Author Topic: Milo - Discussion  (Read 1163 times)

Randi

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Milo - Discussion
« on: September 25, 2015, 03:21:08 pm »
Welcome on board the Milo



Use this topic to:
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Randi

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Re: Milo - Discussion
« Reply #1 on: September 25, 2015, 03:22:49 pm »
Reserved

Randi

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Re: Milo - Discussion
« Reply #2 on: September 25, 2015, 03:22:57 pm »
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Randi

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Re: Milo - Discussion
« Reply #3 on: September 25, 2015, 03:24:18 pm »
The remainder of this topic is for you!

Ask questions.
Share interesting discoveries with us.

Make these logs live!


HatterJack

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Re: Milo - Discussion
« Reply #4 on: October 17, 2015, 02:06:34 pm »
So... this happened...

http://whaling-data.oldweather.org/subjects/logbookofmiloship00milo_0088.jpg

Last entry on the page is from when the Milo was captured by the CSS Shenandoah, more than two months after the end of the Civil War.

There was a *lot* of controversy about this particular capture (and the burning of some half dozen other whaling ships), so there *will* be another lengthy history post about this one.

Janet Jaguar

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Re: Milo - Discussion
« Reply #5 on: October 17, 2015, 04:39:01 pm »
Talk about stuff they never taught us in school.  I knew Britain sided with the Confederates because they wanted cotton, I had no idea they were outfitting and giving a home to the Confederate Navy.  Or that the destruction was continuing after the war!  Did the Milo tell you where she was when captured?  That log seems very terse and lacking in all kinds of important detail.

This is one article I'm very interested in.


Wiki: A pencil sketch of CSS Shenandoah, from the inside cover of a notebook kept by her Commanding Officer, James I. Waddell
« Last Edit: October 17, 2015, 04:41:11 pm by Janet Jaguar »

HatterJack

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Re: Milo - Discussion
« Reply #6 on: October 21, 2015, 09:20:34 am »
I did manage to find when and where, as well as the circumstances regarding the capture, and what the Confederates had Milo doing after her capture (which was very short lived). I'm going back over my notes right now, so the new article should be up sometime in the next few hours.

HatterJack

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Re: Milo - Discussion
« Reply #7 on: October 21, 2015, 02:13:38 pm »
And without further ado

Here it is.

I touched a bit on British "cooperation" with the Confederate States, and was a bit surprised to find that it was rather less than what we were taught in school.

And while I did mention in the article that Milo was captured in the Arctic, I believe I may have failed to mention that it was in the Sea of Ochotsk, rather than actually in the Arctic Sea (although it was still within the Arctic region, in general, so I don't really have plans on editing it).

I was a bit surprised at how many references I have, so once again, the main article doesn't cite anything, but if you're interested in any further reading, there's a free e-book available from Google called "Correspondence Concerning Claims Against Great Britain, Volume 7" which contains Captain Nye's testimony during the arbitration hearings against the Crown. There is also a fascinating account by one of the officers of the Shenandoah in the book "The Last Confederate Cruiser" and a short tribute to the captain and a handful of officers of the Shenandoah written by her first officer, one W.C. Whittle, which can be read here.

For more about British involvement, I highly recommend Niels Eichhorn's "The Intervention Crisis of 1862: A British Diplomatic Dilemma" and R.J.M. Blackett's "Divided Hearts: Britain and the American Civil War".

And since I referenced it, if you're interested in the Trent Affair, there's always "The Trent Affair: A Diplomatic Crisis" by Norman B. Ferris.

Outfitting the Confederates may be a bit strong a phrase for what was actually going on. The ships were being built in Liverpool because the Confederate shipyards in Pensacola and Norfolk were in no condition to build any new warships (i.e. the Union Navy would have shelled the yards if they even tried), and they had little choice but to purchase ships built by foreign shipyards. With little other option, who else to turn to but Liverpool, where some of the greatest ships in naval history were built? Additionally, the arms and munitions supplied to the Confederates was largely under the aegis of British private interests, and as such the blockade runners were operating within established international law, but as the British Parliament never actually recognized the Confederacy as a legitimate government (despite flirting with the idea in the early days of the war, when the Union Army was, let's say, less effective than in the later years) their right to supply both sides as a neutral party was never really brought into question (not that a few Union ambassadors didn't threaten the British economy in order to ensure that they remained neutral). While Southern cotton was a rather large incentive for the British to provide support to the Confederacy, by the mid-point of the war, the loss of American cotton was offset by purchasing cotton from Egypt and India, and the fallout of the Trent Affair eventually led to the Lyons-Seward Treaty of 1862, which saw the Royal and Union Navy's cooperating to put an end to the Atlantic slave trade, further compromising Britain's ability to provide any sort of military support to the Confederates, even if they had decided to acknowledge the sovereignty of the Confederate States.



Fixed links - Randi
« Last Edit: October 21, 2015, 03:23:38 pm by Randi »

Janet Jaguar

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Re: Milo - Discussion
« Reply #8 on: October 21, 2015, 03:58:01 pm »
Thanks for a more balanced view of British involvement.  Very interesting.