Author Topic: German Weather Buoy  (Read 8435 times)

Jerry Mason

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 7
    • Yahoo Instant Messenger - s3bpilot
    • View Profile
German Weather Buoy
« on: September 03, 2013, 07:27:24 pm »
Hello all, I have just finished translating a Kriegstagebuch (war diary) of U-508 for the boat's first patrol.  The boat deployed two weather buoys off England before crossing the Atlantic for the rest of its patrol.  The boat also carried a meteorologist to supervise the deployment.  This man was later transferred to a U-boat tanker to find his way home.  He was referred to in messages as "wetterfrosch" literally "weather frog" which was confusing to me until a German friend pointed out that a meteorologist was sometimes called this because it was thought that frogs could predict the weather.  The buoys were about the size of a torpedo, 50 cm in diameter and 7 meters long, and transmitted barometric pressure and temperature 5 times a day by Morse code.  The deployment took place on 4 and 6 July 1942 on pages 7 and 8 of the diary.  This link talks about the buoys and has a photo of one being loaded onto a U-boat

Randi

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12985
    • View Profile
Re: German Weather Buoy
« Reply #1 on: September 03, 2013, 07:31:11 pm »
Thank you!

Clewi

  • Editor
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 161
    • View Profile
Re: German Weather Buoy
« Reply #2 on: September 03, 2013, 09:08:45 pm »
Just when you think that you know a thing or two about German submarines, something like this comes along!  ;) ;D That's very intersting (and new to me), thanks for sharing!

mapurves

  • Shipherd
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1772
    • View Profile
Re: German Weather Buoy
« Reply #3 on: September 03, 2013, 10:24:22 pm »
I remember reading about a German automatic weather station, or maybe two of them, installed on the coast of Labrador during the Second World War. German meteorologists were quite hampered in their long range weather forecasting because, unlike the allies, they got very little weather data from North America or the North Atlantic.

Michael

AvastMH

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7157
    • View Profile
Re: German Weather Buoy
« Reply #4 on: September 03, 2013, 11:31:28 pm »
That's really interesting - I never thought about how the Germans would have managed to deal with the problem of oncoming weather.
Thanks Jerry

Clewi

  • Editor
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 161
    • View Profile
Re: German Weather Buoy
« Reply #5 on: September 03, 2013, 11:44:12 pm »
That's really interesting - I never thought about how the Germans would have managed to deal with the problem of oncoming weather.
Thanks Jerry

Fancy gadgets like those buoys aside, their main source were the u-boats themselves as well as naval patrol aircraft and to a limited degree surface units.

JamesAPrattIII

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 333
    • View Profile
Re: German Weather Buoy
« Reply #6 on: September 14, 2013, 01:02:16 am »
On the U-boat that landed an automatic weather station on the Labrador coast. From what I understand it soon broke down. While some locals found it a few years later they thought it belonged to the Canadian government because the Germans marked it as so. It took several years for the Canadians to realize what it was and it is now in a Canadian museum. I will have to do some more research to identify the U-boat ect.

SebastianHelm

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 35
    • View Profile
Re: German Weather Buoy
« Reply #7 on: September 14, 2013, 07:07:53 am »
The weather frog is still a very common clich? in Germany; so much so that I'm amazed that it seems to be unknown elsewhere. It stems from the observation that frogs climb up branches during good weather - simply because then the insects fly higher. People used to put frogs in jars with little ladders to forecast the weather.
« Last Edit: September 14, 2013, 07:11:45 am by SebastianHelm »

Janet Jaguar

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10205
  • Smell the sea, feel the sky, & fly into the mystic
    • View Profile
Re: German Weather Buoy
« Reply #8 on: September 14, 2013, 07:10:07 am »
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Die_Gartenlaube_%281887%29_b_385.jpg
The weather frog is still a very common clich? in Germany; so much so that I'm amazed that it seems to be unknown elsewhere. It stems from the observation that frogs climb up branches during good weather -- simply because then the insects fly higher. People used to put frogs in jars with little ladders to forecast the weather.

