond.org/dict_h.htm

HAWSE
'This is a term of great meaning. Strictly, it is that part of a vessel's bow where holes are cut for her cables to pass through. It is also generally understood to imply the situation of the cables before the ship's stem, when she is moored with two anchors out from forward, one on the starboard, and the other on the port bow. It also denotes any small distance between her head and the anchors employed to ride her, as "he has anchored in our hawse," ... "Clearing hawse," is untwisting or disentangling two cables that come through different holes, and make a foul hawse.' - http://www.gutenberg.org/files/26000/26000-h/26000-h.htm#HAWSE

horn-card (Piddington)
Transparent graduated horn-plates to use on charts, either as protractors or for meteorological purposes, to represent the direction of the wind in a cyclone. - The Sailor's Word-Book, by W. H. Smyth - http://www.gutenberg.org/files/26000/26000-h/26000-h.htm
https://archive.org/stream/sailorshornbook02piddgoog#page/n156/mode/2up
http://www.weathernotebook.com/transcripts/2004/12/31.php

houseline, housing, house-line
A small line formed of three fine strands, smaller than rope yarn; principally used for seizings of the block-strops, fastening the clues of sails to their bolt-ropes, and other purposes. - http://www.gutenberg.org/files/26000/26000-h/26000-h.htm

jigger
(Naut.) A light tackle, consisting of a double and single block and the fall, used for various purposes, as to increase the purchase on a topsail sheet in hauling it home; the watch tackle. - http://www.webster-dictionary.net/definition/jigger

joiner
One whose occupation is to construct articles by joining pieces of wood; a mechanic who does the woodwork (as doors, stairs, etc.) necessary for the finishing of buildings. - http://www.webster-dictionary.net/definition/joiner

junk
1.   Pieces of old cable or old cordage, used for making gaskets, mats, swabs, etc., and when picked to pieces, forming oakum for filling the seams of ships.
4.   (Naut.) Hard salted beef supplied to ships. - http://www.webster-dictionary.net/definition/junk

kid
a small wooden tub - http://www.thefreedictionary.com/kid

Larboard / Starboard / Port
Historical background: http://books.google.fr/books?id=wvKiBiWKrzMC&pg=PA311&lpg=PA311&dq=%22steer+board%22+%22load+board%22&source=bl&ots=sk07Ou12Ru&sig=HkhGOJOhkiPkKmpE7vllzAZtEwI&hl=en&sa=X&ei=alzlUszJPOWd0QW5-IGYCg&ved=0CC8Q6AEwAQ#v=onepage&q=%22steer%20board%22%20%22load%20board%22&f=false

loosed sails to dry
http://collections.rmg.co.uk/collections/objects/144053.html

MARLE, To
To wind marline, spun-yarn, twine, &c., about a rope, so that every turn is secured by a kind of knot, and remains fixed, in case the rest should be cut through by friction. It is commonly used to fasten slips of canvas, called parsling, upon the surface of a rope, to prevent its being galled, or to attach the foot of a sail to its bolt-rope, &c., with marling hitches, instead of sewing it. - http://www.gutenberg.org/files/26000/26000-h/26000-h.htm#LINE+

marline
A small line composed of two strands a little twisted, used for winding around ropes and cables, to prevent their being weakened by fretting. - http://www.webster-dictionary.net/definition/marline
Mar-line. A particular kind of small line, composed of two strands very little twisted; there is both tarred and white mar-line. - http://www.gutenberg.org/files/26000/26000-h/26000-h.htm#LINE

Negus chronometer
John D. Negus was a highly respected nautical instrument maker and was arguably the leading makers in the United States during the second half of the 19th century. Trained in England, Negus began manufacturing in New York City in 1848. The company moved to 100 Wall Street, New York City in 1864 and formed the navigational instrument making firm, "T.S. & J.D. Negus," in 1869. According to research of period U.S. Navy records, T.S. & J.D. Negus sold chronometers and other instruments to the U.S. Navy including compasses. In 1937 the Negus brothers bought the Ritchie Compass Company and sixteen years later sold it to the Sherman Brothers in 1953. At that time Ritchie moved to Pembroke, Mass. The firm continued under the trade name "Negus" as a nautical instrument manufacturer and retailer into the 20th century. - http://www.wiw2u.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=appraisal.certificate&act=form&item_id=98551

Orderly Sergeant
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_sergeant#United_States_Marine_Corps
http://books.google.fr/books?id=t_t_pIcBe5gC&pg=PA73&lpg=PA73&dq=orderly+sergeant+usmc&source=bl&ots=isSGJm_TEk&sig=7uNIU6YJA8CrHN9tr8-hxy7xQrY&hl=en&sa=X&ei=F032UsL3O-3G7AaJv4GIBQ&ved=0CE0Q6AEwBDgK#v=onepage&q=orderly%20sergeant%20usmc&f=false

pickle
   1.   A solution of salt and water, in which fish, meat, etc., may be preserved or corned; brine.
   2.   Any article of food which has been preserved in brine or in vinegar. - http://www.webster-dictionary.net/definition/pickle

