Author Topic: Interesting data found but not transcribed (meteorological, oceanographic, etc.)  (Read 6598 times)

Randi

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Many logs have a variety of additional data that we are not currently using, and the question of how to handle them has come up several times.

We have checked with Philip and Kevin.

The response is: "The difficulty with data like this is that we can't promise to use it - it's tempting, it's interesting, but we don't KNOW that it will be used in science - there's a risk that transcribing it will be a waste of someone's time."

HOWEVER, they have also suggested creating a topic (this one): "... wherein a brief note about what it is and where it can be found could be posted. Since the US logs will be available in perpetuity on the National Archives website it would be easy enough for someone to go back for it later. We should then put a notice in the edited/finished document for the ship of what was seen."



Please continue to note:
Sunspots, aurorae, erratic compass bearings and unusual radio reception in Old Space Weather: sightings of aurorae and sunspots
and
Volcanic activity in Natural Phenomena

Randi

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Jamestown (1879)

Jan 1880 - Sitka, Alaska
(not currently sure about earlier and later logs)

Temperature on Shore is entered in the State of the Sea column.
e.g., http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ow3/final/USS%20Jamestown/vol042of040/vol042of067_072_0.jpg

Events page includes description of weather, surf, tide, and water temperature.
e.g., http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ow3/final/USS%20Jamestown/vol042of040/vol042of067_072_1.jpg

camiller

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This is GREAT topic to add, Randi!  Elsewhere in the forum it's mentioned that serious researchers who would use this 'extra' data would want to transcribe it from the logs themselves anyway.   How will this forum topic be linked to the ships so that researchers know it's there?

Albatross 1884 in the Caribbean Sea:
On the remarks pages, the log records sounding depths and types of bottom sediments.  The log also records the timing of deployment of other scientific gear and movements on and off shore of scientific parties, but not the resultant data.   The log provides the schedule for everything that was happening on the ship, which is interesting itself, and also sometimes explains the timing and location of a scientific observation, or lack thereof.

Craig

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In the Jeannette logs the water density was recorded for a while (at the surface, 6 fathoms and 20 fathoms if I remember correctly). I transcribed this in the Events tab but perhaps not from when they started to appear..

Clewi

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In the Jeannette logs the water density was recorded for a while (at the surface, 6 fathoms and 20 fathoms if I remember correctly). I transcribed this in the Events tab but perhaps not from when they started to appear..

And the reason for this is also interesting, although it isn't mentioned in the logbook IIRC, but in one of the accounts, I think Melville. And that's the problem: I've got tons of bonus material that I could add either as footnotes, crossreferences or a seperate document, but I don't know how to do it, especially as I don't have the transcribed log. Not sure what happened to it. It didn't show up again since the transcript was finished.

I think the Jeannette expedition is by far the best documented one so far (first hand accounts, that is!). It'd be a shame not to use it!

mapurves

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Concord has been recording depth soundings and type of bottom at times during their voyages, currents and depth of water at anchorage etc. The latter especially at anchorage in the Min River near Fuzhou. It seemed to me that the depth soundings and type of bottom during transit might have been some kind of survey because there would be lots of soundings for a day or two when in transit around Korea or China, and then nothing for days. Usually, when they anchor, they record the bottom type and depth. They also record, every day when in port, how much food and what type they are buying for the crew; things like, "114 lbs of bread 128 1/2 lbs of fresh beef and vegetables". Not very interesting to me, but maybe to a dietician or someone else in the health sciences.

Hanibal94

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The Pioneer has been recording the surface temperature (in Celsius!) while at sea. I have been transcribing this as "Event: Other".

So, for the page http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ow3/final/USCS%20Pioneer/Book%2046%20-%20July-September,%201933/IMG_0326_0.jpg

I did it like this:

Quote
Surf. Temp.: 14.2 C at 35 08 N, 121 07 W

Janet Jaguar

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That looks perfect, Hanibal.

asterix135

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Doesn't surface temperature go in the water temerature column?

If not, I have lots of horrible entries on the Patterson.

Janet Jaguar

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Actually, both methods look right to me.  Because the surface temperature comes attached to a lat/long location.  But it is also on a time line.  Which means I need to ask Philip.  I'll get back to you both.
« Last Edit: February 12, 2014, 09:41:44 pm by Janet Jaguar »

Randi

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Patterson, at least here, http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ow3/final/USCS%20Patterson/Book%201/IMG_4949_0.jpg,
has the water temperature in the water temperature column, so that is how it should be transcribed.

When "surface temperature" is written beside the weather data table and the water temperature column is left blank, it is less obvious how to handle it.



I see that Janet is taking care of it ;)

mapurves

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Concord, deviation of the compass.

Janet Jaguar

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The Pioneer has been recording the surface temperature (in Celsius!) while at sea. I have been transcribing this as "Event: Other".

So, for the page http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ow3/final/USCS%20Pioneer/Book%2046%20-%20July-September,%201933/IMG_0326_0.jpg

I did it like this:

Quote
Surf. Temp.: 14.2 C at 35 08 N, 121 07 W
Doesn't surface temperature go in the water temerature column?

If not, I have lots of horrible entries on the Patterson.


Well, I asked Philip "Pioneer is providing daily surface temps attached to a lat/long location.  Hanibal is recording the whole statement as an event.  Asterix is putting in the water temp field in the weather readings. Which is right, or do both work?  Help - my instinct says they are both doing something that works."  And got this answer.  Neither of you are to change anything.  :)

Blowed if I know - Asterix's method has the advantage that the obs will be routinely extracted (no special case required), Hanibal's method has the advantage that it marks the ob as possibly something other than the bog-standard sea-temperature.

Generally if two experienced transcribers are doing something different it's because there's neither approach is obviously better than the other, and that's true here. They are both doing a good job and might as well each carry on as they are doing.
« Last Edit: February 13, 2014, 12:28:27 pm by Janet Jaguar »

asterix135

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aye aye cap'n.  Will carry on

thanks!

camiller

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Mapurves, thanks for pointing out some other "data" that I have been taking for granted that might be interesting to social scientists.

The Jamestown 1844 also has a daily list of the type and amount of foods used that day and the remaining "on hand".  In the remarks they record everything received on the ship - water, food, supplies, lumber, etc.   And there is a daily "sick report".

Now, if only they had recorded air pressure that often!