Author Topic: Crossent Saw?  (Read 2456 times)

Danny252

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Crossent Saw?
« on: January 10, 2015, 07:38:40 pm »
From a list of supplies brought aboard the Albatross:

Quote
Received on board from F Pierce:
2 Hand Hatchets, 1 Grindstone, 8 drawer Locks,
2 Hammers, 100 Spikes, 6", 25# White Lime,
2 Crossent Saws, 6 Whitewash Brushes, 25 White Lead; and
from R Rodrick + Co: 1 band of Lime and a lot of lumber. - Two cutter loads
fresh water were hauled on board.

http://oldweather.s3.amazonaws.com/ow3/final/Albatross/vol039of055/vol039of055_058_1.jpg

Any clue what the saws are? I'm also slightly doubtful of "1 band of Lime", as I'm not sure how you could make a band from lime...

Randi

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Re: Crossent Saw?
« Reply #1 on: January 10, 2015, 07:43:28 pm »

HatterJack

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Re: Crossent Saw?
« Reply #2 on: August 29, 2015, 07:42:14 am »
Probably shouldn't... but can't help myself >.>

Crossent saws are the large two-man crosscut saw used for felling trees (Oregonian here, we know our logging history).

The band of Lime (and the 25# White Lime) could have had any number of purposes aboard the Albatross, realistically. The "band" was probably a semi-formed strip of hydraulic lime, which would have more than likely been used as a sealant for seams below the waterline (hydraulic limes were great for this, as they could set nearly as hard as cement, and *required* water in order to set).

The unspecified white lime could have had any number of applications, but given the rather paltry amount, it was probably quick lime, which would have been used in the process of cleaning the funnel. If not quick lime, than it was probably a combination of calcium hydroxide and calcium carbonate, to be used as a whitewash, which would have kept the ship's white hull rather tidy, and would have had the added benefit of protecting the timber from the elements. I'm not terribly inclined to believe this to be true, except in touch-up situations, because whitewash takes a bit of time to dry properly and isn't exactly waterproof.

Depending on the year, there's also the option that it could have been an experimental silicate mineral paint, which would have been pretty great aboard a 19th century warship.

Randi

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Re: Crossent Saw?
« Reply #3 on: August 29, 2015, 07:46:36 am »
 8) 8) 8)

AvastMH

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Re: Crossent Saw?
« Reply #4 on: August 29, 2015, 12:59:57 pm »
That's fascinating. I never thought of lime as being useful at sea  :)

elizabeth

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Re: Crossent Saw?
« Reply #5 on: August 30, 2015, 12:53:52 pm »
That's fascinating. I never thought of lime as being useful at sea  :)
:o :o It is late and I might be wrong (not the first time I might add) But I though that Lime was a fruit?  Oh I also thought that the term Limey was well known in the seafaring world.  Please correct me if I am mistaken. 

Bob

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Re: Crossent Saw?
« Reply #6 on: August 30, 2015, 01:22:27 pm »

Randi

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Re: Crossent Saw?
« Reply #7 on: August 30, 2015, 01:47:24 pm »
But limes (the fruit) are useful too ;)
And, as far as I know that is where the term limey comes from.

In Two Years Before the Mast, it is raw onions (and raw potatoes) against scurvy.
« Last Edit: August 30, 2015, 01:52:39 pm by Randi »

elizabeth

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Re: Crossent Saw?
« Reply #8 on: August 31, 2015, 12:37:59 pm »
I think they mean this stuff:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lime_%28material%29

 ;)
Oh thanks for pointing that out for me makes more sense now. :)

elizabeth

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Re: Crossent Saw?
« Reply #9 on: August 31, 2015, 12:41:49 pm »
But limes (the fruit) are useful too ;)
And, as far as I know that is where the term limey comes from.

In Two Years Before the Mast, it is raw onions (and raw potatoes) against scurvy.
Yes  Yes I Knew it somewhere in the back of my mind LOL :)  But just found out that it was not was they where talking about.  ;)