ORLOP.
The lowest deck, formerly called "over-lop," consisting of a platform laid over the beams in the hold of ships of war, whereon the cables were usually coiled, and containing some cabins as well as the chief store-rooms. In trading vessels it is often a temporary deck.
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/26000/26000-h/26000-h.htm#O

pipe lagger
Many insulators were employed on ships. Steam boilers found on oceangoing vessels and discharge pressurized gas at high temperatures. Because the piping must be able to withstand extremely high pressures and fluctuations without deforming, it is typically made from metal. Exterior surfaces often became hot enough to present an extreme physical injury hazard and a fire risk. As a result, ship pipes were insulated.
For most of the 20th century, shipyard lagging, or insulation, that was applied to pipes was made of heat-resistant asbestos. Easily manufactured in sheets and mats, the low-cost microscopic fibers were ideal for creating insulation that could be wrapped around pipes. Additionally, asbestos was commonly used in tape and adhesives that were used to secure the insulation. - http://www.asbestos.com/occupations/insulators.php

Raven's-duck
A fine quality of sailcloth. - http://www.webster-dictionary.net/definition/Raven%27s-duck

scuttle butt
a butt or cask with a large hole in it, used to contain the fresh water for daily use in a ship. - http://www.webster-dictionary.net/definition/scuttle%20butt

send down
The yards represent a considerable weight high above the vessel's centre of gravity. To increase stability, especially in heavy weather, some means is normally provided to lower some of the yards when they are not being used to set sails. In nineteenth-century warships (where a large crew was available) this was generally by physically "sending down" the upper yards from the masts and storing them on deck - along with, in many cases, the upper sections of the mast itself. - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yard_%28sailing%29
AND
Variant of scend. See Scandalise: http://forum.oldweather.org/index.php?topic=3515.msg58145#msg58145

sheave
A wheel having a groove in the rim for a rope to work in, and set in a block, mast, or the like; the wheel of a pulley. - http://www.webster-dictionary.net/definition/Sheave

ship
To put in its place; as, to ship the tiller or rudder. - http://www.webster-dictionary.net/definition/ship

shipwrights
One that builds or repairs ships. AND a person who builds and launches wooden vessels or does carpentry work on steel or iron vessels. - http://www.thefreedictionary.com/shipwright

shoe block
SHOE-BLOCKS are two single blocks, cut in a solid piece, transversely to each other. They are used for legs and sails of the buntlines, but are seldom used. - http://www.hnsa.org/doc/steel/part5.htm#pg156 AND http://www.hnsa.org/doc/steel/large/blocks1.htm (far left, 3'rd from top)

sister blocks
http://www.hnsa.org/doc/steel/part5.htm#pg156 AND http://www.hnsa.org/doc/steel/large/blocks1.htm

sister hooks
http://www.history.navy.mil/research/library/online-reading-room/title-list-alphabetically/s/shiploading-picture-dictionary.html

snatch block
a kind of block with an opening in one side to receive the bight of a rope. - http://www.webster-dictionary.net/definition/snatch%20block
AND http://hdl.handle.net/2027/nyp.33433008209128?urlappend=%3Bseq=60

spun yarn
(Naut.)    a line formed of two or more rope-yarns loosely twisted. - http://www.webster-dictionary.net/definition/spun%20yarn
and http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=nyp.33433008209128;view=1up;seq=18

squeegee, squilgee or sometimes squimjim
"... is a tool with a flat, smooth rubber blade, used to remove or control the flow of liquid on a flat surface. ... The original squilgee was a long-handled, wooden-bladed tool fishermen used to scrape fish blood and scales from their boat deck, and to push water off the deck after it had been washed." - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Squeegee

stand of grape
"... was originally designed to inflict damage on the tall rigging on sailing ships but was considered obsolete by the Civil War, having generally been replaced by canister." - http://www.relicman.com/artillery/zArchiveArt.zCanister.00.htm
AND
http://www.civilwarartillery.com/projectiles/canister/IIIA30.htm

steep tub
A tub in which salt beef and salt pork are soaked before cooking. - http://www.wordnik.com/words/steep-tub

thimble
 A ring of thin metal formed with a grooved circumference so as to fit within an eye-spice, or the like, and protect it from chafing. - http://www.webster-dictionary.net/definition/thimble
AND
http://hdl.handle.net/2027/nyp.33433008209128?urlappend=%3Bseq=59

tormentor
"a long fork used by a ship's cook to take meat out of the coppers" - Thursday Next - http://www.finedictionary.com/tormentor.html

turpentine chest
turpentine and alcohol are stowed in a "turpentine chest" aft, on the upper deck, to be readily thrown overboard in case of fire, if necessary. - http://www.hnsa.org/doc/luce/part4.htm

