Author Topic: Nautical terms - just for fun  (Read 11456 times)

Randi

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Nautical terms - just for fun
« on: March 02, 2014, 12:31:04 pm »
SKEDADDLE, To. To stray wilfully from a watering or a working party. An archaism retained by the Americans.
SAILOR'S WORD-BOOK (1867)

studentforever

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Re: Nautical terms - just for fun
« Reply #1 on: March 02, 2014, 12:35:23 pm »
Word I grew up with -my dad was in the navy in WW2

Helen J

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Re: Nautical terms - just for fun
« Reply #2 on: March 02, 2014, 12:36:59 pm »
I know it too - no idea where from.  I don't think anyone in the family had naval connections.

Hanibal94

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Re: Nautical terms - just for fun
« Reply #3 on: March 02, 2014, 12:42:08 pm »
I knew what that word means, but I didn't know it had naval origins!

One term I could not figure out when I was younger was the "poop deck".  But I know it now!

Randi

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Re: Nautical terms - just for fun
« Reply #4 on: March 02, 2014, 12:46:33 pm »
"I knew what that word means, but I didn't know it had naval origins!"

I didn't either ;D

Janet Jaguar

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Re: Nautical terms - just for fun
« Reply #5 on: March 02, 2014, 04:00:13 pm »
I most often heard it used in fun, by my grandparents generation - much too old to have started in WW2.  Most often used when we wanted attention while they were busy, or when we were judged done with our chores but in danger of being giving new ones during a busy time.  "You just skedaddle now,"  implied both permission to leave and escape from more work.  None of my grandparents were either naval or living anywhere near navy activity.

Craig

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Re: Nautical terms - just for fun
« Reply #6 on: March 02, 2014, 04:05:13 pm »
I am sure I heard if frequently in cowboy movies when I was young.

Randi

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Re: Nautical terms - just for fun
« Reply #7 on: March 07, 2014, 10:25:42 am »
Quote from: Royal Navy Diction and Slang - http://www.hmsrichmond.org/dict_a.htm
ADMIRAL
The word itself is of Arabic origin (Emir-el-Bahr means Lord of the Seas). It
came to us through the French and first appears in English records at the end of
the 13th Century. Vice-Admiral came into use with the British about 1550,
Rear-Admiral about 1600 and Admiral of the Fleet at the end of the 17th
Century, apparently first being mentioned in an Order in Council of 1693,
dealing with the pay of Flag Officers.


LORD HIGH ADMIRAL
Until 1964, when the Admiralty merged with the other Service Ministries into
the new Ministry of Defence, the last holder of this title had been King William
IV, when Duke of Clarence about 1827. Queen Elizabeth II became Lord High
Admiral when the title was revived on 1st April 1964.

Craig

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Re: Nautical terms - just for fun
« Reply #8 on: March 07, 2014, 10:38:11 am »
The French amiral is closer to the original Arabic. The English might have stuck a d into it so that it would have the connotation of admirable. Or, they were just lousy at foreign languages.

Randi

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Re: Nautical terms - just for fun
« Reply #9 on: March 08, 2014, 02:20:37 pm »
Barge in:
Rudely interrupt
A barge was a flat-bottomed boat worked in a port or on a river. They were difficult to steer and were renowned for banging into other vessels.

Hanibal94

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Re: Nautical terms - just for fun
« Reply #10 on: March 08, 2014, 04:41:49 pm »
Nice explanation! I never really thought about that before.

Randi

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Re: Nautical terms - just for fun
« Reply #11 on: March 08, 2014, 04:47:58 pm »
I hadn't either. I'm having fun with this topic. ;D

Feel free to add your own finds.

camiller

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Re: Nautical terms - just for fun
« Reply #12 on: March 08, 2014, 06:31:35 pm »
 :)

Janet Jaguar

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Re: Nautical terms - just for fun
« Reply #13 on: March 08, 2014, 06:39:17 pm »
Quote
http://www.history.navy.mil/trivia/trivia03.htm
Clean Bill of Health
This widely used term has its origins in the document issued to a ship showing that the port it sailed from suffered from no epidemic or infection at the time of departure.

and

Toe the line
The space between each pair of deck planks in a wooden ship was filled with a packing material called "oakum" and then sealed with a mixture of pitch and tar. The result, from afar, was a series of parallel lines a half-foot or so apart, running the length of the deck. Once a week, as a rule, usually on Sunday, a warship's crew was ordered to fall in at quarters - that is, each group of men into which the crew was divided would line up in formation in a given area of the deck. To insure a neat alignment of each row, the Sailors were directed to stand with their toes just touching a particular seam. Another use for these seams was punitive. The youngsters in a ship, be they ship's boys or student officers, might be required to stand with their toes just touching a designated seam for a length of time as punishment for some minor infraction of discipline, such as talking or fidgeting at the wrong time. A tough captain might require the miscreant to stand there, not talking to anyone, in fair weather or foul, for hours at a time. Hopefully, he would learn it was easier and more pleasant to conduct himself in the required manner rather than suffer the punishment. From these two uses of deck seams comes our cautionary word to obstreperous youngsters to "toe the line."

camiller

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Re: Nautical terms - just for fun
« Reply #14 on: March 08, 2014, 06:40:43 pm »
I thought "jury-rigging" refered to court-room shenanigans, but no. 

Quote
Jury rigging refers to makeshift repairs or temporary contrivances, made with only the tools and materials that happen to be on hand. Originally a nautical term, on sailing ships a jury rig is a replacement mast and yards improvised in case of damage or loss of the original mast.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jury_rig