Author Topic: is flect is a verb and what does it mean?  (Read 77 times)

mkbryan

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is flect is a verb and what does it mean?
« on: December 11, 2017, 10:13:08 pm »
On page 20 of Belvedere 1894 in OW Whaling, the verb flect appears in context of ice 3 times.  e.g. "had to flect in close to ground", "had to flect off again",  and "had to flect in shore".  I could not find the term in OWpedia, "terms used in US log books", or in a general forum search.  Because the ship is at anchor, I'm going to guess that flect is bending the anchor line in order to move the ship a bit so that the ice is  broken around the hull.  The bend might be done by pulling in the line and then letting it out, which will cause the ship to move because the anchor is attached to ground.  The verb flect seems nearly synonymous with the verb kedge.  Any insight, correction, and/or clarification would be appreciated.

Randi

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Re: is flect is a verb and what does it mean?
« Reply #1 on: December 11, 2017, 10:24:08 pm »
I wonder if it could possibly be fleet rather than flect :-\
FLEET [Teut. flieffen]. The old word for float: as "we fleeted down the river with our boats;" and Shakspeare makes Antony say,
"Our sever'd navy too Have knit again, and fleet, threat'ning most sea-like."

Fleet is also an old term for an arm of the sea, or running water subject to the tide. Also, a bay where vessels can remain afloat. (See Float.) A salt-water tide-creek.


On the other hand: flex & flect

AvastMH

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Re: is flect is a verb and what does it mean?
« Reply #2 on: December 12, 2017, 11:30:32 pm »
Hello mkbryan - nice to see you over here :D

Interesting handwriting because the writer sometimes makes quite a loop in the letter 'e' if it falls at the end of a word like 'Ice', but their double 'e's sometimes look almost like a 'u':

Here's Breeze and fleet and fleet from that May 16th 1894 entry:
https://www.zooniverse.org/projects/zooniverse/old-weather/talk/subjects/9634060/


I found another couple of examples a few pages later (page 26) on June 4th 1894:
https://www.zooniverse.org/projects/zooniverse/old-weather/talk/subjects/9634072/


So I agree with Randi - the word is 'fleet' which fits the context well. :D