Author Topic: Bear (1914) -- Discussion: Questions, Comments and Coordination  (Read 4196 times)

AvastMH

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Re: Bear (1914) -- Discussion: Questions, Comments and Coordination
« Reply #120 on: June 14, 2017, 10:41:44 am »
When you're transcribing and they record coaling the ship, even if you've got some mechanical assistance, that's got to be very hard work.

mapurves

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Re: Bear (1914) -- Discussion: Questions, Comments and Coordination
« Reply #121 on: June 14, 2017, 03:30:46 pm »
And very dirty!!! Several times I have seen mention of sacks of coal.

When I was on my meteorologist's course back in 1971, I rented a suite in Bill and Albert's house. Bill was in his fifties, and Albert was his father, and close to 90. Albert used to deliver sacks of coal with a horse and wagon around Toronto in the twenties and thirties. He was very bent over from years of carrying all those sacks of coal.

AvastMH

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Re: Bear (1914) -- Discussion: Questions, Comments and Coordination
« Reply #122 on: June 14, 2017, 09:08:23 pm »
I remember my mum always handed a few bob to the coal men - they earnt very little, worked so hard, and breathed that gritty dust in all day long. As nana used to say - not many of them make old bones. So Bert did quite well to get to 90  but I bet his back was a misery to live with, bless him.

mapurves

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Re: Bear (1914) -- Discussion: Questions, Comments and Coordination
« Reply #123 on: June 15, 2017, 01:51:04 am »
I remember my mum always handed a few bob to the coal men - they earnt very little, worked so hard, and breathed that gritty dust in all day long. As nana used to say - not many of them make old bones. So Bert did quite well to get to 90  but I bet his back was a misery to live with, bless him.

He was a blessing, as was his son who had been a house painter. Bill, the son, had been disabled by a fall. When I went to look at their suite, Bill told asked me what I did. I told him that I was learning to be a weather forecaster. He told me that his contribution to Canada was to make my stay so productive that I would be the best forecaster in the country. "Right now there aren't any good ones," he said. He told me if I didn't study, or if I were rowdy in any way that Albert would toss me out on my ear.  ;D ;D ;D

Albert came out, and he was so bent over that in order to talk to me he had to fall backwards against the wall so his back would be vertical and he could look me in the eye. "Ya, I'll toss ya out!"  he said.

Naturally, with landlords like that, I just had to stay there.  ;)

Every day after my classes, Bill gave me a beer and made me recite the events of the day to him and Albert. And, every Saturday morning I had to sit with the two of them and watch the World Wrestling Federation and have two beers.

Randi

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Re: Bear (1914) -- Discussion: Questions, Comments and Coordination
« Reply #124 on: June 15, 2017, 01:57:51 am »
Good-hearted people!

AvastMH

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Re: Bear (1914) -- Discussion: Questions, Comments and Coordination
« Reply #125 on: June 15, 2017, 05:30:02 pm »
Good-hearted people!

I'll second that Randi  :D

AvastMH

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Re: Bear (1914) -- Discussion: Questions, Comments and Coordination
« Reply #126 on: August 12, 2017, 09:18:45 pm »
Bear October 3rd 1914, at Unalaska.
The ship "Tahoma" foundered on a reef in water marked as very deep. It took about 4 days to rescue the crew and passengers and so...

'following members of crew and survivors Tahoma reported on board from U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey Ship "Patterson" by direction Comd. Officer Bering Sea Fleet: - A Lipke, Electrician, 1st Cl., L. Hansen, Q. Mr., J. Krohn, coxswain, C. Stromberg, oiler, 2nd class, C. Carter, coal heaver, T. Flackety, fireman, E. Conn, fireman, E. Cann, fireman, O. Kydland, fireman, W. Pollock, seaman, J. Stokes, bugler, R. Mattson, seaman, L. Ostman, seaman, L. Johansen, seaman, C. Anderson, o.seaman, A.C. Cameron, ord.sea., H. Manguard, ord, sea., P. Cagswell, ord.sea., W. Grant, 2nd cl. buy, D. May, 1st cl. boy, F. Fukahana, cabin steward, and S. Victor, seaman, all of whom are to receive rations from general mess commencing 4th instant. Issued survivors necessary clothing and gave medical attention to those in need of same.'

And at this time they are still caring for one of the survivors of the loss of the Karluk: E. Chafe of Canadian Arctic Expedition.



Bear October 5th 1914, at Unalaska.

I'm trying to picture how the crew of the ex-Tahoma will use some of these since they no longer have things like a deck...  :-\

"Furnished crew of the "Tahoma" with 112lbs of soap, 10 galvanized iron buckets, 30 rolls of toilet paper, 5 yds #2canvas, 5 yds #5 canvas, 2 hand scrubbers, 1 deck scrubber, and 2 handles, 2 lamp burners and 3 lantern globes, 3 baking pans and two 5 gallon copper coffee pots."
« Last Edit: August 12, 2017, 10:43:45 pm by AvastMH »