Author Topic: Notes from the Field  (Read 5052 times)

AvastMH

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Re: Notes from the Field
« Reply #30 on: May 31, 2017, 08:41:31 pm »
Amazing picture - and plenty of bleak looking rock below. It's a good point that you make about the skill of the corp pilots. It looks deceptively easy in clear air with excellent visibility as we see in your picture. But I know how many days the weather in the Bear log says 'fog' to the point where they simply drop an anchor and wait the weather out.  :o

mapurves

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Re: Notes from the Field
« Reply #31 on: May 31, 2017, 10:59:12 pm »
Get those measurements while you can, Kevin! Great photo. I look forward to more when you get to a place with internet!  :)

Matt_AINA

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Re: Notes from the Field
« Reply #32 on: July 06, 2017, 06:13:51 pm »
Hello!

It has been a while, got caught up with archive visits and other work related things.

I was down in New Bedford and Mystic a few months back, imaged some British whaling logbooks that were held there and some American ones for the short lived Hudson's Bay fishery. Got to visit the Charles W Morgan which was very cool, Mystic seaport museum is my version of Disneyland!

It is not all dusty archives though and I have been getting my hands dirty this past couple of weeks. I joined the barque Picton Castle to sail from Boston to Summerside, PEI. I now have a very real appreciation of why the British Navy had to pressgang! It was no holiday. A couple of rough days in the Gulf of Maine (thankfully I don't get sea sick), but otherwise beautiful sailing. The ship is very traditional (which roughly translated into hard work) and predominately a training vessel for cadets in maritime colleges. They keep to the old ways as much as possible, all the lines are manila, all the sails are canvas and made onboard, compass has no degrees on it, there is no anemometer, with wind force being estimated from the sails and sea state. I am arranging to install an anemometer onboard to quantify the accuracy of observed wind direction/force against measured, I have no doubt it will be bang on.
They kindly allowed me to image the 2 years worth of logbooks they have onboard to test some methods on, my main focus is improving the reconstruction of daily positions.

A bonus to the voyage was Capt Sikkema, who was 1st mate on the Charles W Morgan when she completed her 38th voyage and had read a lot of her original logbooks when re-rigging her. It was great to get a sense of how the Arctic whaling ships handled...very well apparently and could sail nearly 2 points closer to the wind than Picton Castle (which is a converted 1928 North Sea trawler). Also onboard was an ex director of New Bedford and Nantucket whaling museums, so lots of whaling based conversations were had.

I wasn't too keen on going up in the rig, got to the first yard on the foremast and that was more than enough elevation. I can't imagine climbing up to the royal  :o

I have tried to attached/link photos with no success. Will keep trying!


Bob

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Re: Notes from the Field
« Reply #33 on: July 06, 2017, 06:44:10 pm »
Wow, great experience, thanks for sharing! I'm a bit jealous, though.  ;)

studentforever

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Re: Notes from the Field
« Reply #34 on: July 06, 2017, 08:15:05 pm »
Sounds a great experience. However, thank your lucky stars you weren't conscripted into the WW1 navy. One log I edited reported that 'landsmen' were sent over the masthead their first morning on board. They must have been either reluctant or unfit or both because it was a regular occurrence for ordinary seamen to start off their morniing with a run up the rigging and over the masthead. OK she was an Armed Merchant Cruiser but it probably seemed a long way off the deck. As I've got older I now feel that no-one should be up a ladder who doesn't feel happy there so even if I was accepted on an OAP cruise I don't think I'd be going up the rigging without a safety harness and landing mat!! We look forward to hearing about your next exploits.

Matt_AINA

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Re: Notes from the Field
« Reply #35 on: July 06, 2017, 08:42:17 pm »
Thanks for the PM's with assistance in uploading pics. Couldn't get Flickr to work, but imgur seems to.

Studentforever - I really am haha. Harnesses are worn onboard now, but there is nothing to clip to until you reach your destination, which is a little unnerving. Apparently accidents while climbing the rigging increased after harnesses were introduced. Thankfully there has been no accidents on Picton Castle.

Must have been rough working on a whaler, no waterproof clothing either. After 2 weeks everything I had with me was damp. One of the crew was interested in the American whaling trade and an amateur blacksmith, I have a harpoon on order for when he gets back to the shop. He had some ivory with him (sperm tooth and walrus), so got to try some scrimshaw out too.








Randi

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Re: Notes from the Field
« Reply #36 on: July 06, 2017, 08:54:42 pm »
Great trip, great pictures!

It looks like your ship's cat is well cared for ;)

studentforever

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Re: Notes from the Field
« Reply #37 on: July 06, 2017, 10:07:35 pm »
According to one day school I went on, the idea of trying to recreate old technology can be known as 'experimental archaeology'. The tutor had tried his hand at flint knapping (with a scar to prove it), different types of hand spinning and such esoteric arts as 'tablet weaving', 'hot stone broiling' etc. I've seen some museum examples of scrimshaw work and it is lovely. However I suspect that the answer given by a Chinese chef when asked how long it took to learn to produce traditional hair fine noodles of 'A lot of dough' probably represents a similarly long apprenticeship for scrimshaw work.

AvastMH

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Re: Notes from the Field
« Reply #38 on: July 06, 2017, 10:54:55 pm »
Sounds like you've been going for the total immersion way of learning Matt - and brave with it. :D Be careful of those whaling tools. I just did a whaler log which mentions that one boatsteerer 'got his hand blowed off' in the process of bringing in a whale.  There must be some nice galley-version of going over the mast?  ;) ;D

I'm duly impressed by all of you who manage to get up those masts. Well done and good luck with the data finding!  :D
« Last Edit: July 19, 2017, 08:56:43 pm by AvastMH »

mapurves

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Re: Notes from the Field
« Reply #39 on: July 07, 2017, 12:35:44 am »
Great photos!!! It sounds like it will be a wonderful memory for many years.!

jil

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Re: Notes from the Field
« Reply #40 on: July 07, 2017, 09:39:43 am »
Thanks for posting. It's great to hear about your voyage and see the photos!

Helen J

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Re: Notes from the Field
« Reply #41 on: July 07, 2017, 08:30:03 pm »
What an experience!  Great to share the experience  - from safely on land ....

Matt_AINA

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Re: Notes from the Field
« Reply #42 on: July 10, 2017, 05:53:24 pm »
Studentforever, AvastMH: You hit the nail on the head, I have been copying the archaeologists in the this practical approach. You can a good idea of things from reading the logbooks, but nothing beats first hand experience to aid understanding.

AvastMH

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Re: Notes from the Field
« Reply #43 on: July 10, 2017, 09:22:40 pm »
Studentforever, AvastMH: You hit the nail on the head, I have been copying the archaeologists in the this practical approach. You can a good idea of things from reading the logbooks, but nothing beats first hand experience to aid understanding.

 :D :D :D

Kevin

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Re: Notes from the Field
« Reply #44 on: July 18, 2017, 03:34:26 pm »
We have started putting photos on a PMEL Flickr account now. Here are two albums from our Arctic Heat experiment.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/noaa-pmel/collections/72157683914939611/

Website: https://www.pmel.noaa.gov/arctic-heat/