Author Topic: Terms found in US log books  (Read 13303 times)

Janet Jaguar

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Re: Terms found in US log books
« Reply #15 on: September 30, 2014, 08:49:49 pm »
As many as you need to understand what to do in any specific situation to survive in the arctic?  :)

We collect lots of things in reference post because it is all too much to remember.  Try these to find more:

Old Weather Forum/Library/Reference Desk

Included there, index posts for references in other boards:
Vocabulary and Place Names Help - Index of Helpful Topics
Transcription Help - Index of Helpful Topics

Danny252

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Re: Terms found in US log books
« Reply #16 on: October 11, 2014, 05:30:34 pm »
Drift lead

A heavy lead put overboard when a ship is at anchor with a line attached and left slack so that its tautening will indicate any drift or dragging (Merriam Webster)

e.g. "Put drift lead over at 10:00 and noted strong N'ly current"

Seine Net, Seine Fishing, Seiner, Seining

A Seine net (or dragnet) is a type of fishing net, which hangs vertically in the water at the surface, with weights along the bottom edge and floats along the top (this is in contrast to a trawl net, which is dragged underwater or along the sea bottom). Seining is the act of fishing with a seine net - this can either be done with a fishing boat, known as a Seiner, or by hand. Wikipedia.

e.g. "Several seining and hunting parties left the ship".
« Last Edit: October 16, 2014, 09:42:49 pm by Danny252 »

Danny252

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Re: Terms found in US log books
« Reply #17 on: November 22, 2014, 08:46:58 pm »
Sou'wester

A type of oilskin (waterproof) hat, which is longer at the back to protect the neck from rain, sometimes also provided with a "gutter" front to keep rain out of the wearer's eyes.


Danny252

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Re: Terms found in US log books
« Reply #18 on: December 15, 2014, 09:50:16 pm »
Dory, Doree or Dori

A small, flat-bottomed boat, often used for fishing, with very few other distinguishing features - if you think of a typical fisherman's boat, the image that comes to mind is probably a dory! It is usually powered by oars, but can also be fitted with sails or a motor.

« Last Edit: December 15, 2014, 09:52:44 pm by Danny252 »

Hurlock

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Re: Terms found in US log books
« Reply #19 on: May 07, 2015, 02:28:06 pm »
Wildcat A chain wheel on a windlass

Under slow bells - Operating a large vessel at a slow speed, but fast enough to maintain steerageway.

Prahm - Flat bottomed boat (alternate spelling)

Randi

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Re: Terms found in US log books
« Reply #20 on: May 07, 2015, 02:30:06 pm »
Thanks ;)

Hurlock

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Re: Terms found in US log books
« Reply #21 on: May 27, 2015, 06:13:25 pm »
Dressing Ship Displaying flags in honour of a person or event.  Usually from 8am to Sunset
Dressing Ship Rainbow Fashion display all your flags as bunting in a line from stem to stern via the top of the masts.  Sometimes starting with the shore to the jib boom and ending in the water from the stern.

Randi

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Re: Terms found in US log books
« Reply #22 on: May 27, 2015, 06:39:45 pm »
Thanks.
(We have some notes on Dressing a ship in the OWpedia ;))

AvastMH

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Re: Terms found in US log books
« Reply #23 on: May 27, 2015, 07:35:32 pm »
Dressing Ship Displaying flags in honour of a person or event.  Usually from 8am to Sunset
Dressing Ship Rainbow Fashion display all your flags as bunting in a line from stem to stern via the top of the masts.  Sometimes starting with the shore to the jib boom and ending in the water from the stern.

Sounds pretty - did the navy supply any buckets of gold at the end of the rainbow? Don't tell me - let me guess - Nnnngghhh - I'm thinking hard - it's coming through....'No!'  ::) ;D

HatterJack

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Re: Terms found in US log books
« Reply #24 on: September 17, 2015, 05:55:46 am »
Found one that I'm a bit surprised to see having gone unmentioned thus far (unless I missed it).

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ow3/final/Albatross/vol018of055/vol018of055_088_1.jpg

4am to 8am: "At 4 sighted red light on st'b'd bow..."