Water Whip
OWpedia: http://forum.oldweather.org/index.php?topic=3209.msg52817#msg52817

whip
A hoist consisting of a single rope passing through an overhead pulley.- http://www.thefreedictionary.com/whip
AND
http://hdl.handle.net/2027/nyp.33433008209128?urlappend=%3Bseq=60

wooden commander - see commander
« Last Edit: June 26, 2016, 10:35:27 am by Randi »

Janet Jaguar

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Re: Terms found in US log books
« Reply #1 on: October 23, 2013, 06:21:11 pm »
hydro.   Hydrometer  Instrument to measure the density (salinity) of sea water.  Temperature must be known to calculate the salinity of the water. 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrometer


Randi

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Re: Terms found in US log books
« Reply #2 on: January 17, 2014, 02:25:25 pm »

Randi

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Craig

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Re: Terms found in US log books
« Reply #4 on: June 17, 2014, 11:51:52 am »
Gripe
A sailing vessel gripes when, by poor design or imbalance of sail, it tends to end up with its bow into the wind when sailing close-hauled. The sails flap around, forward progress is halted and she is very hard to steer. On land, the term means to complain, complain, complain.

Danny252

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Re: Terms found in US log books
« Reply #5 on: August 08, 2014, 07:02:11 pm »
Lignum Vitae Bearings/Lignum Bearings

Lignum Vitae is a type of incredibly strong and dense wood from Central and South America, and as a result of its properties it was used for various naval fittings for centuries. It later found an important use in propeller and turbine bearings, where its self-lubricating properties avoided the need for oiling in difficult to reach areas, and was widely used until the 1960s. According to Wikipedia, lignum vitae bearings were even used in the construction of the first nuclear-powered submarine, the USS Nautilus! This Popular Mechanics article discusses the material's use in propeller shafts.
« Last Edit: August 08, 2014, 07:10:40 pm by Danny252 »

Randi

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Re: Terms found in US log books
« Reply #6 on: August 08, 2014, 07:06:42 pm »
 8)

Danny252

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Re: Terms found in US log books
« Reply #7 on: August 10, 2014, 11:41:42 pm »
Knock Off

To stop work, similar to the colloquial phrase. E.g. "Commenced coaling at 1.15 and knocked off at 5.40"

Danny252

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Re: Terms found in US log books
« Reply #8 on: September 05, 2014, 10:06:12 pm »
Comox coal - coal from the Comox area of Vancouver Island.

Pram or Norwegian Pram - a small utility boat or dinghy with a transom (flat) bow - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pram_%28boat%29

(Note that at an earlier time, "pram" referred to a larger type of flat bottomed ship used to handle cargo, and also used by the French to carry cannons - the term "Norwegian Pram" refers specifically to the smaller boat)
« Last Edit: September 05, 2014, 10:13:41 pm by Danny252 »

Janet Jaguar

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Re: Terms found in US log books
« Reply #9 on: September 05, 2014, 11:13:34 pm »
Makes me wonder how that relates to the English calling a baby buggy a "pram".

Danny252

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Re: Terms found in US log books
« Reply #10 on: September 05, 2014, 11:24:55 pm »
As far as I can tell, there isn't an obvious connection. A pram for babies comes from "perambulator", deriving from the Latin "perambulo" (which itself is a modification of the word "ambulo", to travel or walk). A pram on the water is from the Dutch "praam", which Dutch Wikipedia states comes from the Latin "premere" (to press, pursue, or hit, referencing pushing a boat along with a barge pole) - at least, I think that's what Google translate is trying to tell me!
« Last Edit: September 05, 2014, 11:26:58 pm by Danny252 »

Janet Jaguar

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Re: Terms found in US log books
« Reply #11 on: September 06, 2014, 01:12:32 am »
Makes sense.  It's a long way from the first time that two different sources gave different definitions to the same English word.  :)

Kookaburra

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Re: Terms found in US log books
« Reply #12 on: September 30, 2014, 08:03:02 pm »
Ice blink (1888 Thetis logs use this term regularly)

Ice blink is the white light seen on the horizon, especially on the underside of low clouds, resulting from reflection of light off a field of ice immediately beyond.

Randi

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Re: Terms found in US log books
« Reply #13 on: September 30, 2014, 08:30:14 pm »

Kookaburra

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Re: Terms found in US log books
« Reply #14 on: September 30, 2014, 08:33:26 pm »
well darn.  I thought I looked around enough.  And you have given me a whole new set of terms to become familiar with.  How many ways can you say "ice"?
« Last Edit: September 30, 2014, 09:17:20 pm by Kookaburra »