Author Topic: Nautical terms - just for fun  (Read 9528 times)

Janet Jaguar

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10205
  • Smell the sea, feel the sky, & fly into the mystic
    • View Profile
Re: Nautical terms - just for fun
« Reply #30 on: November 29, 2014, 08:49:29 pm »
New things I'm still learning here!  Those paying-off pennants must look spectacular, I wish we could find a photo.  :)



I love google.  Here's a modern one, and it is in lots of navies.

HMS Dumbarton Castle paying off - click to see full size


The Jeanne d'Arc flying her paying-off pennant while returning to harbour.


commissioning pennants for the United States Navy & United States Coast Guard
« Last Edit: November 29, 2014, 08:57:55 pm by Janet Jaguar »

Kookaburra

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 248
  • Not all who wander are lost.
    • View Profile
Re: Nautical terms - just for fun
« Reply #31 on: November 29, 2014, 08:59:12 pm »
Oh they look very festive!

Randi

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12822
    • View Profile
Re: Nautical terms - just for fun
« Reply #32 on: November 29, 2014, 10:49:09 pm »
 8)



A Gin Pennant means that the wardroom is inviting officers from ships in company to drinks. The origins of the Gin Pennant are uncertain, but it seems to have been used since the 1940s and probably earlier. Originally it was a small green triangular pennant measuring approximately 18 by 9 inches (460 by 230 mm), defaced with a white wine glass, nowadays the gin pennant is a Starboard pennant defaced with a wine or cocktail glass. Its colour, size and position when hoisted were all significant as the aim was for the pennant to be as inconspicuous as possible, thereby having fewer ships sight it and subsequently accept the invitation for drinks. The Gin Pennant is still in regular use by Commonwealth Navies, such as the Royal Australian Navy (RAN). Within the RAN it is common practice, whilst in port, for junior officers of one ship to attempt to raise the Gin Pennant on the halyard of another ship, thereby forcing that ship to put on free drinks for the officers of the ship that managed to raise the pennant. If, however the junior officers are caught raising the pennant, then it is their ship that must put on free drinks within their Wardroom. Usually this practice is restricted to Commonwealth Navies; however, prior to increased force protection, RAN officers have successfully raised the Gin Pennant on a number of units in the USN.


« Last Edit: November 29, 2014, 10:59:23 pm by Randi »

Kookaburra

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 248
  • Not all who wander are lost.
    • View Profile
Re: Nautical terms - just for fun
« Reply #33 on: November 29, 2014, 11:26:28 pm »
Oh how fun!  And I was not far off on the design of the flag!

Dean

  • Editor
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2780
    • View Profile
Re: Nautical terms - just for fun
« Reply #34 on: November 30, 2014, 12:51:59 pm »
A couple of current 'flies' from a local retailer!! 8)

Janet Jaguar

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10205
  • Smell the sea, feel the sky, & fly into the mystic
    • View Profile
Re: Nautical terms - just for fun
« Reply #35 on: November 30, 2014, 04:45:44 pm »
 ;D

Janet Jaguar

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10205
  • Smell the sea, feel the sky, & fly into the mystic
    • View Profile
Re: Nautical terms - just for fun
« Reply #36 on: November 30, 2014, 05:23:30 pm »
Something I found while googling for something totally different.

Quote
http://www.public.navy.mil/usff/Pages/customs.aspx
Devil to Pay
Today the expression "devil to pay" is used primarily to describe having an unpleasant result from some action that has been taken, as in someone has done something they shouldn't have and, as a result, "there will be the devil to pay." Originally, this expression described one of the unpleasant tasks aboard a wooden ship.   The "devil" was the wooden ship's longest seam in the hull. Caulking was done with "pay" or pitch (a kind of tar). The task of "paying the devil" (caulking the longest seam) by squatting in the bilges was despised by every seaman.
Between the Devil and the Deep (Blue Sea)
In wooden ships, the "devil" was the longest seam of the ship. It ran from the bow to the stern. When at sea and the "devil" had to be caulked, the sailor sat in a bo'sun's chair to do so. He was suspended between the "devil" and the sea and the "deep" and a very precarious position, especially when the ship was underway.
« Last Edit: December 01, 2014, 05:28:52 pm by Janet Jaguar »