I'm not going to go into agonizing detail here, as maritime regulations can get pretty complex to explain (although they're fairly simple in practice, generally speaking), but I thought this warranted a little note.

Since the mid 19th century (there's a wide range of actual starting years, depending entirely on which country you're referencing) ships have been required to carry a red and green sidelights (port and starboard respectively) for the sake of both visibility and collision prevention. The longstanding automotive practice of yielding the right of way to the vehicle on the right (as well as the phrase "rules of the road") has its roots in naval maneuvering practices.

In this case, Albatross sights the red sidelight of another vessel of her starboard bow, meaning that the other vessel's port side is to her starboard, which translates to Albatross being on the other vessel's left. As such, Albatross yielded the right of way to the vessel on her right, and veered off course in order to clear the other vessel to her stern (crossing a vessel to her bow is a nearly sure-fire way to wind up with a sizeable hole in your starboard).

I mentioned the phrase "rules of the road". While most of us are familiar with the phrase as it relates to highway codes and etiquette, it has its roots in a pamphlet titled "The Rule of the Road" by Thomas Grey in 1867, predating the earliest highway codes by nearly 80 years. Yet another example of naval jargon becoming part of the modern parlance. 8)

Randi

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Re: Terms found in US log books
« Reply #25 on: September 17, 2015, 12:47:10 pm »
Green - Starboard.
Navigation lights - Port Red, Starboard Green
Imagine a line down the middle of the ship, bow to stern, and extended forwards. Anything to the left would be "Red x degrees" or to the right "Green y degrees". [Bunting Tosser / edited]
;)

I will add a link to your more detailed comments above ;D

mapurves

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Re: Terms found in US log books
« Reply #26 on: September 17, 2015, 05:39:51 pm »
Green - Starboard.
Navigation lights - Port Red, Starboard Green
Imagine a line down the middle of the ship, bow to stern, and extended forwards. Anything to the left would be "Red x degrees" or to the right "Green y degrees". [Bunting Tosser / edited]
;)

I will add a link to your more detailed comments above ;D

The mnemonic is "Port is red and there is little left."    :'(

HatterJack

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Re: Terms found in US log books
« Reply #27 on: September 18, 2015, 12:43:55 pm »
Thomas Grey's "The Rule of the Road" is:

"When all three lights I see ahead,
 I turn to Starboard and show my Red:
Green to Green, Red to Red,
 Perfect Safety -- Go Ahead.

But if to Starboard Red appear,
 It is my duty to keep clear --
 To act as judgment says is proper:
 To Port or Starboard, Back or Stop her.

And if upon my Port is seen
 A Steamer's Starboard light of Green,
 I hold my course and watch to see
 That Green to Port keeps Clear of me.

Both in safety and in doubt
 Always keep a good look out.
 In Danger, with no room to turn,
Ease her, Stop her, Go Astern."


There are a few other mnemonics regarding lights, but the odds of seeing them referenced in our logs is pretty slim.

"Red over Red, the Captain is Dead" referencing two red mast lights to show that the vessel is not under command.

"Three reds in a row, No room below" mast lights again showing that a vessel is constrained by her draft (meaning that the water beneath and to both sides prevents the vessel from altering her course).

"Red over White, Fishing at Night" pretty self-explanatory, again referencing mast lights.

"Red over Green, Sailing Machine" could be seen referencing sighting of sailing vessels at night in bad weather.

There are still more, but I wouldn't expect to see any of them referenced directly.

Randi

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Re: Terms found in US log books
« Reply #28 on: September 18, 2015, 01:09:11 pm »
Quote
When all three lights I see ahead,
What is the third?

(I already have trouble with right and left ::))

mapurves

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Re: Terms found in US log books
« Reply #29 on: September 18, 2015, 08:49:42 pm »
Often there is a white light in the centre of the ship. If you see three lights, you're heading straight for the ship in front.

With lights Left, Centre, Right
Red, White, Green: you're coming up from astern.
Green, White, Red: you're coming head on.