Author Topic: Zooniverse Beta Testing, New Projects, and Challenges  (Read 2430 times)

Randi

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Re: Zooniverse Beta Testing, New Projects, and Challenges
« Reply #120 on: December 07, 2017, 05:11:15 pm »
Weather Rescue - Update

Dear Weather Rescue citizen scientists,

3725 of you have helped successfully rescue around 1.5 million lost weather observations taken on the summit of Ben Nevis and in the town of Fort William between 1883 and 1904!

It took you less than 12 weeks. This is a wonderful demonstration of what citizen science can achieve, and it would not have been possible without you. Climate science has benefited from your dedication and this project has already inspired others to plan similar efforts in other countries.

Thank you!

But, this is not the end for Weather Rescue...

We have recently launched an ambitious project to rescue another set of lost weather observations, taken all across Europe in the early 20th century.

I know that some of you are already taking part, but if you have not heard about it, the project is discussed in this BBC article (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-42175307) which also shows some of the rescued Ben Nevis data!

If you have some spare time, please help us continue the Weather Rescue adventure: www.weatherrescue.org

Many thanks,

Ed Hawkins, project lead for Weather Rescue

Randi

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Re: Zooniverse Beta Testing, New Projects, and Challenges
« Reply #121 on: December 13, 2017, 04:32:13 pm »
Floating Forests is back!

Hi there,

We're delighted to announce the relaunch of Floating Forests!

Our science team has assembled images of Giant Kelp forests around the planet over the last thirty-five years from the Landsat series of satellites. You've helped us figure out how we can use the power of citizen science to learn about these forests.

And now it's time to turn those lessons into some exciting action.

At Floating Forests, you'll help us look at satellite images and circle where you see kelp forests. We've rebuilt the entire project in Project Builder with a brand-new image processing pipeline so that we can see kelp like we've never been able to see it before. With the new site, we're exploring parts of the world where scientists have rarely been able to look. In our first season, we want to understand how kelp forests around the Falkland Islands which hang out on the Patagonian Shelf off of South America on the edge of the subantarctic and tundra zones. These forests, a breeding ground for squid, have received little attention because they're so remote, and we're hoping to learn how thirty years of environmental change have impacted somewhere that is comparatively quite pristine.

Future seasons will include looking at kelp living on the edge of climate change zones, kelps around cities, jaunts to the subantarctic islands, and more.

You can learn more at www.floatingforests.org/about/research or visit our blog at blog.floatingforests.org.

We look forward to seeing you at www.floatingforests.org!

-The Floating Forests Science Team