Author Topic: Where did you learn about Old Weather?  (Read 13490 times)

Dean

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Re: Where did you learn about Old Weather?
« Reply #30 on: February 17, 2014, 01:31:03 pm »
Welcome, Walrus!!

Another avenue for information. ..Some of us SKYPE. If 'talking' is easier than writing a million questions. Drop a posting here (WITHOUT your SKYPE address - as this is an open forum)
And we can possibly contact you for arrangements. ;D

Enjoy the trip!

KSGarvin

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Re: Where did you learn about Old Weather?
« Reply #31 on: November 25, 2014, 03:41:48 pm »
I just finished reading my souvenir book from the Royal Observatory Greenwich. I looked up the "Solar Stormwatch" mentioned in the back of the book and from there I found the Zooniverse projects and Old Weather.

I've just finished my master's degree in history earlier this year so I'm pretty keen to actually do something to contribute to historical and/or scientific projects.  :D

Janet Jaguar

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Re: Where did you learn about Old Weather?
« Reply #32 on: November 25, 2014, 04:13:11 pm »
Fabulous - then you will like the comment pages in the transcript.  :)

Randi

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Re: Where did you learn about Old Weather?
« Reply #33 on: November 25, 2014, 04:15:17 pm »
Welcome, and thanks for letting us know how you found us.

With OW you get to contribute to history and science both!

This is the main link between the two projects: Old Space Weather: sightings of aurorae and sunspots. It is something that came about purely by chance!

AvastMH

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Re: Where did you learn about Old Weather?
« Reply #34 on: November 25, 2014, 08:23:21 pm »
Hi KSGarvin,
Hope you have lots of fun on OW...sometimes you're begging for something to happen when you're stuck in port...then it all kicks off...trips round the Horn, or wondering how your ship can pay the next load of rewards for the return of your crew from the earthly delights of some town. My favourite is when the write up gets poetic when beautiful events (dramatic skies, meteor showers, aurora etc etc) happen.  Enjoy the journey!
Joan

Dean

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Re: Where did you learn about Old Weather?
« Reply #35 on: November 26, 2014, 01:13:39 pm »
Hi KSGarvin!  Welcome to our little corner of the world!

Actually we are all over the world. You can see where we are by using the map at:
https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer?ll=0.35156,-156.445312&msa=0&spn=132.034234,302.695312&mid=zaT-TbaJRxQk.k-KRsKq8dEyw

and if you send a personal message to POMMY STUART with your address (or just the City, State/Province/Region, Country) he'll add you to our map.

KSGarvin

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Re: Where did you learn about Old Weather?
« Reply #36 on: November 26, 2014, 10:05:29 pm »
Thanks everyone!

exim202

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Re: Where did you learn about Old Weather?
« Reply #37 on: January 02, 2015, 10:44:18 pm »
I got to hear about OW at a trip to the local theatre. It's a cosy little amateur theatre, and they were putting on "Darwin and Fitzroy" - about the voyage of the Beagle - Captain Fitzroy as you no doubt know was much involved with developing weather observation and forecasting in that era. And before the performance we had a fascinating presentation by one Philip Brohan. I was awestruck by the beautiful videos of world weather system circulation generated by OW data. I loved the idea of getting involved from both the science and history/human interest angles. (I read the Hornblower books avidly as a kid.) And so here I am.  :)

Just sent PM to Philip to say thanks for recruiting me that night.
And 'gnoseological concupiscence'? Just a fancy way of saying there is a lot of stuff out there we will never completely know or understand. But it's a human (and ferret!) trait to be curious, and try - a basic desire that can sometimes get us into trouble! It's a concept of Karl Rahner, a theologian I came across while doing a part-time Masters in Theology a few years ago, and the term just made me laugh.
« Last Edit: January 04, 2015, 04:47:52 pm by exim202 »

Janet Jaguar

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Re: Where did you learn about Old Weather?
« Reply #38 on: January 03, 2015, 12:29:54 am »
What a splendid experience!!  I hope Philip sees this post and knows he had at least 1 success that night.

I too read Hornblower as a child - I was sure it was all naval battles for boys, but my father simply left a paperback on my nightstand until my curiosity made me break down and read it.  The kind of thing that teaches the romance and hard work of going to sea.  :)

Randi

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Re: Where did you learn about Old Weather?
« Reply #39 on: January 03, 2015, 07:46:38 am »
I read Hornblower as a kid too! I don't know what started me on them; my tastes were more science fiction, fantasy, and mystery.

studentforever

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Re: Where did you learn about Old Weather?
« Reply #40 on: January 03, 2015, 08:37:26 am »
I read Hornblower and Biggles (pilot), I dipped into the Alexander Kent series but they didn't grip me in the same way. I wonder what their authors would think about some of the outcomes of reading their books.

philip.brohan

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Re: Where did you learn about Old Weather?
« Reply #41 on: January 05, 2015, 11:33:38 am »
I enjoyed giving that talk in the Prospect Theatre - though I was a little worried about falling off the stage (I'm not used to footlights and had not expected how little you can see when on stage in a theatre).

I think oldWeather owes quite a bit to Horatio Hornblower (If you enjoyed the novels, you might also like Parkinson's biography http://www.amazon.co.uk/The-Life-Times-Horatio-Hornblower/dp/0750921099). He gave many of us an affection for stories from square-riggers.

More recently I've also enjoyed Jack Aubrey and Stephen Maturin - for some reason I never took to Richard Bolitho. Any other recommendations?



exim202

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Re: Where did you learn about Old Weather?
« Reply #42 on: January 12, 2015, 01:01:43 pm »
For people who like Hornblower, a couple more of CS Forester's naval books:
"The Captain from Connecticut" - American vessel engaged with the British after US Independence
"The Ship" - WWII British ship on Malta convoy.
and a list of his books at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CS_Forester

Jack Tuberville

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Re: Where did you learn about Old Weather?
« Reply #43 on: March 19, 2015, 09:38:51 pm »
I was looking around for something for my grandson to get involved with. He likes science.
Saw a film on Monarch migrations, searched on that. Found Zooniverse, then you guys. Thought it was something I might like, as I am a retired biologist with an interest in history.

Janet Jaguar

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Re: Where did you learn about Old Weather?
« Reply #44 on: March 19, 2015, 09:48:55 pm »
We are glad to have you, Jack.  Our Albatross is the very first science ship built entirely for the US Fish Commission to study marine life, and her logs are written more clearly than most.  I know the Smithsonian still has all her field notes logbooks from the scientists on board as well as many of her specimens and are anxious to link our ship logs with the weather and location information to them.  (Apparently marine biologists forget to give the lat/long information connected to their sample collections. ;) )

Also, please feel free to ask questions.  We are a friendly group.