Kookaburra

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 248
  • Not all who wander are lost.
    • View Profile
Re: Nautical terms - just for fun
« Reply #37 on: November 30, 2014, 05:32:37 pm »
I had always heard it as "between the devil and the deep blue sea" and it made absolutely no sense to me.    I imagine a lot of the nautical terms made it into daily use as sailors were able to spread their lingo around much more effectively than, say, sheep herders, through their world travels and constantly changing crew-mates. 

"Devil to pay" on the other hand made sense, even if misinterpreted!  I saw it along the lines of "give the devil his due" - credit to the devil for instigating bad behavior.

Janet Jaguar

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10205
  • Smell the sea, feel the sky, & fly into the mystic
    • View Profile
Re: Nautical terms - just for fun
« Reply #38 on: November 30, 2014, 05:40:38 pm »
Me too, and nobody knew why the devil was interested in the deep blue sea.  This explains it. 

AvastMH

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7048
    • View Profile
Re: Nautical terms - just for fun
« Reply #39 on: November 30, 2014, 09:04:28 pm »
I had always heard it as "between the devil and the deep blue sea" and it made absolutely no sense to me.    I imagine a lot of the nautical terms made it into daily use as sailors were able to spread their lingo around much more effectively than, say, sheep herders, through their world travels and constantly changing crew-mates. 

"Devil to pay" on the other hand made sense, even if misinterpreted!  I saw it along the lines of "give the devil his due" - credit to the devil for instigating bad behavior.

Well now - 'sheep herders' and naval sayings reminded me that the phrase 'not spoiling the ship for a ha'p'orth of tar' does not relate to tarring ships. It is really 'not spoiling the sheep for etc'...this was a case of not scrimping on tar in the sheep wash that killed off yukky parasites.  I hasten to add that the same exchange of words does not apply to the quote 'all I want is a tall ship and a star to steer her by'. ;D

Kookaburra

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 248
  • Not all who wander are lost.
    • View Profile
Re: Nautical terms - just for fun
« Reply #40 on: November 30, 2014, 11:43:38 pm »
I hasten to add that the same exchange of words does not apply to the quote 'all I want is a tall ship and a star to steer her by'. ;D

You have a problem with tall sheep?   ;D



 ;)

Randi

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12822
    • View Profile
Re: Nautical terms - just for fun
« Reply #41 on: December 01, 2014, 07:35:57 am »
 ;D

jil

  • Editor
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2589
    • View Profile
Re: Nautical terms - just for fun
« Reply #42 on: December 01, 2014, 09:21:53 am »
 ;D  ;D  ;D

AvastMH

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7048
    • View Profile
Re: Nautical terms - just for fun
« Reply #43 on: December 01, 2014, 01:55:30 pm »
Excellent photo ;D ;D ;D

Randi

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12822
    • View Profile
Re: Nautical terms - just for fun
« Reply #44 on: December 05, 2014, 10:25:13 am »
4 December is the feast of Saint Barbara (in French: Sainte-Barbe)

She is "the patron saint of artillerymen. She is also traditionally the patron of armourers, military engineers, gunsmiths, miners and anyone else who worked with cannon and explosives. She is invoked against thunder and lightning and all accidents arising from explosions of gunpowder." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint_Barbara

On a French warship, the Sainte-Barbe can refer to the powder magazine and/or the gun-room.
On old warships the powder magazine was surrounded by the bread-room to help keep the powder dry and also to protect it from canon balls.



In Provence, on the fourth of December, you are supposed to 'plant' grains of wheat (or sometimes lentils) in a dish on a piece of wet cotton. Tradition says that if it grows well you will be prosperous the next year. Quite a lot of people still do it even though most say that it hasn't worked for them ;)