Author Topic: Condition II, Material Condition Baker  (Read 1777 times)

Randi

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Condition II, Material Condition Baker
« on: August 10, 2014, 10:10:40 am »
Hi Randi, [This refers to] the state of readiness of the ship.  The first part "Condition II" is the operational readiness (meaning how ready the ship is for offense and defense action) and the second part "Material Condition Baker" is the readiness of the ship to withstand attack (mainly the closing and opening of all of the openings in the hull and superstructure) Baker is a setting for ventilation openings. 
By the way I am continuing to translate U-boat war diaries and have completed about 250 of them.  Recently I finally figured out that many German Navy ships used the Beaufort nomenclature to describe weather.  The letters of the nomenclature caused a lot of confusion until that discovery.  I was surprised that they adopted a British system.   My notes on weather for U-boat war diaries can be seen here http://uboatarchive.net/KTBNotesWeather.htm Best regards, Jerry

Hi Randi, here are some definitions:
Condition ( ) :
    One: General Quarters (battle stations). May be modified for certain conditions, such as Condition 1-AS, in which all anti-submarine watch stations and weapons are manned, but AAW stations may not be. Modified conditions are used to minimize crew fatigue, which can be a significant factor over a prolonged period at battle stations. Other types of modified conditions include 1-SQ (battle stations for missile launch); Two: Condition of modified General Quarters, generally used on large ships; Three: Material condition of readiness commonly associated with wartime steaming where some, usually half, of the ship's weapons are kept in a manned and ready status at all times; Four: Material condition of readiness commonly associated with peacetime steaming. There are no weapons in a ready status; Five: Material condition of readiness associated with peacetime inport status. Other material conditions may be set as needed, dictated by the threat; Hairy: Alert that all units may be required to prosecute an unidentified submarine contact.
And for the material conditions:
Material Condition ( ) :
    Circle William - A material condition involving closure of ventilation fittings and machinery marked with a 'W' inside a circle. Used to control the spread of smoke in a fire belowdecks, or in preparation for an NBC attack; Xray - A material condition where fittings or closures (hatches, watertight doors, valves, flappers, etc.) marked with an 'X' ('X-ray' in the phonetic alphabet) must be closed; Generally seen only inport. Surface ships only; Yoke - Closures marked 'X' and 'Y' must be kept closed. This is the normal daylight underway material condition, and represents a minimal condition of watertight integrity; Zebra - All fittings and closures marked 'X', 'Y', and 'Z' must be closed. Maximum watertight integrity. "Set Condition Zebra" is the command to close all water-tight doors, hatches, and fittings throughout the ship.
The material conditions for ABC readiness are covered in this post http://www.worldnavalships.com/forums/archive/index.php/t-14821.html  Hope this helps.  Jerry

Thank you, Jerry!

Randi

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Re: Condition II, Material Condition Baker
« Reply #1 on: May 20, 2016, 07:57:14 am »
Here are a couple more sources:

USS Enterprise CV-6 - Operations Manual - Damage Control (Chapter 43): http://www.cv6.org/ship/logs/ops/ops_chap_43.htm


Logo by - USS Whitehurst Home Page: http://www.de634.org/facts.htm
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It is common in high threat areas to go to the highest degree of readiness a half hour before sunrise and a half hour before sunset and remain in that condition for about an hour. These are the most critical times for an attack.
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Circle D fittings are closed in the "Darken Ship" Condition, i.e. battle readiness at night.


Material Condition referred to what was happening with the physical environment of the ship. During wartimes, Baker and Affirm were the most common.

Material Condition Baker ? The ship is alert to possible problems.  Procedures are in place to make the ship as water-tight as possible but still continue with a reasonably comfortable living environment.

Material Condition Affirm -   It took about 30 minutes to move from Baker to Affirm where ?living conditions became secondary to the requirements of water-tight and air-tight integrity.?  Everything on the ship would we stowed for safety and all systems were put in a ?safety first? battle ready condition.  By the time Material Condition Affirm was instituted, fire controlmen and other battle positions were in place.


NOTE: You will find both Material Condition Affirm and Material Condition Afirm. This seems to be the same as Material Condition Able.
« Last Edit: May 20, 2016, 05:16:28 pm by Randi »