Author Topic: HMS New Zealand  (Read 1318 times)

toucans

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HMS New Zealand
« on: November 11, 2010, 10:14:36 am »
Found this:

http://www.gunplot.net/crossingline/ctl1.html

with contemporaneous chapter and verse description of the traditional ceremony "paying homage to King Neptune" when she crossed the equator between Colombo and Australia in 1919.

In the log?  Just a note of the longitude........

« Last Edit: November 18, 2010, 11:19:57 am by toucans »

cyzaki

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Re: HMS New Zealand
« Reply #1 on: November 11, 2010, 02:48:48 pm »
I thought there were ceremonies and such when ships crossed the equator, and have been disappointed when no mention of it whatsoever has been in the logs. Not even a note to say 'Crossed equator' at the appropriate time.  :(

cyzaki

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Re: HMS New Zealand
« Reply #2 on: November 13, 2010, 06:46:37 pm »
I've joined the HMS New Zealand, another ship with lovely writing in the logs.

I've noticed the map's a bit awry though - if you type in the lat/long without the N/S or E/W you get the position the ship's shown on the map, however if you use the letters above the lat/long you get the position the ship is actually in, as verified by the names of ports given.

kin47

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Re: HMS New Zealand
« Reply #3 on: November 14, 2010, 01:15:34 am »
Hello

I think the equator ceremony was such a deep seated custom, the officers probably didn't think it rated a mention.

The custom started in the 16th Century, reportedly by French Mariners.

I've talked to many who were "baptised" in this ritual.  Good fun, at least for the men who had already experienced it.

All best

don

toucans

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Re: HMS New Zealand
« Reply #4 on: November 22, 2010, 06:58:05 pm »
On 19 October 1919 HMS New Zealand called at Christmas Island in the Pacific (now Kiritimati).

The log says they anchored off Cook Island (island in the entrance to the lagoon) at 16.33.
At 1800 the Admiral of the Fleet and staff landed.
[They never bother to say that people who have landing have later returned.]
At 1845 they 'weighed and proceeded as reqst' for Fanning Island (another atoll a bit to the north and east), where they also made a flying visit before going on Honolulu.

In the course of finding out where Christmas Island is I discovered this on wikipedia (so it must be true...)

"... Father Emmanuel Rougier, a French priest ...leased the island from 1917 to 1939 and planted some 800,000 coconut trees there. ...  Joe's Hill was named by Joe English, who served as plantation manager for Rougier from 1915-19. English was left alone on the island for a year and a half (1917?19), with two teens, when cholera broke out in Papeete and transport stopped due to the First World War. English was later rescued by Lord John Jellicoe, 1st Earl Jellicoe, Admiral of the British Fleet. English, still thinking the war was in effect and that the ship was German, pulled his revolver  on the British Admiral, causing a short standoff until some explanation defused the situation. Upon his rescue, English's adventures were later chronicled in the Boston Globe."

The things that don't get into the log...