Author Topic: Interesting data found but not transcribed (meteorological, oceanographic, etc.)  (Read 5644 times)

Kathy

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Just wanted to mention that the Vicksburg includes a narrative description of the weather for each watch on the Events of the Day page.

Janet Jaguar

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Just wanted to mention that the Vicksburg includes a narrative description of the weather for each watch on the Events of the Day page.

That is required comment in all US military and coast guard ships and most science vessels.  It is very common, and most mention-only transcribers skip it.

Hanibal94

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Just wanted to mention that the Vicksburg includes a narrative description of the weather for each watch on the Events of the Day page.

That is required comment in all US military and coast guard ships and most science vessels.  It is very common, and most mention-only transcribers skip it.

Seen it on the Pioneer too. I ignore it and just do the regular WR on the weather pages.

Craig

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This weather information is mostly redundant but it sometimes helps clarify the codes.

Pommy Stuart

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Randi

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Not too much you can do with it ::)
Posting it here is fine ;)

Janet Jaguar

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Those department reports are online for most departments, altho not the most current ones.  And very interesting and informative they can be.  But I was wondering about the actual field logbooks filled out by the scientists in sync with the ship's logbook.  Our logs tell us they dredged this afternoon,  the field logbooks would tell us what specimens they pulled up. 



Found them - the scan date on some is December 2014 so I may have simply looked too soon.  Some Biodiversity Library did the scanning apparently, but they are still copyright-free gov't docs. 
http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/search?searchTerm=albatross+field+notes#/titles index.

The 1899-1900 great circle journey is at here plus others (3 month books)
http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/176710#page/1/
They don't list the specimens here at all, but they do list deep ocean temperatures and some of those may interest Philip.  I don't think any other ship in our fleet is taking the bottom ocean temperature in the Mariana Trench.  (Of course, all the temps are handwritten and no one has yet transcribed them.)  :)

Randi

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Actually, the deep-ocean data people (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Ocean_Database_Project) have been at this data rescue business much longer (http://www.iode.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=18&Itemid=100087) than us surface/atmosphere people. However they do look at different documents, have quite different scientific requirements, and I don't think they have a citizen science project.

So I (and the oW science team) don't do sub-surface data, because there are already other people doing that (it's a whole seperate scientific field that I know little about) - so you don't need to transcribe any such observations you find (I don't know what to do with them, and they may already be known), but please do mention their existence in the forum, so that when the oceanographers start taking an interest we can tell them where to look.

This is the place to record them ;)

Randi

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I have been thinking and working for quite some time on the best ways to capture and preserve all of the work that OW volunteers are accomplishing that is not part of the instrumental weather data stream. One of the very compelling things we can do is relate the transcriptions back to the original documents at the US National Archives and elsewhere, which will enable word and attribute search of the high resolution image collection, and dual display of content. In the same way we can work with multiple repositories to unite different sources of information that stems directly from the ships' logbooks, but are accessioned in different collections. For example, this field note book (https://transcription.si.edu/project/6983) was kept by William Dall, the Coast Survey officer in charge of the schooner Yukon in 1880 and transcribed by the Smithsonian; the corresponding logbook was imaged at the National Archives and transcribed by Old Weather volunteers. When we're done then, you'll be able to see everything OW has accomplished, along with related items like this, and know that it has become part of a curated digital collection that will be available for research in the future. Almost certainly research we haven't imagined.

AvastMH

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Fantastic - it's great to know that our work will benefit the archives so much  :)

Hanibal94

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