Author Topic: Nautical terms - just for fun  (Read 11470 times)

Randi

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Re: Nautical terms - just for fun
« Reply #15 on: March 08, 2014, 06:49:28 pm »
I knew the meaning, but I didn't know the nautical origin.
In fact, I'm surprised how many everyday terms have a nautical origin. ;D

camiller

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Re: Nautical terms - just for fun
« Reply #16 on: March 08, 2014, 06:53:12 pm »
"Holy stoned the decks"

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ow3/final/USS%20Jamestown/vol002of067/vol002of067_052_0.jpg
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holystone

This is my first encounter with this term. The forum saved me lots of  :o and ??? with its previous discussion about it.

Randi

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Re: Nautical terms - just for fun
« Reply #17 on: March 08, 2014, 06:55:53 pm »
 ;D

propriome

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Re: Nautical terms - just for fun
« Reply #18 on: March 09, 2014, 12:06:21 am »
Same here a few weeks ago ;D

Caro

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Re: Nautical terms - just for fun
« Reply #19 on: March 09, 2014, 09:01:16 am »
I like that mysterious organisation, CANOE: Committee to Attribute a Nautical Origin to Everything.

Randi

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Re: Nautical terms - just for fun
« Reply #20 on: March 09, 2014, 09:04:16 am »
 ;D

camiller

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Re: Nautical terms - just for fun
« Reply #21 on: March 09, 2014, 08:52:08 pm »
 ;D

Randi

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Re: Nautical terms - just for fun
« Reply #22 on: March 15, 2014, 01:42:31 pm »
Quote from: Royal Navy Diction & Slang - http://www.hmsrichmond.org/dict_b.htm
BANYAN PARTY - An old Naval name for a picnic party.

Randi

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Re: Nautical terms - just for fun
« Reply #23 on: March 22, 2014, 07:37:37 pm »
Quote from: Royal Navy Diction & Slang - http://www.hmsrichmond.org/dict_c.htm
CHRISTMAS DAY CUSTOMS IN THE NAVY
Mastheads and yardarm tips are decorated with bunches of green foliage; this is done by the Boatswain's party in the dark hours of the night of 24/25 December. Messes and messdecks are decorated with paper streamers, foliage, etc.; a small prize may be awarded to the mess adjudged to have the best decorations. After church service, with carols, messdeck rounds start at about 11:00 AM, when the Captain and officers, and perhaps their ladies, visit each mess and exchange seasonal compliments. Up to the nineteen-twenties it was usual for samples of each mess's Christmas far to be offered to the Captain. The procession is headed by a Boy rating wearing the uniform of the Master-at-Arms, accompanied perhaps by a Bugler dressed a Colour-Sergeant and other ratings dressed as officers (this is clearly a reference to the medieval Lord of Misrule and Boy Bishops). The ship's cook and bakers work very hard and lavish meals are provided.

I'm not sure how many of these customs were still in effect during WW I.
On the Birmingham at Christmas there was the following log entry: Decorated masthead + yards with evergreens.

Randi

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Re: Nautical terms - just for fun
« Reply #24 on: May 05, 2014, 07:29:37 pm »
BESET IN ICE. Surrounded with ice, and no opening for advance or retreat, so as to be obliged to remain immovable.
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/26000/26000-h/26000-h.htm#B

Randi

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Re: Nautical terms - just for fun
« Reply #25 on: July 07, 2014, 09:57:57 pm »
Up to the present day [about 1930 ;)] we find that coins are still put in a ship - often under the step of the mast when she is built.  The present Royal Yacht is a case in point.  This custom possibly dates from the Romans, who had a habit of placing coins on the mouth of a person when being buried so that he might pay his fare to Charon when ferried across the Styx.  Coins were possibly put into ships so that in the event of sudden disaster those drowned would at least have their passages prepaid.

One hears frequent references to Davy Jones .  This really is the Duffy or ghost of Jonah,  Duffy being an old English word for ghost.

Handsomely means slowly or with caution, and Roundly as quick as possible. Both orders are in common use for hoisting boats or working Tackles.

A Donkey, being the almost universal beast of burden, the term is used to denote a Naval artisan?s tool chest, a sailmaker?s or tailor?s sewing machine, or any mechanical contrivance which saves manual labour.

Hanibal94

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Re: Nautical terms - just for fun
« Reply #26 on: July 28, 2014, 04:55:32 pm »
TROLLING. A method of fishing where one or more baited lines are drawn through the water, from behind a moving boat or by sweeping the line from side to side when stationary.

Further information: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trolling_(fishing)
« Last Edit: July 28, 2014, 07:21:11 pm by Hanibal94 »

Randi

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Re: Nautical terms - just for fun
« Reply #27 on: November 29, 2014, 12:00:33 pm »
From: http://www.hmsrichmond.org/dict_p.htm

CHURCH PENDANT
The Church Pendant - a white pendant with red St. George's cross and a red,
white and blue fly - is flown in H.M. Ships during the time that Divine
Service is being held on board. The pendant first came to be used about 1653,
at the time of the first Dutch war, and is said to have its origin in the
flag of St. George (for England) and the flag of Holland combined; the two
protestant nations would call a truce on Sunday, this special pendant being
flown to signify that the truce was in force.


PAYING-OFF PENDANT
It has long been the custom of H.M. Ships returning home to pay off after a
commission abroad to wear a paying-off pendant. It is to be noted that this
is a custom only - it is not an officially - authorised action, nor is the
pendant itself provided from official sources. Being unofficial, no
instructions about it appear in any naval regulations. The pendant is
invariably white with a red St George's cross at the hoist; at the end of the
fly a balloon or (formerly) a bladder - sometimes gilded - is often attached
to keep the fly clear of the water.


The custom is said to have originated in the XIX century, when all cleaning
rags were stitched together and hoisted as a sign that they were finished
with. Later, when "proper" paying-off pendants were made on board, it became
the custom for every member of the ship's company to put in a few stitches.
Nowadays the pendants are invariably bought ashore at the expense of the
ship's welfare fund.


As the paying-off pendant is itself unofficial, there can be no authoritative
rules about its length; the following have been cited - (a) the length of the
ship if the commission has lasted the correct length of time with additions
or abatements from that length corresponding to the difference between the
actual length of the commission and the 'normal' length of a commission; (b)
the length of the ship plus one foot for every month completed on the
station; (c) one and a third times the length of the ship; (d) one and half
times the height of the foremast. It should be borne in mind that the
commission referred to is the length of time the ship's company has been
abroad, not the ship herself: when a ship recommissions abroad a fresh
commission is started; thus a commission of longer than 2? years is
exceptional.


GIN PENDANT
A green/white/green pendant indicating an officer is entertaining the Ward
Room usually for a birthday, promotion, birth of a baby &c., &c. May also be
shown by H.M.Ship indicating hospitality for their brother officers in the
squadron/flotilla.

Kookaburra

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Re: Nautical terms - just for fun
« Reply #28 on: November 29, 2014, 03:41:52 pm »
I can see why that paying off pennant has a balloon holding it aloft if it is at least as long as the ship!

I would like to think the gin pennant has a green olive in white martini glass on a green background ;)


Helen J

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Re: Nautical terms - just for fun
« Reply #29 on: November 29, 2014, 04:57:40 pm »

I would like to think the gin pennant has a green olive in white martini glass on a green background ;)

 :D :D :D