Author Topic: German Weather Buoy  (Read 8434 times)

JamesAPrattIII

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Re: German Weather Buoy
« Reply #15 on: December 11, 2013, 09:56:01 pm »
part 2:
Visibilty outside showers 20 km to 100 km (12 to 65 m) under upliding layer 1 to 2 km (1100 to 2200 yds) wind 360' from South cape 40' wind strength 6 yo 7 veering to 120' strength 4
Off hope Island: 40' strength 6, veering 160', strength 4 to 1.
OBS 9at zero level):
Time     position           pressure       wind        vis           temp           cloud amount
0415     27'E 1325        1011mb       360'/3     20km        -1'C              10/10
0540     17'E 9545         1003mb      40'/6       3km           -3'C             10/10
0635     17'E 6735        1012mb        40'/7      20km          n/a              10/10
0745      17'E1925         1016mb      120'/4     100km        n/1               4/10
0925     18'E 8045         1020mb      120'/3      100km       -4'C              1/10
1055     27'E 4775         1010mb       40'/6      3km            -5'C             10/10

Sc stratocumulus
Ac Altostratus
Ci Cirrus
Cs cirroststatus
the positions are based on the Luftwaffe grid system
The cruising speed of an He 111 is 224 mph at 16,500 feet this plane was most likely flying at an lower altitude and may have been flying a little slower.

Janet Jaguar

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Re: German Weather Buoy
« Reply #16 on: December 11, 2013, 10:23:42 pm »
They really put a lot of effort into various ways to do nothing but weather collecting.

JamesAPrattIII

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Re: German Weather Buoy
« Reply #17 on: December 11, 2013, 10:53:46 pm »
In away they had no choice weather effected operations greatly during WW I and II

The aircraft carrier HMS Ark Royal 0825 26 may 1941 position 48'26" N 10'13"W sky overcast wind 320' force 7 visibility 16 km (10m ) and sea rough Swordfish take off to find the german battleship Bismark over the target area the weather was very bad with thick clouds, base 200 m (700ft) a strong northwesterly wind and poor visibility.

JamesAPrattIII

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Re: German Weather Buoy
« Reply #18 on: December 12, 2013, 08:12:48 pm »
This is the weather during the German channel dash operation Cerberus (part 1)

forecast for 12 Feb 1942: "A low preasure disturbance has formed in the region south of Iceland. Strong winds and falling pressure in the area north of Scotland suggest that in all probability this depression will move south with a speed of 50km/hr and on 12 February between 0800 and 1000 hr will lie in the region of the eastern exit from the channel and then move farther south."

Actual weather: With a ridge of high pressure extending southeast over the bay of Biscay from an anticyclone west of Ireland the operation began in clear conditions with light winds and good visibilty

JamesAPrattIII

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Re: German Weather Buoy
« Reply #19 on: December 12, 2013, 09:04:22 pm »
part 2 from a logbook from the German battlecrussier Scharnhorst;

11-12 February 1942
2245hr: operation begins: N 1-2, clear sky, visability very good 15 n mi;
0003 hr: very dark night slight mist but stars clearly visable
0013 hr: fleet rounding Ile D'ouessant (Ushant Island) overcast with cloud base 500 m (1600 ft) visibility relatively good:
0400 hr: very dark night SSW 3 cloudy +4'C swell 2:
0800 hr: SW 3 increasing cloudy sky almost covered +3.8'C swell 2;
0830 hr: sky completely cloudy good visibility
1100 hr Cirrus replaced by Altostratus visibility good but decreased to 8 n mi;
1130 hr 10/10 Altostratus with 3/10 Stratus base 1000 m (3300 ft) visibility moderate 6 n mi
1140 hr SW 4-5 10/10 Altostratus with 6/10 Stratus base 600 m (2000 ft) visibility moderate 5 n mi
1245 hr SW 5 light snow 10/10 Stratus base 600 m (2000 ft) 3/10 Stratus base 400 m (1300 ft ) visibility moderate 4 n mi state of sea increasing
1300 hr as 1245 hr

JamesAPrattIII

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Re: German Weather Buoy
« Reply #20 on: December 12, 2013, 10:20:49 pm »
part 2:
1350 hr: SE 5 10/10 Stratus base 1000m (3300 ft) 3/10 Stratus base 600m (2000 ft) visibility moderate 6 n mi
1450 hr: SW 5-6 10/10 Stratus base 600 m (2000 ft) 5/10 Stratus base 400 m 1300 ft) light rain visibility moderate 5 n mi;
1529 hr further deteriorating weather cloud base 150-200 m (500-700 ft) continuous rain visibility very poor 1-2 km 1100-2200 yd);
1600 hr  local improvements in weather visibility moderate 4 n mi
1800 hr SW 6 visibility decreased to 3 n mi
2200 hr WNW 6-8 (passage of cold front) visibility decrased to fog limits 500m (550 yds) in snow and hail showers in the rear of depression; the poor conditions hampered the passage of ships into german ports.

