Author Topic: Jamestown (1879) -- Discussion: Questions and Comments  (Read 35790 times)

Craig

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Re: Jamestown (1879) -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #45 on: November 21, 2013, 10:21:56 am »
Thanks, Randi.

It seems that it was Russian Orthodox church in Alaska at that time but Greek Orthodox churches became prevalent in eastern U.S. in the last part the 19th century. Perhaps the log keeper mixed the two .

Randi

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Re: Jamestown (1879) -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #46 on: November 21, 2013, 10:41:31 am »
Just found this:
Quote
The Greek Orthodox presence in Alaska dates to the early eighteenth century when Greeks accompanied the first Russian Orthodox missionaries. However, it was not until the early 1900s that large numbers of Greeks first arrived to work on construction of the Alaska Railroad. After its completion, a small number remained in the railroad camp at the head of Cook Inlet, which became Anchorage. For many years, the nearest Orthodox parish was St. Nicholas Russian Orthodox Church in Eklutna, a village 35 miles north of Anchorage.
http://transfiguration.ak.goarch.org/
... and other stuff that confused me thoroughly!
The time period seems to be a factor.

Craig

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Re: Jamestown (1879) -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #47 on: November 21, 2013, 11:09:06 am »
It's nice to see that they got along together.

Randi

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Re: Jamestown (1879) -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #48 on: November 21, 2013, 06:53:37 pm »
The log keeper has begun to record on a consistent basis the temperature on shore in the column with heading "State of the Sea".

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ow3/final/USS%20Jamestown/vol042of040/vol042of067_061_0.jpg

Is the science team interested in this?

From Philip:
I'm always tempted by such things but I don't see any easy way to use it - we don't know how the observation was made or exactly where (height, distance from the shore)
They'd be nice to have as events, but we shouldn't require them.

I am distinctly curious about why they were making such measurements - what were they trying to find out?

Janet Jaguar

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Re: Jamestown (1879) -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #49 on: November 21, 2013, 07:22:24 pm »
My guess, whether staying on board was any better at all than holing up in a cabin on shore.  When winter weather drops below 0oF (-18oC), they may have had to prove to the crew or themselves that the ship was actually warmer (or at least less frigid.)  But that's just the way my mind works when I want to distract myself from feeling miserably cold.

Craig

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Re: Jamestown (1879) -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #50 on: November 21, 2013, 08:38:07 pm »
Here's the only comment I saw:

01 Jan, 1880

Quote
The temperature on shore from 1st inst to ~  marked with * are taken from record kept by Mr Anslim

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ow3/final/USS%20Jamestown/vol042of040/vol042of067_062_0.jpg

Curiously, the temp noted beside 9 AM doesn't correspond to that in the last column on the right.

They stopped recording wet bulb when it got too cold. Then they began recording surface water temperature  but only 4 to 6 times a day. It's as though they wanted to compensate for the loss of the wet bulb data. Related to Janet's speculation, they have not recorded any coal received or consumed since about September or so and they have been in Sitka for a long time before that.

I wasn't eager to record the shore data unless I could fit them into the weather observation tab. (Here's where vertical filling would be handy - just mentioning  ;D ::) )

Craig

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Re: Jamestown (1879) -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #51 on: November 21, 2013, 09:09:39 pm »
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Compared the shore and ship's thermometer & found that shore thermometer has the permanent error of minus one degree by the ship's thermometer for the range of temperature observed   11 degrees F to 21 degrees F.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ow3/final/USS%20Jamestown/vol042of040/vol042of067_074_1.jpg


Randi

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Re: Jamestown (1879) -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #52 on: November 21, 2013, 09:15:22 pm »
Or is it that the ship thermometer has the permanent error of plus one degree by the shore's thermometer? ;D

Craig

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Re: Jamestown (1879) -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #53 on: November 21, 2013, 09:38:47 pm »
Perhaps they had already verified the ship's thermometer before they began the voyage. I would like to think so  ;D 


Craig

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Re: Jamestown (1879) -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #54 on: November 22, 2013, 01:02:11 pm »
26/01/1880

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Gunner C. Stuart, USN with D. Sokoloff (sea) left the ship having in charge 50 Remington Rifles, 1 Gatling Gun, and appliances and 2000 rounds rifle ammunition to be delivered to the Committee of Safety at Wrangle for protection against Indians.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ow3/final/USS%20Jamestown/vol042of040/vol042of067_083_1.jpg

Randi

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Re: Jamestown (1879) -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #55 on: November 24, 2013, 10:50:29 pm »
gastcra (Craig) passes the 5000 mark!

Craig

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Re: Jamestown (1879) -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #56 on: November 26, 2013, 02:03:35 pm »
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Commander Beardslee by means of the Indian policeman, caused to be released an Indian boy who had been found and confind in the Indian vauche for exercising witchcraft, and had an interview with the Shaaman or Indian doctor at the Custom House and forced him to return ten blankets to a sick man from whom he had received them as a fee for designating the witch.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ow3/final/USS%20Jamestown/vol042of040/vol042of067_136_1.jpg
« Last Edit: November 26, 2013, 03:01:40 pm by Craig »

camiller

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Re: Jamestown (1879) -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #57 on: November 26, 2013, 02:21:04 pm »
Wow. Thanks for posting.

Craig

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Re: Jamestown (1879) -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #58 on: November 26, 2013, 03:07:19 pm »
I don't generally record remarks about people, Carolyn, but I am intrigued by the relationship between the navy and the natives. John Muir (founder of the Sierra Club) provides a lot of this type of information in his book,  The Cruise of the Corwin. The Corwin was one of the first US ships I transcribed.

camiller

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Re: Jamestown (1879) -- Discussion: Questions and Comments
« Reply #59 on: November 27, 2013, 02:29:10 am »
I've only transcribed a few ships, some of them from the WW1 logs, and haven't seen one yet that describes such interactions between a ship's crew and the local inhabitants.  Was Muir aboard the Corwin in the logs you transcribed?  That must have been cool.

I started transcribing for the weather, but really got hooked on the action in the remarks, especially with those WW1 ships. I record names and lots of other remarks in hopes that it will make it easier for someone to find the information if they're searching for it.   No threat to your captaincy ;)