Author Topic: Where did you learn about Old Weather?  (Read 13492 times)

mapurves

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Re: Where did you learn about Old Weather?
« Reply #45 on: March 19, 2015, 10:14:16 pm »
We are curious to know how people learned about the Old Weather project.

If you are willing, please tell us here.

Thanks!
I was a professional meteorologist with Environment Canada for 28 years, until they shut down our weather centre in 1998. I worked part time as a meteorologist for the Yukon Forest Service for another 12 years after that. Shortly after OW started, but I don't remember exactly when, one of the people who had worked with me in the weather centre told me about Old Weather. It caught my fancy, and I signed up. My first ship was HMS Grafton, oh ye of perpetually horrible handwriting. When I signed up, she was patrolling the Red Sea in 1915. After that it was in the Med. supporting the landing, battles and evacuation at Galipoli. I found it addictive, especially seeing the battles around Galipoli from a shipboard view, as it were. After that, a British Gunboat, starting with "M" (name forgotton), on the Yangste River in the 1930s. We were getting ready to move south at the time, so OW took a back seat to packing up and selling a house. However, I had absolutely no idea that navies from all over the world were steaming up and down the Yangtse and other Chinese rivers back in the 30s! Then on to the Grafton.

I see the value in entering the weather data, and I enjoy the historical aspect of the Events pages; the combination of the two make the project terribly addictive.

Danny252

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Re: Where did you learn about Old Weather?
« Reply #46 on: March 20, 2015, 12:28:53 am »
(Apparently marine biologists forget to give the lat/long information connected to their sample collections. ;) )

Eh? The biologists' logs give the ship's location in far more detail than the logs we're transcribing do!

Janet Jaguar

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Re: Where did you learn about Old Weather?
« Reply #47 on: March 20, 2015, 12:43:54 am »
Well that's good to know, Danny.  Do you have online links so we can see some of them?

Danny252

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Re: Where did you learn about Old Weather?
« Reply #48 on: March 20, 2015, 02:33:13 pm »
They should be mentioned in various places in the Albatross thread, where I've used them to source information (the voyage maps should reference them, at the very least).

As far as I know, all records of dredging were published in the Fisheries Commission's annual reports, which are available from the NOAA: http://www.lib.noaa.gov/collections/imgdocmaps/fish_com_annualreport.html

The listings I'm aware of are:

Report 1900 - Compilation of Records from 1883 to 1900
Report 1902 - Records for 1901 and 1902
Report 1903 - Records for 1903
Report 1905 - Records for 1904 and 1905
Report 1906 - Records for 1906
Report 1910 - Records for 1907 to 1910
Report 1920 - Records for 1911 to 1920

Actual research is likely to have been published in the Bulletin of the USFC, also available from the NOAA: http://www.lib.noaa.gov/collections/imgdocmaps/fish_com_bulletins.html

I've also come across notebooks written during the surveys available on the internet - I seem to recall they're available from the Smithsonian or similar.
« Last Edit: March 20, 2015, 02:36:26 pm by Danny252 »

Janet Jaguar

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Re: Where did you learn about Old Weather?
« Reply #49 on: March 20, 2015, 06:49:20 pm »
Those department reports are online for most departments, altho not the most current ones.  And very interesting and informative they can be.  But I was wondering about the actual field logbooks filled out by the scientists in sync with the ship's logbook.  Our logs tell us they dredged this afternoon,  the field logbooks would tell us what specimens they pulled up. 



Found them - the scan date on some is December 2014 so I may have simply looked too soon.  Some Biodiversity Library did the scanning apparently, but they are still copyright-free gov't docs. 
http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/search?searchTerm=albatross+field+notes#/titles index.

The 1899-1900 great circle journey is at here plus others (3 month books)
http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/176710#page/1/
They don't list the specimens here at all, but they do list deep ocean temperatures and some of those may interest Philip.  I don't think any other ship in our fleet is taking the bottom ocean temperature in the Mariana Trench.  (Of course, all the temps are handwritten and no one has yet transcribed them.)  :)
« Last Edit: March 20, 2015, 06:54:41 pm by Janet Jaguar »

Danny252

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Re: Where did you learn about Old Weather?
« Reply #50 on: March 23, 2015, 08:31:10 am »
How are the specimens labeled? The dredging sites were all given a DR.xxxx identifier, and if those are still on the specimens, matching them would be much easier. If it was only a date, it would still be useful. Otherwise, I suspect that matching the specimens to where they were found would be very difficult...

The PTB have previously said they aren't currently interested in the sea floor temperatures, especially as they have already been published in the dredging records, and so are actually transcribed! They occasionally turn up in the Albatross' logs.

Edit: Hopefully I'm not sounding like too much of a downer, Janet! It's actually quite nice that someone else is interested in all this stuff I've been looking at for a while :)

The notebooks you found do indeed to seem to be the ones I've found before. The reports from the Fisheries Commission are essentially typed up summaries of those, and are somewhat easier to read - though perhaps there's some information in there that wasn't copied over.
« Last Edit: March 23, 2015, 09:24:59 am by Danny252 »

philip.brohan

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Re: Where did you learn about Old Weather?
« Reply #51 on: March 23, 2015, 10:52:56 am »
Actually, the deep-ocean data people (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Ocean_Database_Project) have been at this data rescue business much longer (http://www.iode.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=18&Itemid=100087) than us surface/atmosphere people. However they do look at different documents, have quite different scientific requirements, and I don't think they have a citizen science project.

So I (and the oW science team) don't do sub-surface data, because there are already other people doing that (it's a whole seperate scientific field that I know little about) - so you don't need to transcribe any such observations you find (I don't know what to do with them, and they may already be known), but please do mention their existence in the forum, so that when the oceanographers start taking an interest we can tell them where to look.

Randi

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Re: Where did you learn about Old Weather?
« Reply #52 on: March 23, 2015, 12:20:51 pm »

Kevin

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Re: Where did you learn about Old Weather?
« Reply #53 on: March 24, 2015, 10:39:26 pm »
I have been thinking and working for quite some time on the best ways to capture and preserve all of the work that OW volunteers are accomplishing that is not part of the instrumental weather data stream. One of the very compelling things we can do is relate the transcriptions back to the original documents at the US National Archives and elsewhere, which will enable word and attribute search of the high resolution image collection, and dual display of content. In the same way we can work with multiple repositories to unite different sources of information that stems directly from the ships' logbooks, but are accessioned in different collections. For example, this field note book (https://transcription.si.edu/project/6983) was kept by William Dall, the Coast Survey officer in charge of the schooner Yukon in 1880 and transcribed by the Smithsonian; the corresponding logbook was imaged at the National Archives and transcribed by Old Weather volunteers. When we're done then, you'll be able to see everything OW has accomplished, along with related items like this, and know that it has become part of a curated digital collection that will be available for research in the future. Almost certainly research we haven't imagined. 

Janet Jaguar

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Re: Where did you learn about Old Weather?
« Reply #54 on: March 24, 2015, 10:42:15 pm »
That sounds marvelous, Kevin.  Really cool.