JamesAPrattIII

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Re: German Weather Buoy
« Reply #21 on: December 13, 2013, 08:36:32 pm »
part 4
It was critical for this operation that the Luftwaffe have fairly clear weather over France and Belgium as well as the channel or it fighters would not be able to operate. The German navy needed good visibility and no more than slight speed so it could go at maximum speed.

From Blechley park a decoded german weather message:

25 July 1940 position 54'N 8'E tim3 0345
present weather: x visibility 20 km haze from the surface to 2500m thin patches (?) of high fog near surface (low St) 6/10 thick as heavy icing between 3000 and 4000 m 8/10 above 5000 m Cs with sun visible 9/10

JamesAPrattIII

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Re: German Weather Buoy
« Reply #22 on: December 21, 2013, 12:36:08 am »
Some weather related books this book used as sources:
War North of 80: The last german Artic Weather station of WW II W Dege and W Baal
Weather and War T.A. Fitzpatrick
Weather of the 1780s over Europe j Kinston
Even the birds were walking J.A Kingston and P.G. Rackliff
British isles weather types and a rgister of the daily sequence of circulation patterns 1861-1971 H.H. lamb
Climate: Present past and future H.H. lamb
Historic Storms on the North sea British isles and North west Europe H.H. lamb

I also have some errata on this book on the fate of one aircraft of Wekusta 26
Ju-88D 5M+G W.nr 430321 lost in the western Mediterranean 28 nov 1942 Cpt H. Cleve and crew killed. The book Seafire: the Spitfire the Seafire that went to see has S/Lt D. Platt of 801 Sqn off the carrier HMS Furious shooting down a Ju 88 in flames before he was shot down and killed by the planes return fire. This looks like his victim.

JamesAPrattIII

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Re: German Weather Buoy
« Reply #23 on: June 13, 2014, 07:24:21 pm »
In the book "Even the Birds Were Walking" that deals with RAF weather operations it has a weather map of the UK area on 19 jan 1945. It also has the first aerial weather observation in history 30 November 1784 in a balloon flight from London to Dartford that lasted 1 1/2 hours by John Jefferies and jean-pierre Blanchard 51 degree surface and 29 degrees at 9000 ft.

There is also a book that just came out Forecast for D-Day John Ross on the D-Day weather forcast

camiller

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Re: German Weather Buoy
« Reply #24 on: June 16, 2014, 02:38:18 pm »
 8)

JamesAPrattIII

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Re: German Weather Buoy
« Reply #25 on: October 22, 2014, 12:49:04 am »
I finished reading "War North of 80" about the Last German artic weather station of WW II. It does contain a chart of the average daily tempetures of there. It also has some information of the other German weather stations in the artic during WW II, automatic weather stations and weather buoys. It is rather interesting book.

another book that I have not been able to read is "Black Night for Bomber Command" Roch Knott on what happens when the meteorolgists get the weather wrong and it resulted in heavy losses for bomber command do to weather during the night of 16/17 December 1943
I also recently finished the book "The Bomber Command"  by Alister Revie which has a more than usual account of how weather effected operations.

This is from WW I but it does involve one of the more critical forecasts of the war. At approx. 1100 20 march 1918 german Meteorologist Lt Dr Schmas reported to General Erich Lundendorf according to Lundendorf  the weather "It was not strictly favorable but it did indicate the attack was possible." At 1200 hours Lundendorf gave the orders and at 0400 21 march 1918 Operation Michael, the first of the great 1918 german offensives that was supposed to win the war for Germany began. It is sometime refered to as the Kaiserschlacht (the Emporers Battle)

JamesAPrattIII

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Re: German Weather Buoy
« Reply #26 on: February 28, 2015, 09:04:55 pm »
I have some weather conditions experiences by German Zeppelins on raids on England:

19/20 Jan 1915 the first zeppelin raid North sea moderate SW winds clear frosty then mist over the north sea. over England rain and snow foul and dark.

12 May 1915 Zeppelin L5 2100 reports 23 F 4800ft

15/16 June 1915 over England clear and moonless

9/10 Aug 1915 over England fog and mist, rain squals

11/12 Sept 1915 fog

12/13 Sept 1915 thick ground fog over England

13/14 Sept 1915 squalls and thunderstorms over England

13/14 Oct 1915 Light winds mainly from the south, mist over east coast and over Kent fog over the North sea

31 Jan/1 Feb 1916 fog over the North sea, patches of fog and mist on east coast clear sky midland counties

5/5 mar 1916 over England NW to N winds 50-55 mph snow and hail

2/3 may 1916 over England and north sea rain hail snow heavy clouds fog

2/3 Sep 1916 strong winds SW to WSW rain and snow at higher altitude

I hope this of some use. I may have more