I changed your "img" codes to "url" because that is the whole reference page.  Here is the picture-only url.  (That is a lovely, interesting gardener.  :) )

« Last Edit: September 14, 2013, 07:13:47 am by Janet Jaguar »

JamesAPrattIII

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 333
    • View Profile
Re: German Weather Buoy
« Reply #9 on: September 24, 2013, 12:43:04 am »
The U-boat in question was the U-537 which set up the MFL-26 automatic weather station named kurt on 22 -23 October 1943 in Labrador. This was the only armed German landing party to land on the coast of north America during WW II. The weather station soon broke down. It was finally located in 1981 and is now on display in the Canadian war museum. Note the U-537 is of the same type as the U-505 which is on display in Chicago.

JamesAPrattIII

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 333
    • View Profile
Re: German Weather Buoy
« Reply #10 on: September 30, 2013, 11:47:28 pm »
In searching through the axis history forum I found some information on german weather operations in the far north during WW II. They operated a number of trawlers as weather ships during the war. The USCG Bear was involved in the hunt for one of them. They also set up a number of other automatic weather devises MFL-26 in Greenland and Spitsbergen. As well as a few manned weather stations. One group in Spitsbergen landed there in 1944 was not taken POW by the allies until 4 September 1945. I hope this is of interest.

Janet Jaguar

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10205
  • Smell the sea, feel the sky, & fly into the mystic
    • View Profile
Re: German Weather Buoy
« Reply #11 on: September 30, 2013, 11:55:53 pm »
Maybe we'll see some of that then, when all the Bear's logs come in.  :)

JamesAPrattIII

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 333
    • View Profile
Re: German Weather Buoy
« Reply #12 on: October 10, 2013, 11:45:37 pm »
Besides the book Wekusta: Luftwaffe meteorological reconnaissance units by john a Kingston and Franz Selinger. The sit 12O'clockhigh.net has a number of posts of them in action sometimes getting shot down. Just thought you would like to know.

JamesAPrattIII

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 333
    • View Profile
Re: German Weather Buoy
« Reply #13 on: November 20, 2013, 02:14:10 am »
I just managed to get the book"Wekusa: Luftwaffe metrological reconassiance units and operations 1938-1945" A most interesting bookit does have some weather reports from the WW II period I am thinking of posting them on this post here if the FM would be interested. Note I got the book by interlibrary loan so I can't have it for long.

JamesAPrattIII

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 333
    • View Profile
Re: German Weather Buoy
« Reply #14 on: December 11, 2013, 08:57:31 pm »
Weather reports from the above book:
Flight report of He 111H-6 D7+DN, Wekusta 5, Banak, 15 june 1943
Takeoff: 0305 hr Landing 1328hr
route: Banak, Bear Island South cape (Spitzenberg), Ice-Fjord and north along the west coast to northernmost position 81'N, 20'E, turning south through Hinlopen(Spitzenberg) Straits, Edgeoya, Hope Island, Banak
To 72'N, 10/10 St with rain between 300m (1000 ft) and 1,000m (3,300 ft) ft to north cape at higher altitude, 4/10 thin Sc changing to 8/10 Ac to 74'N, 10/10 Sc upwards from 200 m (650 ft), rain and snow showers.
From 74' N to South cape, deep sliding-up front with rain and snow, QBB (cloud base) 50m (160 ft) then to 78'N 0 to 4/10 Sc QBB 300 to 800 (1000 to 2,700 ft, QBJ (cloud top) 1400 m (4700 ft)
Proceeding to 80' N 10'E to 81'20'E to 79'30" N 20'E only 2 to-/10 Ci Cs lent. To west and north of route clear sky. Then increasing Sc, 4 to 10/10 at 100 m to 400 m(300 to 1300 ft) above 77'N 25'E Ci Cs. from there to 74'N 23'E 10/10 Ns from 50 m (170 ft ) upwards with rain and snow.
Proceeding to coastal waters 10/10 Sc, QBB 200 to 400m (700 to 1300 ft) with showers. (to be continued)